Three-Pea Tagine

You’ll know from guest author Jack’s review of review of Meze: Snacks, Small Plates and Street Food from the Middle East, by Sally Butcher that he was a real fan of the Three-Pea Tagine recipe. He described the spicing as beautifully layered, lifted by the bright note of mint. It works well as one dish of a larger feast, or on its own for a light lunch.

Three-Pea Tagine

For more recipes from the Meze cookbook check out Sally’s Aubergine-Wrapped Chicken and her mother-in-law Afi’s Lamb Roulade.

Three-Pea Tagine
5 from 1 vote

Three-Pea Tagine

As tagines go, this is a doddle, and it is so easy on the eye as practically all the ingredients are spherical. It is a quick dish to prepare, and so if you are lucky enough to own a tagine dish, you can either use it as a serving dish, or transfer all the ingredients into your tagine at the same time as you add the green peas: pop it in the oven at 150°C/300°F/Gas mark 2 for around 30 minutes, or until you want to serve. The addition of warm ‘dunky’ bread makes it a great informal supper dish, or you could cook less and dish it up as part of a meze spread.

Moroccan TV Supper for 4

Servings 4
Author Sally Butcher

Ingredients

  • 400 g (14oz can) chickpeas, drained or 100g /3 1⁄2 oz /1⁄2 cup dried chickpeas, soaked overnight)
  • 200 g (7oz /1 cup) chana dal (split yellow peas)
  • 75 g (2 3⁄4 oz /1⁄2 cup) raisins
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • olive oil for frying
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 level tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 level tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1⁄2 tsp chilli (red pepper) flakes (optional)
  • 550 ml (18 fl oz/ scant 2 1⁄2 cups) vegetable stock, or water
  • 350 g (12oz /3 cups) frozen peas, or fresh if it is that time of year
  • around 12 cherry tomatoes
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1⁄2 bunch fresh coriander (cilantro), chopped
  • 1⁄2 bunch fresh mint, shredded

Instructions

  • If you are using dried chickpeas, rinse them and cook in fresh water for about 11⁄2 hours, or until they are soft without falling apart: the addition of a pinch of bicarbonate of soda will accelerate the cooking process.
  • Soak the chana dal for around 45 minutes. Likewise, the raisins, although they only need 20 minutes’ soaking time.
  • Fry the onion in a little oil, then once it has softened and become translucent, add the garlic and spices and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add the stock or water and bring to the boil before lowering in the drained chana dal, turning the heat down and leaving to simmer (you may need to top up the cooking liquid during this time).
  • After about 45 minutes, drain the raisins and add them to the tagine together with the cooked chickpeas, frozen peas, cherry tomatoes and a little salt and pepper. Bubble away for a further 10 minutes, or until the peas and tomatoes are cooked. Take the pan/tagine pot off the heat or out of the oven, check and adjust the seasoning, and finally sprinkle the contents liberally with the chopped herbs.
  • Enjoy hot or just warm. Perfect for a Sunday evening in front of the TV, watching Casablanca of course.

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Recipe extracted from Meze: Snacks, Small Plates and Street Food from the Middle East, by Sally Butcher with permission from publisher Pavilion Books. Image credit to Yuki Sugiura. Currently available from Amazon UK (at time of publishing) for £9.56 (RRP £12.99). 

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2 Comments to "Three-Pea Tagine"

  1. Jackie Gately

    This dish sounds like a fantastic comfort food! It sounds so hearty with the chickpeas, lentils, and peas flavored with onion and garlic as it’s base. The raisins add an unexpected ingredient, but I like it! I think the cilantro and mint are a decidedly “bright” addition, as Jack said of the mint. What a delicious combination of flavors in this Three-Pea Tagine—this one is a keeper. I can see this as a Sunday munch, but also as an excellent dish to bring to a potluck! I’m bookmarking this recipe for just that occasion.

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