If you don’t know Kingly Court in Soho, you’d be forgiven for not realising it’s there. An open space between buildings fronting onto Ganton Street to the North, Carnaby Street to the East, Beak Street to the South and Kingly Street to the West, this tiny enclave has become a bustling food hub with over twenty restaurants, bars and cafes crammed into its small area.

On the second floor, looking out over the open court space, is Señor Ceviche. This funky and colourful restaurant and cocktail bar is modelled on the vibe of Barranco, an increasingly bohemian district of Lima that is home to artists, musicians and designers and full of charming boutiques and lively restaurants and bars.

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At the back of the room is the open kitchen and to one side the bar. Decor is eclectic, with pattern-painted wooden floors, wooden panels on some of the walls and colourful posters on the others. The industrial-style ceiling has been left uncovered, as is increasingly common these days. Some beautiful traditional tiling finishes the charmingly mish-mash look.

The food is fun too, with colourful dishes based on Peruvian streetfood. As is only fitting, a few of the dishes showcase Japanese flavours too; Peruvian cuisine has been much influenced by Nikkei immigration in the last century and this fusion of traditions is prevalent in Peru.

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Of course, there’s a great cocktail list with several Pisco-based options. Pete has a straight Pisco Sour (£8.50), also available in passion fruit, lemongrass, spiced pineapple and strawberry flavours. I enjoy my tall Ayahuasca (£9) – a blend of rum, peach liqueur, spiced pineapple syrup and ginger beer.

The vibe is relaxed, with upbeat music playing, but not so loud that you can’t chat to your friends as you eat.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8440

The menu is split into several sections and staff advise ordering around 3 dishes per person from across the menu.

From Para Picar we choose Aubergine picarones (£6), sweet potato and aubergine doughnuts with aioli and roasted peanuts. I love the sweet potato batter but the aubergine inside is bland and the aioli lacks punch too. The sweet potato is definitely the saving grace of the dish though, and makes it a thumbs up rather than a so so.

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The Sanguchitos (sandwiches) section is short and sweet but we’re keen to try one so we choose Atun (£5.50). The small brioche bun is filled with seared tuna in a miso and honey glaze, with spring onion, cucumber and tarragon mayo and it’s gorgeous! Definitely order one per person as the juiciness of the filling means it disintegrates fast and isn’t easy to hand over; not that you’ll want to share anyway!

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8443

Part of me feels that we ought to choose Senor Ceviche (£9) from the Ceviche & Tiradito section, named as it is for the restaurant itself. But Pete’s not a fan of octopus or squid so we order Mr Miyagi (£7) instead – salmon with tiger’s milk (the colloquial name given to the dressing of fish juices and citrus), pomegranate, purple shiso and salmon scratchings and we’re not sorry. Soft, slippery salmon pairs perfectly with its dressing, and the pomegranate, shisho and crispy salmon skin add sweetness, herb and crunch.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8448

It’s the Peruvian Barbecue section of the menu I find hardest to resist.

First we have the Anticucho de res (£7), two skewers of thinly cut and folded beef heart grilled and served with a crunchy red salad, a vivid sweet potato mayonnaise and a little tapenade-like pile of olives, aji panca (chilli pepper) and mint. I love these skewers; not too chewy and with a mere hint of offal flavour, the beef heart is smoky from the grill and nicely balanced by the garnishes. Pete agrees it’s not too awful for offal but leaves the majority of it to me.

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I do like the flavour of the crusted marinade on the Pachamanca pork ribs (£9) but they’ve been cooked too long, resulting in a thicker blackened crust and more lingering burnt flavour than is ideal; a little char is wonderful but too much just tastes of soot! Under the very thick crust, the meat is nicely cooked and the herbs, spring onions and coriander scattered over the top bring a little freshness back. Grilled a few minutes less I think this dish would be a winner.

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As it’s name implies, Super pollo (£8) is super, one of my favourite dishes of the meal. The marinated and grilled chicken is superbly moist, and here the charring is just right to add flavour without overwhelming the dish. The red pepper sauce and piquillo pepper salsa are spot on. The only thing I would change about this dish is to suggest better filleting of the meat – too many lumps of cartilage to spit out for my liking.

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From Sides & Salads we choose the Frijoles negros (£4), black beans cooked with smoked bacon, burnt aubergine, aji panca, pineapple and sour cream. I can’t really detect the pineapple but the overall flavour is lovely, though in retrospect I think one of the salads may have been a better match for the other dishes we chose.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8462

We’re a little full really to have anything from the Postre (dessert) section but agree to share a portion of Tres Leches (£5). I’m glad we do as this modern take on the traditional cake features a delightfully light and moist chocolate sponge, pisco syrup, white chocolate and saffron cream and dulce de leche ice cream. A lovely dish to finish a vibrant and enjoyable lunch.

The bill, with a coffee added, is £61.50 before service, so about £30 a head and we’ve certainly been a little greedy – we would have been perfectly full and contented with one or two fewer dishes!

The food and atmosphere here is lovely, and the place is busy during our weekday lunchtime visit. I’d recommend planning in advance and booking a table, especially if you’re coming in a group for an evening meal. During the weekday, you may be able to wing it, especially if you avoid the weekday lunch rush and pop in for an early or late lunch.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Señor Ceviche.

Señor Ceviche Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Square Meal

 

You might be wondering why I’m sharing chocolate eggs with you now, on Good Friday, when it’s a little late to get your hands on them in time? But the good news is that Brownie Heaven sell their amazing eggs all year round, so if you didn’t get the egg of your dreams this Easter, why not make up for it by ordering one of these beauties for yourself?!

I’ve been seeing a few of these brownie-coated egg creations recently but Brownie Heaven have been making them since 2010 and believe they are the original brownie egg baker! Their Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs are made by wrapping a Cadbury’s Creme Egg, Cadbury’s Caramel Egg or Ferrero Rocher in a thick layer of chocolate brownie mixture and baking it in an egg shape. The Creme egg ones are dusted in biscuit crumbs, the Caramel egg version are coated in salty pretzels and the Ferrero Rocher eggs are coated in crushed Ferrero Rocher chocolates.

Brownie Heaven’s range also includes regular brownies, not just plain chocolate ones but a riot of flavours including Chocolate Chilli, Cognac Truffle, Dr Pepper flavour, Irish Whiskey, Milk Chocolate Chip, Rocky Road, Salted Caramel, Sticky Peanut Butter and more. Brownie Heaven have been making and selling their brownies since 2007, starting in their coffee shop and catering business in East Yorkshire, before expanding to food festivals and markets, before finally setting up their website for online mail order.

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They usually sell their Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs in boxes of four of one type, but recently sent me a mixed box for review with two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente. A box of four Cadbury’s Creme Egg Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs or Ferrero Rocher Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs retails for £22.95, a box of Salted Pretzel Caramel Scotch Eggs is £23.95 and both prices include courier delivery in the UK.

I thought these were great fun, and a really unusual idea too, even if they’ve been much copied since. The brownie is dense and rich, so a quarter or half egg at a time is plenty, which means you can share these with a friend or just eke them out for a week! We shared ours with some friends who also really enjoyed them.

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GIVEAWAY

Brownie Heaven are offering one mixed box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs to a reader of Kavey Eats. The box will contain two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente and includes delivery to a UK address.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
If you were designing a new brownie for Brownie Heaven, what would you put in the centre of a Chocolate Brownie Scotch Egg?

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow both @Kavey and @brownieheaven on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win a box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs by @BrownieHeaven from Kavey Eats! http://bit.ly/KaveyEatsBH #KaveyEatsBrownieHeaven
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle to the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

RULES, TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 6th May 2016.
  • The two winners will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • The prize is a Brownie Heaven box containing two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente. Delivery to a UK address is included.
  • The prize is offered by Brownie Heaven and cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, entrants must be following @Kavey and @brownieheaven at the time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check relevant accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Kavey Eats received a review box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs from Brownie Heaven.

The winner of the giveaway was Lindsey Stuart.

 

Pete and I have been waffling-mad the last few weeks! We’ve made regular waffles, Belgian waffles, mashed potato waffles and more, and the list of ideas still to try is at least ten times that long.

It’s all down to our new waffle maker, Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle. We’ve already test driven the Smart Scoop ice cream machine, the Quick Touch microwave and the Tea Maker kettle, all part of the same range, and all with similarly clever ideas that make using each one a pleasure.

The Smart Waffle has a number of clever features that set it above other waffle makers on the market. There’s a wide wraparound moat to catch and cook overflow batter, so you can safely add enough batter to properly fill the space without worrying that the excess will surge out and make a mess on your worktop. The waffle plates are made of cast aluminium which ensures that heat is distributed evenly, and they are also are good and deep, creating lovely thick, square waffles. The housing is stainless steel and easy to keep clean.

There are different settings for different types of waffles – Belgian, Classic, Chocolate or Buttermilk – and you can also adjust colour from Light to Dark with 12 levels to choose from. These combine to set temperature and cooking time automatically. Like the microwave, there’s the A Bit More button to give a short burst of extra cooking time if you open the machine when it beeps that it’s done but feel it needs a little longer after all.

So far, we’ve found it a pleasure to use, and all our different waffle recipes have all come out very well.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats-8237 The Smart Waffle

Next on the list was a decadent chocolate waffle that would be perfect for breakfast or dessert. There are hundreds of recipes all around the web to choose from but the one that stood out was this brownie belgium waffle by American blogger Sommer. This produces a super rich chocolate waffle that’s not as sweet as you’d assume given the 100 grams of sugar. The ‘double chocolate’ comes from cocoa powder and chocolate chips and the soft interior and crisp exterior are exactly what’s promised by ‘brownie-style’. I’ve rewritten the recipe in metric measurements and provided new instructions to suit our waffle maker, though of course you can adjust to use whatever waffle maker you have.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats (2)

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Belgian Waffles

Makes 4 waffles in the Smart Waffle maker

Ingredients
Waffle batter

200 g granulated sugar
80 g plain flour
80 g (unsweetened) cocoa powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
60 ml water
90 g unsalted butter, melted
120 g mini dark chocolate chips*
vegetable oil, to spray
Topping
100 ml double cream
1 tablespoon icing sugar
1-2 bananas
1 small pack blueberries

Note: If you cannot find mini dark chocolate chips, finely chop a bar of dark chocolate instead. The small size allows little bits of chocolate to distribute evenly within the batter.

Method

  • Preheat your waffle maker. Ours has a Belgian waffle setting, which we selected for this recipe, with the darkness level set to 2 up from Lightest.
  • In a large bowl mix sugar, flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt.
  • In a small bowl beat the eggs, vanilla extract and water, before adding to the dry ingredients and mixing together.
  • Add in the melted butter and beat vigorously to mix well and create a thick, gloopy batter.
  • Stir in the chocolate chips.
  • Oil the waffle maker with vegetable oil using a spray or wipe on with kitchen towel.
  • Spoon a quarter of the batter into each half of the waffle machine, close and cook until the machine beeps (about 3 minutes), or until fully shaped but soft to the touch.
  • Open the machine and leave to cool for 30 seconds. As these waffles are super soft and very fragile when hot, we found it easiest to place a small baking tray over the cooked waffles and flip the entire machine upside down; this is a two person job but the easiest way to get them out without breaking. After a few seconds of cooling outside the waffle machine, the surfaces start to crisp up beautifully. The inside stays soft, like a brownie or chocolate cake.
    If flipping the waffle machine over is not a good option for you, cook the waffles on the Lightest setting, open the waffle maker when it beeps done and leave in the machine to cool down for at least 5 minutes before carefully removing the waffles with a pair flexible spatulas.
  • Repeat cooking steps for second half of the mixture.
  • We served with lightly-sweetened whipped double cream, sliced bananas and blueberries.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats (1)

You may also enjoy these sweet waffle recipes from fellow food bloggers:

 

 

Kavey Eats received a Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle for review. As always, I was not expected to write a positive review; all opinions are my own and I recommend only products I truly believe in. This post contains affiliate links; please see my sidebar for further information.

 

I’ve been enthusing for over a year about my friend Dom Ramsey’s bean-to-bar chocolate business, Damson, established in February 2015 and now based in dedicated premises in Chapel Market, Angel Islington. Dom makes superb chocolate which won awards from the get go and you can buy it in the shop or online. If you’ve not tried it yet, his Buffalo Milk chocolate (of which there have been several batches made with different cocoa beans) is amazing, and the Madagascar 70% is also a winner. The Liquorice & Sea Salt is not one I’m ever going to try but I know liquorice fans adore it. And if you can get your hands on the Whisky Cream – milk chocolate aged alongside wooden chips from a barrel in which Glen Garioch whisky was once aged, until the chocolate takes on flavours that soaked into the wood – you won’t be sorry!

DamsonWhiskyCream

Until recently, I thought Dom was the only bean-to-bar chocolate producer in London – the majority of specialist chocolate shops in London are chocolatiers and most chocolatiers don’t make bean-to-bar chocolate, they buy chocolate in from producers and either use it as is in their chocolate products, or blend different batches to create just what they need. Some work with the producers to have chocolate made to their personal specifications, giving them great control over quality and flavour without taking on the production directly.

But Dom tells me that the bean-to-bar category is expanding fast and that there are now many more people producing their own chocolate across the UK. Some of those are making chocolate at home, for their own pleasure and enjoyment, and others are creating businesses to sell their chocolate commercially.

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A few weeks ago I heard from Tad Osborne, founder of Tadzio Chocolate, another London-based bean-to-bar producer making chocolate from single source beans and unrefined cane sugar. He roasts, hand winnows (peels), grinds and conches by hand and then sets some of the chocolate into solid bars, using the rest to make chocolate truffles.

Tad has always enjoyed good chocolate and making chocolate brownies and truffles for friends but, like Dom, his background is not a culinary one; indeed he is currently still working as a contractor in financial services.

A few months ago he travelled to Vietnam and while there he visited MAROU’s factory in Ho Chi Minh City. MAROU, founded by Samuel Maruta and Vincent Morou, is one of my favourite chocolate brands (one I first tried through Dom, I think), so I can completely understand how Tad was so inspired. As he says, ‘their chocolate is incredible and uses nothing but sugar and cocoa solids. When I got home I bought a grinder and some cocoa beans and got to work. That was about 4 months ago.

Like Marou, Tadzio Chocolate uses nothing but minimum 70% cocoa solids and unrefined cane sugar; Tad is keen ‘to let people taste and enjoy the vast difference in cocoa varieties and regions without disguising their flavours.

I am enormously taken with the Japanese-design packaging – a small circular red seal that turns out to be Tad’s name (‘Tado’) in the phonetic hiragana script – and beautiful artistic stickers used to seal wrappers and bags. I ask Tad to tell me more about it and he explains that he spent some time living in Japan, has a Japanese girlfriend and is also appreciative of ‘the meticulous attention to detail the Japanese have in all of their activities’, something he tries to adopt himself. It’s a way to express something about himself as a person in the way he presents his products.

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As for the chocolate, Tad first sent me a bar of 71% Venezuelan Puerto Cabello and a bag of truffles made from the same chocolate plus cream, vanilla essence and salt. Both are delicious. The chocolate is well made, with a pleasing aroma, nice snap and really rich and intense flavours, mostly in the fruity spectrum – both fresh berries and dried fruit – but with quite low acidity, just enough to give balance. I would recommend that Tad tap the moulds more robustly after pouring in the chocolate as there were a few bubbles in the bar, but this is a minor issue and doesn’t affect taste or texture of the chocolate itself.

The truffles are similarly rich and intense. I can’t detect the vanilla but I’m glad of that – I’m not sure this chocolate needs it. I particularly like the smooth texture and same excellent flavour as in the bar.

It’s great to see more high quality bean-to-bar chocolate in London, and from what I’ve tried so far, Tadzio Chocolate will be a welcome addition to the category once he starts trading fully. I certainly look forward to trying more of his chocolate soon.

Thus far, Tad has set up a limited company and is licensed to sell his products, but hasn’t yet established a website or online store but you can get in touch with him via his Facebook page, or email him directly at tad.osborne@gmail.com if you’d like to place an order. His 50 gram bars are currently £3 each and a bag of 7 truffles is £6. As he makes small batches, you will need to ask him what variety he has available at the time.

Kavey Eats received review samples from Tadzio Chocolate.

 

Having spent most of the last year working down in New Malden (and living as I do at towards the north end of North London) I’ve really not eaten out in central London very much lately. So in the week following the end of my contract, I’ve really made up for lost time, eating out almost every day of my first week off.

The Cornwall Project Dining Room in the Newman Arms pub, a short walk from Tottenham Court Road station, has made a big impression on many food lovers I know in the 6 months since it opened late last summer. This new restaurant resides in one of London’s oldest pubs, the charming and tiny Newman Arms having been established back in 1730. Downstairs remains a small traditional boozer; upstairs is an equally cosy dining room – booking a table in advance is strongly recommended.

Behind the project are Matt Chatfield of the Cornwall Project and chef Eryk Bautista, a name I’d never heard before but will absolutely remember now I’ve tasted his cooking. Matt set up the Cornwall Project a few years ago, keen to find new markets for fresh Cornish fish, meat and vegetables after a slump in orders from Spain, previously a big consumer of the region’s high quality produce. In the last few years, he has successfully established long term relationships to supply some of London’s top restaurants including The Ledbury, Lyle’s and Pitt Cue. More recently, he has teamed up with chefs to establish residencies in pubs, the Newman Arms being the latest of these partnerships.

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Given the shockingly low price at lunch, two courses for £15 and three for £19, it was a pleasant surprise to be served a plate of very fresh, very tasty bread and good quality butter.

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My friend Katy was more than happy with her heritage carrots, smoked ricotta, blood orange & hazelnuts – she’d really enjoyed a similar dish featuring beetroot and ricotta on a previous visit and this version lived up to her memory. It was also utterly beautiful on the plate.

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I was far too busy eating my Cotswold egg, smoked mash, wild garlic and toasted buckwheat to get the money shot of oozing egg yolk so you’ll have to take my word for it that it was absolutely perfect; cooked sous vide I think. I loved the combination of flavours and ingredients, especially that lightly smoked mash with the wild garlic sauce, the softness of egg, mash and sauces relieved by that scattering of super crunchy toasted buckwheat.

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Katy’s main of hake, cauliflower, cider and Coolea featured one of my all-time favourite cheeses. She confirmed that the fish was perfectly cooked, fresh and full of flavour and perfect with the cauliflower, cider and cheese.

For sides, we shared the crispy pink fir with herb mayonnaise, lovely fried delights that reminded me a lot of the beef-dripping potatoes Pete and I had enjoyed at the Bukowski Grill two days earlier. More mayonnaise would have been welcome, but a minor niggle.

White sprouting broccoli with almonds & cardamon yoghurt was another super side dish; I’d never have thought to combine these ingredients but they were wonderfully well balanced and very light too.

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The star of the show for me was my pork belly, chicory, miso, peanuts & coriander. Not only was the pork belly cooked as well as I’ve ever had it – soft meat, unctuous melty fat and a super crisp crackling with just the right amount of chew – that charred chicory with peanuts, miso and coriander puree was utterly heavenly. One of the best vegetable sides I’ve ever had.

I still cannot get over the bargain of this level of cooking, of this quality of ingredients, for just £15 for two courses, with sides just £3 extra each.

Too full for dessert, we resisted the cheese board and the cake, but next time I’m coming as hungry as I can!

Definitely one to visit again and again!

 

This month sees the launch of new restaurant Dalloway Terrace, part of The Bloomsbury Hotel and making clever use of the terraced patio garden to one side of the building. A retractable roof and heavy duty clear plastic ‘walls’ have been built to keep diners warm and dry during cold or wet weather; easy to open up when it’s warm and dry.

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I visited at the beginning of the month and loved the contradiction of sitting outdoors on a cold but crisp day with paving underfoot, greenery climbing up outer brick walls and everything lit by lanterns and generously-strung fairy lights. I was certainly not cold – overhead heaters pour out lots of warmth and every guest is given a thick and soft woolly blanket to drape over their lap or around their shoulders if they prefer. I know it will be a glorious space during the summer but oh, on the cusp of spring giving way to winter, it was magical and romantic and rather enchanting.

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Cocktails are at the higher end of the London pricing scale, quite a contrast to my recent favourite at Bukowski Grill, though of course I appreciate that the styles of these two venues are completely different. The Mrs Dalloway champagne cocktail (£12) I’m recommended as an aperitif is lovely – champagne, Courvoisier VSOP, sugar and Angostura bitters; I ask them to go light on the latter and they do.

Wines are reasonably priced; a bottle of house red or white will set you back £21.50 and there are (a handful of) other bottles below £30.

Bread is not complimentary, as I’d expect it to be at this kind of restaurant (hell, if the Newman Arms, which I visited the day before, can afford it on their stunningly bargainous £19 lunch menu, surely the Dalloway can too?) Our basketed bread selection (£2.50) contains Guinness brown bread, soda bread, sourdough and oh, that Guinness brown bread has a fantastic flavour.

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There are many appealing dishes on the menu, so it’s hard to narrow down our choices.

Helen orders the crispy pig cheeks, mustard crème fraîche, apple & raisin chutney (£8), and these are superb. The meat inside each parcel is beautifully cooked, meltingly soft, full of flavour and the breading and deep-frying gives much-needed contrasting crispness. The chutney with it is also very good indeed, and balances the beefy pork cheeks beautifully. A winner of a dish.

My Balmoral Estate venison carpaccio, creamed horseradish, pickled walnuts (£11) is also enjoyable, though I am surprised to be served dried rather than fresh venison; my understanding of ‘carpaccio’ is that it’s fresh raw meat, not cured.

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No complaints on the number of fat and juicy scallops in my main of hand-dived seared scallops spinach, chanterelles & teriyaki dressing but the price tag of £25 still feels too steep, especially as the dish is not very filling without the addition of sides, at additional cost. The presentation could also do with some work, the scallops hidden in a mess of spinach leaves, drenched in far too much teriyaki dressing which makes everything soggy and forms a huge pool at the bottom of the bowl. That said, flavours are excellent and the scallops are beautiful and nicely cooked.

Shoe-string chips (£4.50, not shown) are decent, though could do with half a minute longer in the fryer. The rocket & parmesan salad (£4.5) is shockingly small, the smallest side salad I think I’ve ever been served anywhere. Stinginess like this makes a poor impression, a shame when the rest of food is making a good one.

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Helen’s seared tuna, soy & ginger dressing, pickled radish (£18) is gorgeous, a good portion, beautifully plated and cooked very well. Flavours are again very good. But it’s odd not to include any vegetables on the plate, one is absolutely reliant on ordering side dishes, and if the portions stay as they are, you may well want more than one side dish per person.

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Dessert for both of us is a chocolate mousse tart on a crushed pecan base served with salted caramel ice cream and fresh raspberries (at £3.75, one of the best value dishes of the meal). The tart itself is very good indeed; great textures, excellent flavour from good quality chocolate and a perfect portion to finish the meal. The salted caramel ice cream has a properly salty punch, a nice change from many that are far too sweet with hardly a hint of salt. The fresh raspberries finish it off perfectly. We both enjoy dessert enormously, perhaps the joint winner of the evening alongside the crispy pig cheek starter.

Some of the niggles on presentation and portion size will no doubt get ironed out after a few more weeks of service. With two drinks each the bill with service, comes to £140; at £70 a head that feels a little high even taking into account the hotel location and the professional service from well-trained staff. That said, it’s a really rather lovely setting, and perfect for a romantic meal or a low-key celebration.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Dalloway Terrace.

 

Already well-established in Brixton and Shoreditch, chef-owner Robin Freeman’s Bukowski Grill has just opened its third branch in the heart of Soho. The latest location sits amid the trendy coffee shops, juice bars and restaurants along d’Arblay Street.

The menu is inpired by an American diner, with classic dishes such as burgers, ribs, chicken wings and sandwiches, all showcasing good quality British produce. During the week, a breakfast menu is also available, on the weekend that expands to a brunch offering.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-124455 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8113

Decor is modern industrial (unfinished ceilings and floors, painted walls), and spacious – the chairs are far more comfortable than they look and tables are nicely spread out rather than on top of each other. There’s a view into the open kitchen a the back and the bar runs along one side of the room.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8117 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8116

The drinks menu is a good one; Pete enjoys a pint of Meantime’s Yakima Red on draft (£5 a pint) and I’m pretty sure that no other cocktail I try this year is going to top the frozen cherry bo (£6) from a very affordable cocktail list – bourbon, cherry and vanilla in a slushie format, this is utterly marvellous and I could happily while away a summer afternoon getting progressively happier on this!

The spiked milkshakes appeal too; dulce the leche and kahlua peanut butter or banana and bourbon or chocolate and rum (£5.95 each). That first one is on my list to try next time we visit.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8122 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-125638

Our first starter is puck nuggets with kimchi remoulade (£5.95). To remove the guesswork for you, puck = pork and duck, though I imagine it’s also a play on the puck shape of these treats. Soft, soft pulled meat has been bound in a spicy sauce, then crumbed and deep-fried and is utterly delicious, with or without the accompanying dip. When I say spicy, I mean it, by the way. But then again, I’m a chilli wuss!

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-125531 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8126 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-130330

We also enjoy a half rack of baby back pork ribs with spicy red onions and pickles (£6.15) which are again, very good. The classic barbeque marinade has a more gentle kick of heat than the puck nuggets, the meat is beautifully cooked – tender but not pappy – and the accompanying onions and pickled gherkin are spot on.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8133 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8140

Burgers are the draw here, so we go for two and share. The fat gringo (£9.95) includes a beef patty, Monterrey jack cheese, candied bacon, jalapeno mustard, red onions, tomato, lettuce and a smoked pickled gherkin. Like all of the burgers it’s served in a brioche bun, though you can switch bun for salad if you prefer.

The flavour combination is excellent, and the ratio of all the elements is just right – that jalapeno mustard against the sweet bacon is the big hit. It’s a bit of a shame to be asked whether we want the patty cooked medium or well done (we choose medium) and then have that ignored but since the patty remains juicy, it’s a minor disappointment.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8128 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8137

Burger number 2 is the bourbon bbq chicken (£6.95) which features grilled marinated free-range chicken breast, lettuce, tomatoes, mayo and a bourbon bbq sauce. I’m super impressed at how moist the chicken breast is; so often far too dry. The flavours are once again, excellent, and the brioche bun holds together well.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8145 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8135

Prices for burgers don’t include sides, which makes the price of the fat gringo a little steep; it comes in at £12.70 with a side of plain skinny fries.

We go for beef dripping potatoes (£3.50) and chilli cheese fries with sour cream and coriander (£4.95), both of which are great choices, if a little too much between two – if you’re having starters, one of these between two is plenty!

The beef dripping potatoes are essentially deep-fried roasties, and absolutely everything I’d ever want in a roast potato! Super texture, super flavour, all round magnificent!

The chilli con carne served on the fries has a classic chilli flavour and texture (not too sloppy, but not dry either) and is a great match with the fries – my main suggestion for improvement would be to serve the fries in a wider and shallower dish, allowing the topping to be spread across more of them. Add a small extra pot of sour cream too and these would be perfect.

Oh and I must give a shout out to the condiments, all home made. The pickles are super but so too is the homemade tomato ketchup on every table – sweet, a hint of chilli and delicious.

Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8148 Bukowski Grill Soho - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8151

Shared dessert is chocolate pot with rum raisin cream (£3.50), a well-sized pot of rich and tasty chocolate mousse topped generously with whipped cream and rum-soaked raisins. Lovely to have smaller desserts available for a sweet note after such a filling meal.

We both really like Bukowski Grill. The food is good, that’s certain. But I also like the space itself, welcoming without being achingly hipster, and friendly service too.

We’ll certainly be back – I want to try the buffalo cauliflower fritters, the smoked chicken wings, the swaledale lamb cutlets with smokey chilli jelly and the smokey beast burger – a beef patty topped with smoked pulled pork, smokey honey and a chipotle bbq sauce.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Bukowski Grill Soho.

Square Meal

 

It’s probably no secret to friends and readers that I have a strong interest in Japan; most especially when it comes to the food. Some might even (and do) call it an obsession.

In fact, Pete and I are heading back there in a few weeks for trip number three, and I’m really, really, really excited!

So when new cookery books on the cuisine are released, I’m always keen to take a look. This one has been out a few months and already has some excellent reviews.

Tokyo Cult Recipes cover

The title of Tokyo Cult Recipes threw me at first – to me it implied that the content would focus only on dishes that had achieved some kind of cult status; the coolest kids on the block, so to speak. In fact, author Maori Murota (who now lives in France) covers a wide range of everyday dishes covering both home-cooking and the kind of food more commonly eaten out, basing her recipes on memories of growing up in Tokyo and also her mother’s cooking.

Although there is certainly a lot of regionally specific cooking in Japan, the majority of these recipes will be familiar to anyone who has travelled in Japan, both to Tokyo and beyond.

The ‘Cult Recipes’ title identifies the book as part of a series; it’s third in the list after New York Cult Recipes and Venice Cult Recipes, also published by Murdoch Books.

Recipes are divided into six chapters, based on the type of meal a dish is most commonly associated with.

A traditional Japanese breakfast usually includes rice, miso soup, tsukemono (pickles), fish and eggs. The Asa Teishoku (breakfast) chapter starts with lessons on some of the cornerstones of the Japanese diet – rice, dashi (stock), miso – before sharing recipes for simple tsukemono, tamago yaki (the densely rolled omelette that is also often served at the end of a sushi meal), salted fish, fresh tofu with two different sauces, and for the brave amongst us, the preparation of natto – magnificently pungent fermented soy beans.

Lunch at home is usually dishes that are ‘simple to make and quick to eat’. The Ohiru (lunch) chapter includes donburi (different toppings over a bowl of rice) and noodle dishes. Recipes for zaru soba (cold buckwheat noodles with a dipping sauce), curry udon (noodles in a curry soup), tempura don (a selection of tempura over on rice) and maguro avocado don (marinated tuna and avocado with rice) are straightforward but adventurous cooks may be drawn to the recipe for making soba noodles from scratch, with step-by-step photographs provided. Some dishes, such as ramen (with broths that can take hours to make) and yakisoba (fried noodles) may more commonly be eaten out, but of course they are made at home too. Modern Tokyo has embraced washoku (western cuisine); spaghetti napolitan the Japanese way is a well-loved example as is tonkatsu (panko-breaded and fried pork cutlets), here shared in popular sando (sandwich) form.

Oyakodon Chicken and Omelette on Rice - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7867 Oyakodon Chicken and Omelette on Rice - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7871
Oyakodon Chicken and Omelette on Rice - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7875

My favourite recipe in this chapter is oyako don (rice with chicken and omelette). Murota doesn’t mention that the Japanese name translates as parent-and-child – a reference to the use of both chicken and egg. Chicken and leeks are cooked with dashi, soy, mirin and eggs and transferred hot from the pan over bowls of rice. This recipe transported me straight to Japan on the first mouthful and is one we’ll certainly make again and again.

Bento boxes have become well known across the world; the simple box-packed lunch transformed almost into an art form by Japanese creativity and presentation. As Murota explains, a typical bento contains some protein, fresh or pickled vegetables and rice. bento are enjoyed by workers, children and travellers – indeed each major train station offers its own speciality ekiben (station bento) that are perfect to enjoy during the journey. Of course, the recipes in this chapter can be made for bento boxes or a regular meal at the table. Hourenso no goma-ae (spinach with sesame sauce), ebi no kousai-ae (prawns with coriander), tsukune (chicken meatballs, also popular on skewers, as yakitori), saba no tatsuga-age (deep-fried marinated mackerel), pickled cucumber and a variety of side vegetables and salads are followed by a selection of onigiri (rice balls, often with stuffing inside).

Oyatsu (snacks) are predominantly sweet, with both yougashi (Western-inspired cakes) and wagashi (traditional Japanese sweets) very popular. Wagashi shared in this chapter include another personal favourite, mitarashi dango (chewy balls made of rice flour served in a sweet salty soy sauce syrup), sweet potato cakes and dorayaki (pancakes filled with adzuki red bean paste). Yougashi infuse European cakes and desserts with Japanese flavours; matcha and white chocolate cake, purin (crème caramel), coffee roll cake, strawberry short cake and ice creams flavoured with black sesame, matcha or adzuki.

Izakaya are best described as Japanese pubs that serve a range of small dishes alongside drinks. Here, Murota shares some well known items such as edamame (fresh soy beans), agedashi tofu (deep fried cubes of tofu served in a thin sauce), a couple of chazuke dishes (rice with hot tea), kara-age (fried chicken), and some less well known ideas like asari no sakamushi (sake-steamed clams), furofuki daikon (simmered white radish), oden (a Japanese winter stew in which a selection of foods are simmered in a simple stock) and lotus root fritters.

The last chapter in the book is Uchishoku; home cooking. This includes a wide range of different dishes; a range of gyoza (dumplings) with different fillings, nibuta chashu (anise simmered pork) and stir fried pork, omuraisu (an omelette filled with rice and often served with either ketchup or another condiment over the top), roll kyabetsu (Japanese stuffed cabbage). This chapter also includes a wide range of simmered dishes such as sukiyaki (beef and other ingredients simmered in a slightly sweet stock), tonyu nabe (a soy milk hotpot) and the very homely nikujaga (simmered beef and potatoes), which we made recently – although our sauce didn’t reduce as much as expected, the flavours once again transported us to Japan. Sushi and sashimi plates are also included here.

The book is interspersed not only with beautiful photographs of the recipes, but also evocative images of Tokyo – people and places, specialist food producers and shop and restaurant owners. At the end of the first chapter is a photo-essay on Tokyo’s famous Tsukiji Market, home to the largest fish market in the world. The second chapter closes with an introduction to sampuru, the super-expensive plastic food replicas that are displayed by many restaurants – did you know that the term comes from the English word sample? The bento chapter gives us photos of a traditional senbei (rice cracker) shop, with images showing how they are made as well as displayed for sale. Within the snacks chapter you’ll find one photo-essay on confectionary plus another on crèpe stalls, a popular Tokyo street snack. The izakaya chapter showcases a lovely selection of traditional ceramics as well as some charming photographs of Tokyo izakaya; indeed several of the recipe images look to be taken in such establishments. The final recipe chapter takes us to Kappabashi Dori, a street famous for its many kitchenware shops.

This is appropriate, as the last section of the book is the Appendices, where Murota shares advice on utensils and ingredients, plus a final few recipes for sauces, dressings and pickling liquids.

I have permission to share two recipes with you, so keep your eyes peeled for Murota’s Sukiyaki (beef hot pot) and her Matcha & White Chocolate Cake, both coming soon now published on Kavey Eats.

In the meantime, here’s an opportunity for you to win your own copy of this lovely book:

GIVEAWAY

In the meantime, Murdoch Books are offering two copies of Tokyo Cult Recipes for a Kavey Eats reader giveaway. Each prize includes delivery to UK addresses.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
What’s your favourite Japanese food and which recipe from Murota’s book (see review above) would you most like to make?

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow both @Kavey on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win Tokyo Cult Recipes published by @murdochbooksuk from Kavey Eats! http://bit.ly/KaveyEatsTCR #KaveyEatsTCR
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle at the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

RULES, TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 18th March 2016.
  • The two winners will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • Each prize is a copy of Tokyo Cult Recipes by Maori Murota, published by Murdoch Books. Delivery to UK addresses is included.
  • The prizes cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, entrants must be following both @Kavey at the time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check relevant accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Kavey Eats received a review copy from Murdoch Books. Tokyo Cult Recipes by Maori Murota is currently available on Amazon for £13.60 (RRP £20). Published by Murdoch Books, photography by Akiko Ida and Pierre Javelle.

The winners of the giveaway copies were Urvashi and Janie, both blog comment entries.

 

Named for the twin brothers who founded it, Joseph Joseph is a British success story, founded in 2003 and now selling in over 100 countries around the world.

The houseware brand is perhaps best known for its super-durable chopping boards (both folding ones that angle into a chute for easy transfer to the cooking pot and colour-coded preparation ones) that are one of its core product ranges. Today Joseph Joseph also manufacture food storage (both for the kitchen and on the go), microwave cookware, all kinds of kitchen tools (from bowls and dishes to measuring cups, jugs and scales to scissors and knives to graters and peelers) and a wide selection of cooking and cleaning utensils.

Their entire range is very much design-led with thought given to practical functionality, durability and looks.

Over the last few weeks Pete and I have been putting a few Joseph Joseph products to the test and have been really impressed by each of those aspects.

Index Regular Chopping Board Set Index Steel Chopping Board Set 3
Index Steel Chopping Board Set 4 Index Steel Chopping Board Set 5

Index chopping boards are colour-coded to help prevent cross-contamination – red for meat, blue for fish, green for vegetables and white for cooked food. Each of the boards have non-slip feet and additional clever touches that make using them a pleasure – a channel around the meat board collects any escaping juices; fish are discouraged from sliding about the board by a strip of textured surface along the centre.

All four boards are easily stored in a space-saving upright box from which they can easily be pulled out and best of all, they are dishwasher safe too.

For small kitchens, the Index Mini offers a similarly colour-coded set in a smaller size. Also great for caravans or keen cooks who like to travel with a set of kitchen essentials when they go on holiday.

Cut and carve 2 Cut and carve 1 Cut and carve 3

The Cut & Carve board has one smooth side that can be used as a normal chopping board, but it’s the other side that has earned it a permanent place in our kitchen – spikes in the centre of the board hold meat in place as you carve and the surface is slightly sloped with a generous lip to catch juices, which can then easily be poured from the corner straight into pan to make gravy! Of course, it’s also good for cutting other foods that have a tendency to leak (fresh mozzarella) or create a surfeit of crumbs (bread).

Elevate 1 Elevate 2
Elevate 3 Elevate 4

Elevate utensils have a stand integrated into the handle so you can rest them on the worktop without the food-dipped end touching the surface. These can be purchased in a set with a carousel stand, or individually. The two we chose have become well-used tools.

The products above are the ones we’ve been testing ourselves. They’re really practical to use, they’re dishwasher proof, they feel really durable and the clever design touches make using them a very positive experience.

There are many other Joseph Joseph products that catch my eye, from the cleverly nesting set of bowls and measuring cups to the dimpled ice cream scoop, and of course, the ones I’ve picked to giveaway to one lucky reader, below.

Twist and grate 2 Twist and grate 3 Twist and grate 1

The Twist Grater has two different stainless steel grating blades. When the handle is straight, use to grate straight above a dish or container; twist the handle to hold the grater firmly against the work surface. It comes in three colours and with a choice of three blade pairs – coarse and fine, extra coarse and ribbon or star and extra fine.

 

GIVEAWAY

Joseph Joseph are offering a reader of Kavey Eats a regular size Index colour-coded chopping board set (top, £50) and a green coarse and fine Twist Grater (above, £20). Delivery to UK and EU addresses is included.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
What kind of cook are you in the kitchen? Tell me about your cooking style and skills in the comments section below.

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow both @Kavey and @JosephJoseph on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win fabulous @JosephJoseph prizes from Kavey Eats! http://bit.ly/KaveyEatsJJ #KaveyEatsJosephJoseph
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle at the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

RULES, TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 18th March 2016.
  • The winner will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • The prize is offered and provided by Joseph Joseph.
  • The prize is a regular size Index colour-coded chopping board set and a green coarse and fine Twist Grater. Delivery to UK and EU addresses is included.
  • The prize cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, entrants must be following both @Kavey and @josephjoseph at the time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check relevant accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

 

Kavey Eats received review products from Joseph Joseph. As always, all opinions 100% honest.We recommend only products we truly believe in.

The winner of this giveaway was Frances Darvill, who entered via a blog comment.

 

I rarely visit new restaurants within a week of opening. I’m never in a mad rush to be first; I tend to plan my diary in advance – I’m not a short notice kind of girl; new places don’t always cross my radar until they’ve already built up quite a buzz. But Galley restaurant and bar caught my eye amongst the flutter of press releases into my Inbox and as soon as I read the menu, I put my hand up to accept an invitation to review. After a soft launch weekend, it opened officially on Tuesday 2nd and we visited the same Friday.

In a prime location on Islington’s Upper Street, not far from Angel tube station, Galley is in a sea of restaurants along a street of little else. Clearly there’s custom enough for all – everywhere was rowdy crowdy, Galley included.

Summarising that tempting press release, Galley is a restaurant and bar ‘specialising in small and large international plates with a strong focus on fish’, founded by siblings Oriona Robb and Marcel Grzyb. Oriona put her styling experience to good use designing the interior while Marcel’s focus is on the menu – now cooking in his own place after 18 years at Randall & Aubin, the last 10 of which as head chef.

galley small interior galley Banquette shot
Images provided by restaurant

I’m late to arrive, so rush to meet Pete at our table in rather a fluster but it doesn’t take long for me to settle in and start to take in the interior. It’s a beautiful space that skillfully balances vintage elegance with a modern aesthetic; the bar sits near the entrance, then a few much-coveted booths before a banquette of tables opposite an open kitchen with a handful of counter seats.

My only bitch is that tables along the banquette are very close together indeed, making me feel uncomfortably voyeuristic towards our neighbours. Perhaps that’s why there’s a banging soundtrack of which, once the place is full, we can hear only the pounding bass; all melody is lost in the babble.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7976 Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7978

Having only recently discovered I like gin, after decades thinking otherwise, I love that a whole page of the drinks menu is dedicated to Gin & Tonic. I choose G’Vine Floraison with Fever-Tree Mediterranean Tonic and frozen grapes (£14) which is wonderful. And yes I pick out and eat the grapes too!

With it I try just one Crispy Tempura Oyster (£3 each). It’s delicious but, goodness me, it’s a teeny tiny little thing – you can just see it peeping out from behind the sauce and garnish there. Not quite a satisfying mouthful, I’m afraid.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7982 Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7984

There are several seafood starters that appeal, including Octopus & Chorizo a la plancha with white bean purée, smoked garlic pesto (£9), Hand-picked Cornish Crab on crostini with smoked garlic aioli, confit tomatoes (£9.5) and Hand Dived In-Shell Scottish Scallops with carrot, cardamom purée, toasted hazelnuts (£9) but in the end we pick two of the non-fish options.

Wookey Hole Cheddar & Ham Hock Croquettes  with harissa mayonnaise (£7) are generously sized, served hot out of the fryer, great texture inside and out. The flavour from cheese and ham is a little milder than I’d like but the harissa mayonnaise makes up for that well enough.

The Hereford Beef Carpaccio with wild mushrooms, beef jelly, pistachio, parmesan (£10) is the definite winner – soft, well-textured beef with fabulous little cubes of vinegared beef jelly, a selection of properly cleaned and delicious wild mushrooms, shavings of parmesan, rocket leaves and roasted pistachio nuts; far more interesting than the usual beef, cheese, leaves and olive oil cliché.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7986 Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7992

The Scottish Venison with smoked potato purée, braised cabbage, thyme gravy (£21.5) is not at all what Pete was picturing – venison three ways rather than a single steak; while I’m not a fan of menus that provide an essay on every dish, more information on this one would have been welcome. All three ways are delicious, full of flavour and with a decent gamey flavour often lacking in farmed venison. I’ve no idea on provenance but it’s tasty meat.

We also follow our waitress’ suggestion that the venison dish needs a side (though on arrival, we don’t think it does). In any case, the Chargrilled Purple Sprouting Broccoli with crispy onions, lemon oil (£5) is a good choice, the broccoli still with some bite in the stems but not too much and a nice flavour from char, onions and oil.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7988

My main of Pan-fried Sea Bass, gnocchi, peas, courgettes, wild mushrooms, truffle oil (£19.5) is delicious! The kitchen have not stinted on that truffle oil, indeed it’s the dominant flavour so if you’re not a fan, ask for less. I love it against the soft fish, crisp fish skin and pillowy gnocchi. The thick sauce of peas, courgettes and mushrooms is just right too. Simple, confident, tasty cooking that is absolutely worth coming back for.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7997

With such success on the starters and mains, it’s hard to resist trying the desserts, though I can’t say we really need them, full as we are.

The Salted Caramel Tart with green tea ice cream, chilli & hazelnut praline (£7) is super rich, silky smooth and sinfully sweet though with a clear bitter caramel flavour in the background and a touch of salt to make everything pop. The green tea ice cream is insipid though, very little green tea flavour discernable.

Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7995 Galley Restaurant Islington on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-8001

My pick of the two desserts is the Amaretto & Verona Chocolate Fondant with cherry compote, mascarpone vanilla ice cream (£7), served hot and gushing hot molten chocolate when I cut it open. The amaretto flavour is clear but not overwhelming and lovely with the sweet chocolate and sharp cherries. Once again the ice cream is rather bland, though in this case that’s no bad thing as it’s simply a cooling hit of dairy against the rich pudding.

It’s been a super meal and one that certainly has me itching to come back – virtually every dish on the menu appeals and there is a tempting Sunday brunch menu too. Prices are very reasonable for food of this calibre in London – that runs through to the drinks, with bottles of wine starting at just £20 and cocktails all priced at £9.50.

It’s hard to judge service so early on when everyone’s peachy keen, excited and enthusiastic – certainly staff seem on the ball already and eager for customers to enjoy their visit. I’m sure the front of house team will continue smiling for the foreseeable; hopefully I’ll be back before too long to check for myself.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Galley Restaurant & Bar.

Galley Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Square Meal

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