Learning About Sake + My HyperJapan Sake Experience

One of my food and drink goals in recent years (and certainly for the next few too) is to learn more about sake. Not just how it’s made (which I understand pretty well now) and the different categories of sake (which I finally have downpat) but – most importantly of all – working out what I like best in the hope of reliably being able to buy sake that I love.

Here, I share what I’ve learned over the last few years plus some of my favourites at this year’s HyperJapan Sake Experience.

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Images from shutterstock.com

What is Sake?

Sake is a Japanese alcohol made from rice.

Although it is referred to in English as rice wine, it is often pointed out that the process is more akin to brewing beer, where one converts the starch to sugar and the resulting sugar to alcohol. In wine making, it is a simpler process of converting the sugars that are already present in the fruit. Of course, it’s not entirely like beer making either as the sake production process is quite distinct.

Wine is typically around 10-15% ABV. Beer is usually lower, with most beers coming in between 3-8%, though there’s been a trend towards ever stronger beers lately. Sake is brewed to around 18-20%, but often diluted to around 15% for bottling.

Until a few years ago I’d only ever encountered cheap sake served warm and was not a huge fan. However, since trying higher quality sakes served chilled, I’m an absolute convert.

In terms of typical flavours, my vocabulary is woefully lacking, but for me the core flavour is a subtly floral one – perhaps this is intrinsic to the rice and rice mould? The balance of sweetness and acidity varies though classic sake is not super sweet. Sometimes it is fruity and sometimes it has a more umami (savoury) taste. I am often able to detect clear differences on the palate but unable to define these in words – clearly I need to drink more sake!

 

How is Sake made?

Sake is made from rice, but usually from varieties with a larger, stronger grain with lower levels of protein than the rice varieties that are typically eaten.

The starch sits within the centre of the rice grain, surrounded by a layer of bran, so rice is usually polished to remove the outer layer before being made into sake. The more the rice is polished, the higher the percentage of starchy centre remains, but of course this is more expensive as it needs far more rice to produce the same volume of alcohol.

After polishing and being set aside to rest, the rice is washed, soaked and steamed. kōji rice mould (Aspergillus oryzae) is sprinkled over the rice which is left to ferment for several days. This mould helps to develop the amylase enzyme necessary to convert starch to sugar. Next, water and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are added and the mixture allowed to incubate. Water and yeast are added multiple times during the process. The resulting mash then ferments at 15-20 °C for a few weeks.

After fermentation, the mixture is filtered to extract the liquid, and the solids are often pressed to extract a fuller range of flavours.

In cheaper sakes, varying amounts of brewer’s alcohol are added to increase the volume.

Sake is usually filtered again and then pasteurised before resting and maturing, then dilution with water before being bottled.

These days you can also find unpasteurised sake and sake in which the finer lees (sediment) are left in. I’ve even had some very thick and cloudy sakes where more of the solids have been pureed and mixed in to the final drink.

 

What are the different categories of Sake?

Because the most desirable bit of the rice is the core of the grain, the amount of polishing is highly relevant. Labels must indicate the seimai-buai (remaining percentage) of the original grain.

Daiginjo means that at least 50% of the original rice grain must be polished away (so that 50% or less remains) and that the ginjo-tsukuri method – fermenting at cooler temperatures – has been used. There are additional regulations on which varieties of rice and types of yeast may be used and other production method restrictions.

Ginjo is pretty much the same but stipulates that only 40% of the original rice is removed by polishing (so that up to 60% remains).

Pure sake – that is sake made only from rice, rice mould and water – is labelled as Junmai. If it doesn’t state junmai on the label, it is likely that additional alcohol has been added.

So Junmai daiginjo is the highest grade in terms of percentage of rice polished and being pure sake with no brewer’s alcohol added.

Coming down the scale a little quality wise, Tokubetsu means that the sake is still classed as ‘special quality’. Tokebetsu junmai means it’s pure rice, rice mould and water whereas Tokebetsu honjozu means the sake has had alcohol added, but is still considered a decent quality. In both cases, up to 60% of the original rice grain may remain after milling.

Honjozo on its own means that the sake is still rated above ordinary sake – ordinary sake can be considered the equivalent of ‘table wine’ in France.

Other terms that are useful to know:

Namazake is unpasteurised sake.

Genshu is undiluted sake; I have not come across this yet.

Muroka has been pressed and separated from the lees as usual but has not been carbon filtered. It is clear in appearance.

Nigorizake is cloudy rather than clear – the sake is passed only through a loose mesh to separate the liquid from the mash and is not filtered. There is usually a lot of sediment remaining and it is normal to shake the bottle to mix it back into the liquid before serving.

Taruzake is aged in wooden barrels or casks made from sugi, sometimes called Japanese cedar. The wood imparts quite a strong flavour so premium sake is not commonly used for taruzake.

Kuroshu is made from completely unpolished brown rice grains. I’ve not tried it but apparently it’s more like Chinese rice wine than Japanese sake.

I wrote about Amazake in this post, after we enjoyed trying some in Kyoto during our first visit to Japan. Amazake can be low- or no-alcohol depending on the recipe. It is often made by adding rice mould to whole cooked rice, allowing the mould to break down the rice starch into sugars and mixing with water. Another method is to mix the sake solids left over from sake production with water – additional sugar can be added to enhance the sweetness. Amazake is served hot or cold; the hot version with a little grated ginger to mix in to taste.

 

HyperJapan’s Sake Experience

Last month I tasted a great range of sake products in the space of an hour’s focused drinking as I made my way around Sake Experience in which 11 Japanese sake breweries shared 30 classic sakes and other sake products.

Once again, this was my personal highlight of HyperJapan show.

For an extra £15 on top of the show entrance ticket, one can visit stalls of 11 Japanese sake breweries, each of whom will offer tastings of 2 or 3 of their product range. You can learn about the background of their brewery, listen to them tell you about the characteristics of their product and of course, make up your own mind about each one.

One reason I love this is because tasting a wide range of sakes side by side really helps me notice the enormous differences between them and get a better understanding of what I like best.

A large leaflet is provided as you enter, which lists every sake being offered by the breweries. A shop at the exit (also open to those not doing the Sake Experience) allows you to purchase favourites, though not every single sake in the Sake Experience is available for sale.

HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-110415

 

Kavey’s Sake Experience 2015 Picks

My Favourite Regular Sakes

Umenoyado’s Junmai Daiginjo is made using yamadanishiki rice and bottled at 16% ABV. The natural sweetness is much to my taste and the flavour is wonderfully rich with fruity overtones, and a spicy sharp piquancy that provides balance.

Ichiniokura’s Junmai Daiginjo Kuranohana is made with kuranohana rice and bottled at 15-16% ABV. This one is super fruity; the brewery team explained that they use a different yeast whch creates a different kind of flavour. There is less acidity than usual, which emphasises the sweetness.

Nihonsakari’s Junmai Ginjo Cho-Tokusen Souhana is made with yamadanishiki rice and bottled at 15-16% ABV. To me, this Junmai Ginjo represents the absolutely classic style of sake; it has a hint of dairy to the aroma and a typical sake flavour, subtly floral and very crisp.

My Favourite Barrel-Aged Sake

Sho Chiku Bai Shirakabegura’s Taruzake is barrel-aged and bottled at 15% ABV. The wood flavour comes through clearly, though it’s not overpowering – this is a clean, dry style of sake with a hint of greenery. Although it’s not hugely complex, it’s well worth a try.

My Favourite Sparkling Sakes

Ichinokura’s Premium Sparkling Sake Suzune Wabi is made with Toyonishiki and Shunyo rice varieties and bottled at 5% ABV. Unlike some sparkling sakes on the market that are carbonated artificially, the gas is 100% natural, produced during a second fermentation. This sake is sweet but not super sweet, with a fruity aroma balanced by gentle acidity. If I understood them correctly, the brewery team claimed that they were the first to develop sparkling sake, 8 years ago. Certainly, it’s a very recent development but one that’s become hugely popular, a way for breweries to reconnect with younger markets who had been turning away from sake as their drink of choice.

Shirataki Shuzo’s Jozen Mizuno Gotoshi Sparkling Sake is made with Gohyakumangoku rice and bottled at 11-12% ABV. Although most sparkling sakes are sweet, this one breaks the kōji (mould, kōji, get it?) as it’s a much dryer style, though not brut by any means. I can see this working very well with food.

For the sweeter sparkling sakes (which are usually marketed almost exclusively to women by the breweries), Sho Chiku Bai Shirakabegura’s Mio and Ozeki’s Jana Awaka are
sweet, tasty and affordable.

My Favourite Yuzu Sake

Some of the yuzu sakes I tried were perfectly tasty but very one dimensional, just a blast of yuzu and nothing else. One was a yuzu honey concoction and the honey totally overwhelmed the citrus.

Nihonsakari’s Yuzu Liqueur is bottled at 8-9%. The yuzu flavour is exceptional, yet beautifully rounded and in harmony with the sake itself. It’s not as viscous as some of the yuzu liqueurs certainly but has some creaminess to the texture. Be warned, this is one for the sweet-toothed!

My Favourite Umeshus

Learn more here about umeshu, a fruit liqueur made from Japanese stone fruits. Umeshu can be made from sake or shochu, but those at the Sake Experience were, of course, sake-based.

Urakasumi’s Umeshu is bottled at 12% ABV. Made with fruit and sake only, no added sugar, it’s a far lighter texture than many umeshu and has an absolutely beautiful flavour, well balanced between the sweetness and sharpness of the ume fruit. Because it’s so light, I think this would work well with food, whereas traditional thicker umeshu is better enjoyed on its own.

Umenoyado’s Aragoshi Umeshu is bottled at 12% ABV. A complete contrast from the previous one, this umeshu is super thick, in large part because the ume fruit, after steeping in sake and sugar, are grated and blended and mixed back in to the liqueur. The flavour is terrific and I couldn’t resist buying a bottle of this one to bring home.

My Favourite Surprise Sake

Ozeki’s Sparkling Jelly Sake Peach comes in a can and is 5% ABV. The lightly carbonated fruity liqueur has had jelly added, and the staff recommended chilling for a few hours, shaking really hard before opening and pouring the jellied drink out to serve. The flavour is lovely and I’d serve this as a grown up but fun dessert, especially as it’s not very expensive at £3 a can. I bought a few of these home with me!

 

HyperJapan in Images

HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-092153 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-105238 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-104844 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-110047 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-110115
HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-104943 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-110202 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-110246 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-111421 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-093654
HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-104853 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-093839 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-104645 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-104733 HyperJapan 2015 - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-093856
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Kavey Eats attended the event as a guest of HyperJapan.

Please leave a comment - I love hearing from you!
26 Comments to "Learning About Sake + My HyperJapan Sake Experience"

  1. Heather

    Where would you recommend for buying sake and umeshu in London? (or online?)
    I usually go to Japan Centre but wondering if there is anywhere else..

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Hi Heather, I think Japan Centre is a really good bet, I have been on a day they had some tastings on offer too and they have some great sake! I have also seen a selection at Wholefoods stores and I’ve read that Selfridges stock a good selection too.

    Reply
  2. Jacqueline Meldrum

    You know I’ve never tried it warm or cold. I tend to avoid Japanese restaurants for fear of fish sauce. Although I had some lovely dipping rolls when I was in London, that I suspect would have been good served with sake. It was nice to find out more about it. I new nothing and I mean nothing.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Glad the tutorial was useful, I wonder if there are any vegetarian Japanese restaurants around?

    Reply
  3. Katie

    Sounds like a great experience to go try out the sakes and your guide is very informative!

    Despite attending some tastings, including Bibendum’s range, I still don’t know enough to order sake with confidence anywhere…

    What would you pair the ones you’ve marked as ones to serve with food, with?

    Katie

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Katie
    I don’t have any experience of pairing sake with food. I’ve enjoyed chilled sake with Japanese food including sushi and yakitori but I couldn’t yet assert which would be better with a given dish. I would say that if you are looking to serve a sake with non-Japanese food, you might enjoy the Shirataki Shuzo’s Jozen Mizuno Gotoshi Sparkling Sake in place of a semi-dry sparkling wine.

    Reply
  4. Shezza

    The first sake I encountered was free at the end of a set meal. It warm, but tasted like so antiseptic, I wondered if it was meant as a finger bowl to clean up after the meal. G insisted it was, I drank it anyway :/

    I didn’t dabble with sake again until I spotted sparkling sake in my local Oriental supermarket, and that was only because I’d seen you mention it on Twitter. It was lovely. So thank-you for this very useful for sake beginners post.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Oh that’s nice to hear, so glad you enjoyed the sparkling sake. Hope you’ll try a few more now!

    Reply
  5. Choclette

    Goodness, I didn’t know there was so much to sake. I’ve tried it in the past and it tasted vial, but recently I had some at a Japanese friend’s house which was really ver pleasant – no idea what type it was though.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    There’s definitely some rough, cheap stuff out there! I hope you’ll give it a try again, maybe ask your friend what they served you?

    Reply
  6. Glamorous Glutton

    I love sake both warm and cold. But I’ve only had it in restaurants and wouldn’t have had a clue how to buy it. I first had cold sake in a restaurant in Hong kong and like you it was a revelation. I’m bookmarking this to help me try and buy sake. Wing Yip on the north circular has a huge range, I’ll start there. GG

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    I think one of the difficulties for me is that I need to buy from a shop that translates the label fully to provide all the relevant terms and sometimes if the main part of the name brewery name and sake name is long, they don’t bother including the other terms that would be useful. Of course, I could just learn to read Japanese but I suspect that’s very unlikely to happen!

    Reply
  7. lisa

    Eeeek This is so awesome! As you know I’m a major fan of your Japan posts Kavey! I tried a sparkling sake from Tengu sake called Yauemon Shuawa Pearl sake earlier this year and it was really good! Love the sound of the naturally carbonated sake though. Looks like a fun day!
    Love your posts! Keep them up and hope you are well xx

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    That’s very kind, I’m so glad you enjoy the posts. I hope you will seek out some of the sparkling sakes. Most are quite sweet but as I found at HyperJapan, there are some sparkling sakes that are a little dryer.

    Reply
  8. kaveyeats

    I think if you can attend a tasting event and have a few side by side, it really helps.

    Reply
  9. nazima

    Sounds like such a great event – I do enjoy reading your Japan posts and will certainly be trawling through them when I get the chance to visit there! I am not a Sake drinker but I admire your attention to detail in learning about it and really understanding it!

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Nazima, thank you so much, I love sharing my experiences not only IN Japan but about Japanese food and drink too, so it’s lovely to hear you enjoy them.

    Reply
  10. Prateek D

    Very informative guide, I love sake especially namazake and unfiltered sake. Even though traditionally Japanese food isn’t very spicy , I have found sake works well with spicier dishes a personal favorite of mine is combining kimchi and sake.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Thanks for the pairing tips, Prateek, I’ve not drunk much sake with food yet, other than sushi and yakitori, so it’s good to have some suggestions.

    Reply
  11. Snigdha (Snig of Snig's Kitchen)

    Hello Kavey

    I am beginning to try different Sakes. However, to me, all the terms and words were bewildering and confusing. I had no frame of reference for their meaning, and no idea what to look for.

    Your post is just brilliant. Informative, helpful. Like you were in the restaurant with me, helping me choose. I have learnt a lot from reading this post. And I know I am not going to be the only one.

    Brilliant work, Kavey. Thank you so much.

    with very best wishes
    Snigdha

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Thanks Snig, that’s what I found when I first started trying sake. I’m really glad you found it helpful.

    Reply

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