PetecourgettePete came into the house one recent Monday evening with an overgrown courgette from the back garden, brandishing it in the manner of a cartoon caveman and his trusty club.

The quiche he made with half of it the next evening was so fantastic that I begged him to make it again the next night. Begged!

My cries went unheeded for three whole days! He made me wait till Friday before he gave in and made it again. And yes, it was just as delicious.

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Be warned though, even though the courgette is salted and squeezed out before cooking, it still releases moisture during cooking and creates a bit of a soggy bottom. Mary Berry might not approve but it didn’t bother us a bit!

 

Pete’s Courgette, Blue Cheese & Cherry Tomato Quiche

Ingredients
1 packet (320 grams) ready rolled shortcrust pastry
500g grated courgette
100g blue cheese (we used Stilton but any good blue will be fine)
2 large eggs
200ml single cream
Handful cherry tomatoes

Note: of course you can make your own shortcrust pastry, or buy it in block format and roll it yourself. From a 320 gram packet, there will be a little leftover, which you could use to make jam tarts or individual pies.

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 200 °C (fan).
  • Line an 9 inch (23 cm) flan dish with the pastry. The rolled sheet will be slightly too narrow so cut off one end and use to complete the circle.
  • Line with foil or parchment, fill with baking beads (or rice) and blind bake until golden; about 15-20 minutes/
  • Grate the courgette, add a teaspoon of salt, mix well and leave to drain in a sieve or muslin draining bag for about an hour.

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  • Once the tart case is baked, remove from the oven and set aside to cool down.
  • When ready to assemble and bake the quiche, preheat the oven to 170 °C (fan).
  • Crumble the blue cheese across the base.

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  • Squeeze as much water as you can from the grated courgette and layer over the blue cheese.

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  • Beat the eggs and cream together.
  • Pour the eggs and cream gently over the courgette  and blue cheese.
  • Halve the cherry tomatoes and place onto the tart, cut face up.

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  • Bake for 30-40 minutes until the filling has firmed up and taken on a little golden brown colour.

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  • Best enjoyed hot but can also be served warm or cold.

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For more courgette recipes on Kavey Eats see:

For courgette inspiration from others, see my suggestions at the bottom of this post.

 

We are experiencing a glorious courgette glut at the moment, as you may have guessed! We’ve had courgette frittata, courgette soup and courgettes stuffed with sausage ragu… and courgette crisps, courgette-saka, grilled courgettes, stir-fried courgette… we even tried a chocolate courgette cake but that one’s not for sharing as we didn’t love the recipe we tried. We’ll be having another go, though! We still have plenty of courgettes to enjoy – green baton shapes and yellow globe ones.

Like most people, some evenings we are too tired or short of time to make anything fancy but want to resist the easy temptation of a takeaway or ready-meal.

Using ready-made, ready-rolled puff pastry as the base of a quick and easy tart makes for a tasty dinner, and one that can easily be adapted to seasonal ingredients.

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On this occasion, we used fresh mozzarella but you could also use a soft goat’s cheese or a brie or camembert-style cheese. A little blue cheese is a very tasty addition too.

Likewise, you can certainly use different herbs or spices. Za’atar, the Lebanese blend of wild thyme, sumac and sesame seeds, works particularly well with courgettes.

Try not to make your layer of toppings too deep, however, or they won’t cook through in the time it takes for the pastry to puff up and brown.

Puff Pastry Cheese, Courgette & Mint Tart

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 sheet ready-rolled puff pastry (all butter is the tastiest)
250-300 grams soft cheese of your choice, thinly sliced
1 medium baton courgette, very thinly sliced
Fresh mint, or your choice of herbs or spices
Salt and pepper

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Method

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C (fan).
  • Cut the unrolled sheet of pastry onto 2 or 4 pieces. (We cut ours into two, but each tart was enough for two people).
  • Very lightly score a border around each piece, about 1.5 – 2 cm in from the edge. Take care not to cut right through the pastry.
  • Within the border area of each piece of pastry, lay out a layer of soft cheese.
  • Top with an overlapping layer of courgette pieces.

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  • Sprinkle with herbs or spices.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes until the pastry is risen and golden brown.
  • Serve hot.

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For more courgette recipe inspiration, please see the list at the bottom of my Sausage Ragu Stuffed Courgettes recipe post.

 

I love the courgette season!

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Many home gardeners and allotmenteers love growing courgettes as these summer squashes are easy to look after and usually give an abundant harvest. But it’s surprising how many don’t like eating them as much as they do growing them; they give most of their bounty away. Of course, I am happy to share a few gorgeous courgettes with friends – it’s a lovely feeling giving someone home grown produce picked from the plant moments before. But Pete and I love eating courgettes so it’s very much a case of finding as many ways as possible to enjoy them while they last.

We like to grow different varieties. For many years, we’ve grown yellow spherical courgettes – they taste the same as green ones but look, they’re just so beautiful! We have also grown green balls and both green and yellow varieties of the regular baton shape. I’m thinking about planting some of the pale green or white types next year.

By the way, while we use the French word courgette, the Americans took the word zucchini from Italian, which seems appropriate since courgettes were developed in Italy after the Cucurbita genus was introduced to Europe from the Americas. That said, Americans now seem to refer to yellow courgettes by the umbrella term of summer squash rather than as yellow zucchini, I’m not really sure why.

Any courgette / zucchini variety can be used for this recipe, but it’s best to choose smaller fruits rather than large ones.

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Sausage Ragu Stuffed Courgettes

Serves 3-4

Note: My photos show three halved courgettes, but we had enough leftover ragu to stuff a fourth courgette the next day. Exact portions will depend on the size of courgettes used.

Ingredients
Vegetable oil, for cooking
1 small onion, diced
400 grams (1 tin) chopped tomatoes
2 teaspoons fresh oregano, finely chopped (or 1 teaspoon dried)
600 grams herby pork sausages, skin removed
Salt and pepper, to taste
3-4 small courgettes, halved and scooped out
125 grams (1 ball) fresh mozzarella, sliced
Fresh oregano, to garnish

Tip: Read the instructions before starting – you can prep the sausages, courgettes and mozzarella while other elements of the recipe are cooking.

Method

  • Heat a little vegetable oil in a large frying pan and cook the onion over a low to medium heat, to soften.

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  • Add the tinned tomatoes and oregano and let the tomato sauce cook. You can peel the sausages during this time.

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  • Add the sausages to the tomato sauce and use the edge of a wooden spoon to break them into pieces. Continue to break the sausages down, mixing them into the tomato sauce, for the first several minutes of cooking.

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  • Then cover the pan and leave the ragu to cook for about an hour. During this cooking time, once the sausage is cooked through you can taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper as needed.

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  • After an hour, remove the lid and turn the heat up a little to allow the sauce to reduce – this will take about 10 to 15 minutes. You want quite a dry ragu, as the courgettes will release juices as they cook. Prepare the courgettes during this time.

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  • To prepare the courgettes, slice them in half and carefully scoop out the seeds and pulpy flesh from the centre. Leave a nice thick layer of flesh in the skin, and take care not to pierce the skin while you’re working.

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  • Preheat the oven to 160° C (fan).
  • Stuff the courgettes with the ragu and pack down tightly.

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  • Bake the courgettes for 30 to 40 minutes until the courgettes have softened and the ragu has taken on a little colour.

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  • Slice the mozzarella finely and arrange over the top of each courgette half. Add a sprig of fresh oregano for decoration, if using.

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  • Return to the oven and bake for another 15-20 minutes, until the mozzarella has melted and taken on a little colour.

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  • Serve with your chosen side. You can see that we had some of ours with an extra dose of courgettes in the form of courgette crisps – thinly sliced, lightly floured and deep fried!

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Looking for more delicious ideas for courgettes / zucchinis?

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Do you have any favourite recipes for courgettes?

If so, please do share them here – we still have lots more on the plants and I’m always looking for new ways to enjoy them!

(You are welcome to include recipe links in your comments, but they may not appear straight away; comments with links are usually diverted into an approval queue to check they aren’t spam!)

 

I guess I’m like a kid with a new toy at the moment. Here’s another power blender recipe for you, made once again in my Froothie Optimum 9400 blender.

We’re in the midst of a courgette glut (something I’m very happy about as I love them and feel rather sad in those occasional years when our harvest fails). This quick and tasty soup recipe is a great way to use courgettes. It’s also the perfect choice for the courgettes you failed to spot and which grew a bit larger than you intended; of course, you can make it with smaller courgettes too!

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Quick Courgette & Blue Cheese Soup | Made in a Power Blender

Serves 2

Ingredients
850 grams roughly diced courgette (weight after removing ends and scooping out seeds)
75-100 grams strong blue cheese
30-50 ml double cream
Salt and pepper, to taste

Method

  • Place courgette into blender jug. Pulse until courgette has been liquidised. You may need to pause between pulsing once or twice to shake the jug, and help distribute the courgette to within the blade’s reach. Don’t be tempted to add water, as it’s not necessary (and you don’t want to water down the flavour of your finished soup).
  • Once the courgette has been liquidised, add the blue cheese and cream and switch on the blender, ramping it up to the highest speed.
  • Leave it running for 6-7 minutes until the soup is piping hot.
  • Taste and add seasoning, blend for another few seconds and taste again.
  • Serve immediately.
  • Great with fresh bread or toast.

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Check out these posts for more great power blender soup recipes:

 

Kavey Eats received an Optimum 9400 blender from Froothie. Kavey Eats is a member of the Froothie brand ambassador programme, but under no obligation to share positive reviews. All opinions published on Kavey Eats are 100% honest feedback.

Special Offer: For an additional 2 years warranty free of charge on any Optimum appliance purchased, follow this link, choose your Optimum product and enter coupon code “Special Ambassador Offer” on checkout.

 

For July’s #BSFIC I asked you to take inspiration from holiday memories.

Here are the delicious ideas you came up with:

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Jo at Comfort Bites took inspiration for her grown up Coffee and Cinnamon Ice Cream from a holiday in Argentina.

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Kate, blogger behind What Kate Baked, considered lots of ideas before settling on this USA-inspired Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough No Churn Ice Cream.

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Sarah at The School of Balance created a Monkey Nut Dairy Free Vegan Ice Cream after a visit to the New York ice cream shop formerly known as Lula’s Sweet Apothecary.

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Stephen at All Things Speculaas has shared his wife Debbie’s Speculaas Ice Cream, based on the flavours of a biscuit traditionally enjoyed during the Christmas holidays.

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Corina at Searching For Spice remembered childhood holidays to Spain when creating her wonderfully vibrant Blackcurrant Frozen Yoghurt.

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Kate, the Gluten Free Alchemist, created these rather impressive Raspberry Ripple-White Chocolate Coconut Milk Ice-Cream Bars & Bites, thinking back to childhood summer holidays.

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My own entry was a Jungle Juice Sorbet inspired by a Jungle Juice Smoothie I encountered on safari holidays in Southern Africa.

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Amy, who writes Cooking, Cakes & Children, has made this beautiful Chocolate Caramel Ice Cream Roll in homage to memories of eating Arctic roll in the back garden during the summer holidays.

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Cheeky Dom at Belleau Kitchen didn’t make the Buffalo Milk Ice Cream he shared in his post about a very recent trip to Italy but he did enjoy it!

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Hannah, who’s just saying goodbye to the Corner Cottage Baker, harked back to childhood holidays with her grown up Boozy Ice Cream Floats.

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Shaheen, who writes A Seasonal Veg Table, made this bright Raw Vegan Raspberry Ice-Cream with vibrant Scottish raspberries.

Choclette, author of Chocolate Log Blog, remembered childhood visits to Switzerland when she made this Chocolate Sundae Royale.

 

A great round up, I hope you’ll agree.

August’s #BSFIC is joining forces with the Belleau Kitchen Random Recipes challenge – check it out and do join in!

 

As a late comer to making frittata my enthusiasm for this simple dish is as yet unabated. Its versatility is particularly welcome in this hot and muggy weather – it can serve as breakfast, lunch, dinner or an anytime-snack and is just as good hot or cold. And of course, the variations are endless, making it easy to use different seasonal combinations throughout the year.

Facing the annual courgette glut (a bounty I wholeheartedly welcome), a frittata leapt immediately to mind when thinking of how best to enjoy our harvest.

I love the combination of courgette and mint, and knew a tangy creamy goat’s cheese would balance the sweetness of courgette.

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Courgette, Goat’s Cheese & Mint Frittata

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, for cooking
500 grams courgette, washed and diced into approximately 1 cm cubes
Salt and pepper
Handful mint leaves, washed and finely chopped
6 large eggs, beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper
150 grams of soft goat’s cheese, chopped into small pieces

Method

  • Heat the vegetable oil in large frying pan or sauté pan that is suitable for use on stovetop and under the grill.
  • Add courgettes, seasoning with a generous sprinkle of salt and pepper and the mint leaves.
  • Cook for several minutes until the courgette is cooked all the way through.
  • Switch on your grill to preheat, on a high setting.
  • Pour the beaten egg into the pan and about a third of the goat’s cheese, mix gently and allow to cook for a couple of minutes.
  • Use a spatula to pull the egg in a little from the edges of the pan and cook for another couple of minutes.
  • To check whether the base has set, shake the pan to check whether the frittata is starting to come loose; if it hasn’t, give it another minute or two on the hob.
  • Spread the remaining goat’s cheese across the top of the egg and courgette mix.
  • Transfer the pan to the grill and cook for a few minutes, until the egg has set and the goat’s cheese has taken on some colour.
  • Remove from the grill and give the pan another shake. The frittata should now be loose on the bottom of the pan; if it’s not quite loose, use a spatula to help free it.
  • Place a large plate over the pan and flip to turn the frittata out. I like the goat’s cheese to show on top, so use a second plate to turn it the right way up again.
  • The frittata can be enjoyed piping hot, warm or cold from the fridge. Slice into wedges to serve.

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Here are more great frittata ideas:

What are your favourite ingredients to add into a frittata?

Jul 212014
 

Safari

I love safari! Pete and I are fortunate to have been on several over the last two decades and have particular soft spots for the wildlife parks of Botswana, Kenya and South Africa, to name a few.

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There’s something utterly captivating about observing birds and animals in their natural habitats, up close and personal. Of course, there are the poster animals – sleek and powerful lions and leopards, lithe and speedy cheetahs, elegant-necked loping giraffes, portly hippos, grinning hyenas, wild dogs, buffalo, zebras, wildebeest – all of which are a delight to see.

But we find just as much joy in the smaller or lesser known wildlife – a family of silver-backed jackal pups playing in the dawn light under the watchful gaze of their parents, colourful lilac-breasted rollers or malachite kingfishers taking to the wing in a flash of colour, a fighting gaggle of vultures competing fiercely over the remnants of the latest unfortunate, a sniffling porcupine shuffling through the grass with quills-a-quivering, two bat-eared foxes cautiously poking their heads up from the entrance of their den, blinking bush-babies sitting high in a tree watching us watch them, a dung beetle laboriously rolling his ball of dung along the ground, the shimmer of sunlight against the iridescent plume of a glossy starling or ibis, the striking facial patterns and horns of the mighty oryx, the tight grip of a tiny reed frog clinging to a tall stem jutting out of the waters in the Okavango Delta… There is even excitement to be found in the footprints of animals long since departed, imprinted into the earth and now a challenge to our skills of identification – elephants and lions are much easier than the many ungulates!

Someone once declared that if you’d seen one wrinkly grey elephant’s arse you’d seen them all and he couldn’t see the point of going on more than one safari in one’s life. To say that I was flabbergasted is an understatement!

There are many ways to safari, from budget self-drive to remote luxury camps with private guides. We’ve done and loved both – each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Luxury safari camps are places of such beauty – gorgeous full height canvas tents with comfortable furniture, en-suite bathrooms and open air dining rooms where guests and guides come together for delicious meals. Of course, the focus is the wildlife viewing activities but we certainly enjoy the catering and accommodations in between!

Jungle Juice Memories

It was at one such safari camp that I was first offered Jungle Juice, a jolly name for a mixed fruit smoothie. Usually featuring a banana base with a range of additional fruits depending on what was available, this quickly became a favourite for me, especially as I’m not a wine or beer drinker. Indeed, when we later visited camps that didn’t offer anything similar, I was happy to describe Jungle Juice, and they would kindly rustle some up for me. (In the same way, I have introduced more African safari guides to shandy than I care to think about!)

Of course, as Jungle Juice is simply a mixed fruit no-dairy smoothie, it’s a drink many people make and enjoy.

Jungle Juice Sorbet

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Recently, I was sent an Optimum 9400 Blender by Australian brand Froothie. It’s a super powerful blender, with a very sharp blade which means that as well as making quick work of smoothies and sauces, it can also grind nuts and seeds and crush ice. The powerful motor even allows it to knead dough, and because the blade turns at 48,000 rpm it can generate enough heat to make piping hot soups as well. I’m yet to try these functions, and will report back as I do.

What I can tell you is that the motor and blade make quick work of chunks of frozen fruit and the advantage of blending them straight from frozen is that Jungle Juice becomes Jungle Juice Sorbet!

I make Jungle Juice Sorbet with nothing but fruit – no honey or sugar, no dairy, no oats – so it’s a very healthy alternative to dairy ice creams and sugar-laden sorbets.

For the first few moments, I thought the frozen chunks of banana, pineapple and mango I had thrown into the jug were simply too solid for the blade to handle but after a few tens of seconds more, the blade started to reduce the fruit to a thick cold paste. Pete used the tamper tool provided to push the chunks at the top down nearer the blades and a few minutes later, the sorbet was done.

Of course, you’ll want to eat the sorbet the moment it’s ready, so be prepared and have your bowls, spoons and eager diners ready and waiting.

As there is no added sugar or preservatives, this sorbet is best eaten fresh.

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Jungle Juice Sorbet

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
1-2 bananas, peeled, chopped and frozen
200-300 grams mixed fruits, peeled and chopped (if necessary) and frozen

Note: So that you can make smoothies and sorbets quickly whenever you feel like it, I recommend you keep chunks of frozen fruit ready to hand in your freezer. Banana is best frozen already peeled and chopped, likewise larger fruit such as pineapple and mango. Berries can simply be washed, hulled and frozen as they are. Make sure they’re fairly dry when you put them into the freezer, so the liquid doesn’t cause them to freeze into a solid block.

Method

  • Place your chosen fruit chunks straight from the freezer into your blender. (You’ll need a really robust blender to handle this. Alternatively, a high quality food processor will also work).
  • Blend until the fruit has been broken down into a thick, creamy puree. Pause once or twice to push solid chunks down closer to the blades if necessary.
  • Serve immediately.

This is my entry for July’s #BSFIC challenge – frozen treats inspired by Holiday Memories.

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Kavey Eats received an Optimum 9400 blender from Froothie. Kavey Eats is a member of the Froothie brand ambassador programme, but under no obligation to share positive reviews. All opinions published on Kavey Eats are 100% honest feedback.

Special Offer: For an additional 2 years warranty free of charge on any Optimum appliance purchased, follow this link, choose your Optimum product and enter coupon code “Special Ambassador Offer” on checkout.

 

I’ve shared three Potato Dauphinoise posts on Kavey Eats over the years – the easy recipe I learned at the Waitrose cookery school, a caramelised onion version and a sweet potato and ham Dauphinoise. The original easy recipe also includes a variation substituting chicken stock for the milk, so I guess that’s actually four versions – yes I really do love potato Dauphinoise!

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To celebrate the launch of Rosie Ramsden’s new book The Recipe Wheel her publishers have sent me one of the book’s recipe wheels to share. As you can see, it includes a number of Rosie’s potato gratin dishes – an exploration of how one can adapt a core dish extensively.

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 I thought it would be helpful for to share all my variation recipes in a single place:

Easy Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer the potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Easy Cream & Chicken Stock Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml chicken stock
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • As above, substituting the chicken stock for the milk.

 

Easy Caramelised Onion & Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
3-4 tablespoons sweet and sticky well-caramelised onions (I use ready made)

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer about a third of the potatoes into an oven dish, arranging them so they’re reasonably flat.
  • Spread the caramelised onions evenly across the potatoes.
  • Cover with the remaining slices of potatoes.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Sweet Potato & Ham Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
350 grams sweet potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
150-200 grams regular potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
100-150 grams thick sliced ham, cut into small pieces
Optional: handful of grated cheese

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato and sweet potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until they have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer some of the (mixed) potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat.
  • Scatter some of the ham pieces across them before adding another layer, and continue till all the potatoes and ham are in the oven dish. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • Serve hot.

 

Other recipes you may enjoy:

Creamy Potato, Bacon & Brie Tartiflette on Greedy Gourmet
‘Nduja Gratin on Fuss Free Flavours

 

Kavey Eats received a copy of The Recipe Wheel from Random House.

 

 

With summer finally arriving in full force, June’s #BSFIC theme was fruit.

As always, you shared a wonderful variety of ideas, all of which I wish I could try! (Sorry for the delay in sharing the round up; I was away in Dubrovnik at the end of the month and straight back to work on my return).

Check out July’s challenge here.

Strawberry and rosewater ice cream

Inspired by a cheesecake he made a few years ago, Michael of Me My Food & I turned something ordinary into something special by creating a Strawberry and Rosewater Ice Cream. He’s added a little grenadine and vanilla for extra complexity of flavour, too.

Sudha

Sudha, who writes Spicy, Quirky and Serendipitous, is a great improviser and pulled together her Vegan Coconut Milk Ice Cream with Strawberries after checking out a few coconut milk recipes that could be made without an ice cream machine.

ice-cream sandwich copy

Not only did Helen of Family, Friends, Food create a delicious ice cream but she made it into a sandwich too. Check out her Hazelnut Meringue 3 Berry Ice Cream Sandwich. I particularly love the pretty pink colour of her mixed berry ice cream.

fab ice lolly500px

Elizabeth of Elizabeth’s Kitchen diary has created a fabulous splash of colour by making Home Made Fab Ice Lollies. Inspired by a recipe in Aimee Ryan’s Coconut Milk Ice Cream book, these look way better than the shop-bought version!

It’s obvious that Laura knows How To Cook Food. Just look at her Raspberry Cranachan Ice Cream, taking a classic Scottish dessert and making an ice cream version. What a clever idea!

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Janet, over at The Taste Space, used coconut to create her Chocolate Mint Chip Ice Cream, a refreshing cooler from the humid summer heat in Houston. Several long hours of stirring the freezing mixture every half an hour didn’t produce the texture Janet hoped for so she recommends using an ice cream machine for this recipe.

bsfic paech melba bombe 2

I’m always excited to see what Foodycat Alicia comes up with and was as impressed as usual with her beautiful Peach Melba Bombe. She used a version of MiMi’s cream cheese ice cream base, plus raspberries macerated in Chambord, peach puree and two freezer-proof bowls!

FrozenYoghurt

Julia, who writes Something Missing, has tantalised my taste buds with herTarte au Citron Frozen Yoghurt, in which she adds chopped up pieces of actual lemon tart to her yoghurt and lemon curds base. I really like the idea of chunks of pastry and curd providing texture.

Redcurrant Ice-cream

Choclette, the writer behind the wonderful Chocolate Log Blog, created a very pretty Redcurrant Ripple Ice Cream. She’s balanced the redcurrants with sweet white chocolate and a little vanilla. I keep meaning to do a ripple ice cream, and this gorgeous ice cream inspires me to go for it.

Quick-Easy-Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-800text-6761

For my own entry, I created a creamy Quick & Easy Yuzu Ice Cream using Korean Yuzu Tea and a no churn base. Although this uses just three ingredients, Korean Yuzu Tea, condensed milk and double cream, it’s one of the tastiest ice creams I’ve made.

Banana and Almond Ice Cream

Not only was he the first to enter the challenge (once again), Michael made a second #BSFIC entry with this delicious Banana & Almond Ice Cream inspired by cinema ice cream!

photo

It’s no secret that I adore mangoes so I was always going to be a fan of these Yoghurt Mango Ice Lollies by Lisa from United Cakedom. They look so refreshing!

No-churn-dairy-free-raspberry-ice-cream-recipe-1-imp

Sarah from Maison Cupcake has discovered the joys of blending frozen fruit in a blender for an instant frozen treat, such as this No Churn Diary Free Vegan Raspberry Ice Cream. I’ve just taken delivery of a super powerful blender myself and have been planning a few frozen fruit sorbets and ice creams for the rest of summer too!

Ice-Cream-Terrine-348x450

Nazima, who writes the Franglais Kitchen blog, has created a very pretty Blueberry, Vanilla and Mascarpone Ice Cream Terrine in which she layers rich vanilla mascarpone with a centre of crunchy fruit and almond milk sherbet.

cherryalmond

Kate, the Gluten Free Alchemist, has achieved the most glorious rich purple colour in her Cherry-Almond Coconut Milk Ice Cream. She’s adapted a recipe from Aimee Ryan’s book, Coconut Milk Ice Cream, and it looks beautiful!

IceCreamChallenge

Please get your thinking caps on for July’s #BSFIC challenge, which has a theme of Holiday Memories.

 

It’s rare for us to make cakes the traditional way any more; creaming together butter and sugar, beating in the eggs and folding in the dry ingredients by hand is not only time-consuming but tiring on the arms too. Instead, for the last several years we’ve mixed most cake batters directly in our food processor, which has a permanent home on the kitchen work surface.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6090-text1000 Magimix 4200xl satin

The ingredients are tipped into the bowl, sometimes all together as in my favourite banana cake recipe, sometimes in two or three batches. The blade is very sharp so a few seconds blending is usually all it takes to bring everything together into a batter. Sometimes we need to remove the lid and scrape the sides down once, before a final quick pulse to finish.

The batter is then poured or spooned straight into the cake tin(s) and baked.

Easy peasy and very quick!

Challenged to create a few Brazilian recipes that make good use of my new Magimix 4200 XL, Pete and I made these tasty individual orange and lime cakes, more commonly made as a single larger cake. My previous post was an equally easy recipe for Brazilian Brigadeiro Chocolate Bonbons. For the basic cake batter recipe, we used a recipe by Marian Blazes, an American who has lived and travelled extensively in South America. As it was such a success for the Marzipan Cakes we made over Easter, we made individual cakes rather than one big one, and skipped the glaze altogether.

These are delightful little cakes with a refreshing and vibrant hit of citrus and, as Marian has found, very versatile – you could serve them for breakfast, elevenses, as a packed lunch treat or for afternoon tea.

Usually known as bolo de laranja, orange cake is apparently a popular cake in Brazil. I really like Marian’s combination of orange and lime, and wanted to reflect the use of two citrus fruits in the name. My friend Rosana helped me with translations.

 

Little Orange & Lime Cakes from Brazil | Bolinhos de Laranja e Limão

Makes 10 to 15 individual cakes, depending on size

Ingredients
2 oranges
1 lime
3 eggs (we used large eggs)
60 ml vegetable oil
125 grams butter, melted
300 grams plain white flour
100 grams ground almonds
350 grams sugar
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
0.5 teaspoon salt

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 180 °C (fan).
  • Liberally butter your muffin tins and then sprinkle a little flour over the buttered surfaces.
  • Zest the lime and the oranges.
  • Peel and section the orange, discarding the skin, pitch and membranes between segments. (You could candy the peel if you wish).
  • Juice the lime.
  • Place zest, orange flesh and lime juice into the food processor bowl and blend briefly until smooth.
  • Add the eggs, vegetable oil and melted butter to the processor and blend again until well mixed.
  • Add the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ground almonds to the processor and blend until the batter is smooth. Pause to scrape down the sides of the bowl and blend again briefly, if necessary.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle

  • Spoon or pour the batter into the prepared muffin tins.
  • Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, depending on the size of your muffin tins. The smaller cakes took 25 minutes, the larger ones needed another 5 minutes.
  • Test using a skewer (it should come out clean) or press the surface lightly (it should spring back).

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-4 Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-5

  • When nicely risen, golden brown on top and cooked through, remove from the oven and leave to cool for several minutes in the tins.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-10 Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6093

  • Remove from the tins and allow to cool fully on a wire rack.

Whatever time of day you choose to eat these bright little cakes, I hope you enjoy them!

Our new Magimix 4200 XL is very similar to our older 5200 – the key differences for us are the XL, which denotes the extra wide feed tube, and a slightly smaller footprint. The 4200 XL also comes with a BlenderMix attachment for smoothies and batters, which we’ve yet to try. Like the 5200, it comes with large, medium and mini bowls, a very sharp blade, an egg whisk attachment, a dough hook attachment and a couple of slicing and grating discs.

Other Brazilian recipes which make use of a food processor:

Pão o de Queijo (cheese bread) and Churrasco steak with salsa and rice
Cucumber Caipirinha Cocktail

Kavey Eats received a Magimix 4200 XL from Magimix.

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