Golden Kiwifruit, Pineapple & Turmeric Smoothie Recipe

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I love kiwifruit!

Although native to China, the kiwifruit is most strongly associated with New Zealand. New Zealanders were the first to grow the fruit commercially, after its cultivation was brought across from China a little over a century ago. Indeed, the name most of us know the fruit by today comes from the nickname given to it in the 1960s by New Zealand farmers when they started to export overseas – before that it was known as Chinese Gooseberry and Melonette!

Today, China and Italy are the first and second largest producers, respectively, with New Zealand in third place, though it’s fair to say that the popularity of the fruit is thanks to the New Zealanders. China and Italy didn’t grow the crop commercially until long after New Zealanders had brought it to the attention of Europeans and Americans.

The kiwifruit I know best is about the size of a hen egg and has furry brown skin and distinctive green flesh with a pale core surrounded by a ring of tiny black seeds. The flavour is not like any other fruit I know, though in my mind it has flavour characteristics a little similar to pineapple, and that same propensity to be a little sharp when not quite ripe! High in Vitamin C, easy to peel and particularly pretty when sliced into discs, I’ve enjoyed kiwifruits for breakfast, snacks throughout the day and in desserts – they look gorgeous on top of a fruit tart or pavlova.

I first came across golden kiwifruit last year, courtesy of producer Zespri who have developed a gorgeous yellow-fleshed cultivar called SunGold. SunGolds have thin, smooth yellow-brown skins (which means they’re suitable to eat unpeeled if you like), and they are also much sweeter than their green cousins.

I’ve been enjoying these gorgeous golden kiwifruits the classic way – by cutting in half and scooping the sweet flesh out with a teaspoon. But they’re also delicious in smoothies. Indeed, if you have a power blender (like my Froothie Optimum, below), you can simply cut off the pedicel – the hard bit where the fruit was attached to the stalk – and throw the kiwifruit in whole, the thin skin will add nutritious fibre and a subtle bitterness to your smoothie. Alternatively, cut off the pedical, peel, and just use the flesh.

Here, I’ve combined Zespri SunGold Kiwifruits with pineapple and a little fresh turmeric for a three-ingredient golden smoothie.

Kiwifruits also work well combined with apple and mint, with bananas and berries or even with coconut milk for a non-dairy shake.

Zespri Sungold Kiwi Fruit Pineapple Turmeric Smoothie on Kavey Eats 2

Golden Kiwifruit, Pineapple & Turmeric Smoothie Recipe
5 from 12 votes

Golden Kiwifruit, Pineapple & Turmeric Smoothie

The amounts below create one small smoothie but can easily be scaled up for a larger portion or to serve more people. 

Course Drinks
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 1

Ingredients

  • 3 kiwifruit peeled (about 250 grams)
  • 100 grams fresh pineapple peeled and cored
  • 1-2 cm piece of fresh turmeric root
  • Optional: water

Recipe Notes

If you can't get fresh turmeric root, you can substitute ⅓ teaspoon ground turmeric (powder).

Instructions

  • Add ingredients to blender and blend until smooth.
  • If the smoothie texture is thicker than you like, add a couple of tablespoons of water and blend again. Repeat, as needed to reach your preferred consistency.
  • Best enjoyed freshly made.

Zespri Sungold Kiwi Fruit Pineapple Turmeric Smoothie on Kavey Eats 3
Click to see more Froothie Optimum blender recipes from Kavey Eats

Zespri Sungold Kiwi Fruit Pineapple Turmeric Smoothie on Kavey Eats 1

Kavey Eats was commissioned to develop and publish this recipe for Zespri International Limited. Copyright remains with Kavey Eats.

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43 Comments to "Golden Kiwifruit, Pineapple & Turmeric Smoothie Recipe"

  1. kaveyeats

    Yeah I did too, love learning more about the origin of favourite foods! Hope you can find some to try.

    Reply
  2. Lisa | Garlic & Zest

    I don’t see a lot of turmeric root in the store, but I can sometimes get it at the Farmer’s market… but I always have some powdered turmeric. Now I need to find those kiwis.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    I don’t see it too often but I most commonly come across it in an oriental supermarket or grocer’s. When I see it, I buy a bag and shove it in the freezer as it is. When I need it, like for this recipe, I take out a piece the size I need, and peel it with a teaspoon, and then use. As the pieces are small they defrost pretty quick but my power blender can blend frozen fruit and veg anyway.

    Reply
  3. Dahn

    I don’t usually see as much golden kiwi in the stores but lately I have been noticing it much more frequently. This looks like a delicious smoothie

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    Yes, I think the exporters are making efforts to let consumers know about it, hence getting in touch with bloggers like me!

    Reply
  4. kaveyeats

    Yeah, I took some into work yesterday and one of my colleagues commented on the thin unfurry peel and then just ate them with the peel on. I looked it up and apparently the peel is edible for the regular ones too but the furry texture and the fact they’re thicker means few people want to eat it!

    Reply
  5. kaveyeats

    Thanks, I wanted to add a smaller amount of a second fruit just to give a little more complexity of flavour. The turmeric is for colour, flavour and for the health properties it’s said to have — I can’t comment on how true those claims are but my Indian family consider it a traditional medicinal herb.

    Reply
  6. Gingey Bites

    Well, I never knew Kiwis originated from China! Love the name ‘melonette’ too! This looks great, very healthy and I’d love to try the flavours together.

    Reply
  7. Choclette

    Oh yes, I remember calling them Chinese gooseberries now. It’s such a long time ago since I’ve heard it, I’d forgotten. We spent a week pruning kiwis in NZ, so that name has stuck. Love the sound of this golden version.

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    I don’t remember them as Chinese gooseberries, but I can see why they were known as such!

    Reply
  8. Jagruti

    HI,Golden kiwi are quite rare in my part of the world, if I can get hold of it I’d sure like to try this smoothie for myself, thanks for sharing

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    You can use green ones, you may want to add a touch of honey or sugar if they are a bit tart, and of course the colour won’t be quite the same, but taste should be.

    Reply
  9. Heidi Roberts

    I never knew kiwi fruit comes from China originally! I keep looking for the yellow ones but haven’t seen them yet,

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    I didn’t either, but a lot of fruit we cultivate globally originated in China or South America it seems!

    Reply
  10. Fiona Maclean

    Oh gosh! can you freeze tumeric root? I guess that means you can freeze ginger too? I love that flamingo glass. And, golden kiwis sound delish

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    I’ve been freezing it and using it and not died so I’m going to say yes, though I confess it never occurred to me not to! 😂 Thanks for your flamingo glass love

    Reply
  11. kaveyeats

    Yes, it did make for a pretty colour! If you can’t find it, by all means use green ones plus a touch of honey or sugar if needed.

    Reply
  12. Claire

    Love this. Am a bit allergic to green kiwi, wonder if these would be ok? Am making turmeric smoothie myself at the mo- love the earthy taste it gives!

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    It’s pretty much the same fruit so sadly I suspect you may still be allergic. It’s like two different varieties of apples… I guess you could try a tiny bite to see, depending how severe your reaction is.

    Reply
  13. Corina Blum

    It sounds delicious and so healthy too, especially as it has turmeric in as well. I’ll have to try it in a smoothie soon, although I’m not sure if my old blender would cope with root turmeric!

    Reply
    kaveyeats

    It’s pretty soft, so if it can handle fruit, it should be fine, but if not you could grate the turmeric first, or use a food processor instead?

    Reply

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