Vin d’Orange Recipe

This lovely Vin d’Orange recipe comes from Wild Drinks & Cocktails: Handcrafted Squashes, Shrubs, Switchels, Tonics, and Infusions to Mix at Home  by Emily Han, and is best to make during winter, when citrus fruits are at their best, ready to enjoy through the next spring or summer.

Wild Drinks and Cocktails Vin dOrange crp

Read more about Wild Drinks and Cocktails in our review, and have a go at this delicious recipe.

Homemade Vin D’Orange

Here’s a vital bit of kitchen (and wildcrafting) wisdom: some recipes are meant to be enjoyed right away, while others are lovingly prepared for future pleasure. Vin d’orange falls into the latter category. Infused with winter citrus fruits, it reaches its prime in spring or summer—and that’s when you’ll thank yourself for having such foresight. (It’s also when you’ll lament that you didn’t put up more!) Served as an aperitif, vin d’orange is traditionally made from bitter oranges and dry white or French-style rosé wine. Depending on where you live, bitter oranges may be hard to locate, so this version calls for more readily available navel oranges plus grapefruit. The result is a wine that’s pleasantly bittersweet—delicious on its own over ice, or mixed with a little sparkling water.

Servings 1 quart

Ingredients

  • 2 large navel oranges (preferably Cara Cara)
  • 1 small grapefruit (preferably white)
  • 1/2 vanilla bean , split
  • 100 g sugar
  • 120 ml vodka
  • 60 ml brandy
  • 750 ml dry white or dry rosé wine

Recipe Notes

Variation: To use bitter oranges, replace the oranges and grapefruit with 3 Seville oranges.

Instructions

  • Rinse and dry the oranges and grapefruit. Trim and discard the stem ends. Cut each orange into 1/4-inch-thick (6 mm) rounds. Cut the grapefruit in half and then cut each half into 1/4-inch-thick (6 mm) half-circles.

  • Combine the oranges, grapefruit, vanilla, and sugar in a sterilized quart (1 L) jar. Pour the vodka, brandy, and wine into the jar and push the fruit down with a wooden spoon to submerge it as much as possible (it will insist on floating up). Cover the jar tightly.

  • Store the jar in a cool, dark place for 1 month, shaking it daily to moisten the floating pieces of fruit with the alcohol mixture.

  • Strain through a fine-mesh strainer. Discard the solids.

  • Bottle and store in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

  • Age for at least 1 month before drinking: the Vin d’Orange will continue to improve with age. Serve chilled.

If you decide to buy this book after reading our content, please consider clicking through our affiliate link, located within the post and in the footnote at the end.

Recipe extract from Wild Drink and Cocktails by Emily Han, published with permission from Fair Wind Press. Kavey Eats received a review copy of Wild Drinks and Cocktails. Published by Fair Winds Press, a member of the Quarto Publishing Group, this title is currently available for £14.99 (RRP).

Please leave a comment - I love hearing from you!
31 Comments to "Vin d’Orange Recipe"

  1. Urvashi

    Blimey what a fabulous sounding book. Just up my street. I love the way she’s given specific varieties of the ingredients like the navel oranges in your recipe above.
    I’m not sure I have a favourite drink made of fruits, vegetables or herbs. One that evokes many childhood memories though is the Indian Lime Soda. My mum used to make a version with oranges and just a hint of cardamom. It was soothing and refreshing at the same time.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Yes, I really like it, I’m definitely going to try several of the recipes as things come into season.
    And yes, I looove nimbu pani too!

    Reply
  2. Crystal S

    I love a good strawberry lemonade made with all natural ingredients. That book looks like it would be a lot of fun to make drinks with!

    Reply
  3. kellyjo walters

    I always make elderflower cordial and blackberry cordial all from fruit in the wild

    Reply
  4. Lucy

    The book looks great. I’ve never heard of oxymel or switchels, let alone have any idea of how to make them. It sounds great for a present for a foodie!

    Reply
  5. Shereen

    My favourite drink made from fruit is a blackberry whiskey I made to a recipe from The Cottage Smallholder website. It’s fruity, a bit spicy and had a lovely warmth. Even whiskey haters like it.

    Reply
  6. Kevin Chambers-Paston

    Oooh, this book sounds fab and right up my street! I’ve no idea what a Oxymel or Switchel is, so I guess I’ll have to buy the book to find out! I’ve experimented a fair amount with infused alcohol but there’s always more to learn. 🙂

    Reply
  7. Alida

    I love this interesting drink, I would have it for Christmas when you want something special for friends and family. Nice!

    Reply
  8. Ana

    I love the humble elderflower cordial! So fragrant and delicious. I’ve been making my own for the last couple of years, loving how the fragrance fills the house.

    Reply
  9. Emily Han

    Hi Kavey, Thank you for reviewing my book and sharing it with your readers! It’s hard to pick a favorite recipe (all the recipes are like my children!), but that Vin d’Orange is high on the list 🙂

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Hello Emily, thank you for commenting. There were so many delicious looking recipes, it was a wonderful dilemma choosing which one to share. Thank you to you and your publishers for allowing me to host this giveaway. Can’t wait to use done of my allotment harvest and foraged fruits to make some of these drinks!

    Reply
  10. Maxine G

    Sounds a lovely book – I make elderflower ‘champagne’ every year, a real taste of summer

    Reply
  11. Ray Becker

    Naughty Night large glug of Vodka, gin , white rum , white wine & a very small dash of raspberry cordial

    Reply
  12. Jane Willis

    Is it OK to say wine because it’s made from grapes? No, I thought not, so I’ll say sloe gin. This year’s is looking incredibly good, I’m itching to crack it open.

    Reply
  13. Rachel Blythe

    My absolute favourite for the morning is a sort of thin smoothie made by whizzing up half a galia melon, two pears and a generous grating of fresh ginger. Zingy and refreshing – a real pick-me-up.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to LEE HARDY Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *