As a late comer to making frittata my enthusiasm for this simple dish is as yet unabated. Its versatility is particularly welcome in this hot and muggy weather – it can serve as breakfast, lunch, dinner or an anytime-snack and is just as good hot or cold. And of course, the variations are endless, making it easy to use different seasonal combinations throughout the year.

Facing the annual courgette glut (a bounty I wholeheartedly welcome), a frittata leapt immediately to mind when thinking of how best to enjoy our harvest.

I love the combination of courgette and mint, and knew a tangy creamy goat’s cheese would balance the sweetness of courgette.

text-CourgetteFrittata1_20140719_201417

Courgette, Goat’s Cheese & Mint Frittata

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, for cooking
500 grams courgette, washed and diced into approximately 1 cm cubes
Salt and pepper
Handful mint leaves, washed and finely chopped
6 large eggs, beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper
150 grams of soft goat’s cheese, chopped into small pieces

Method

  • Heat the vegetable oil in large frying pan or sauté pan that is suitable for use on stovetop and under the grill.
  • Add courgettes, seasoning with a generous sprinkle of salt and pepper and the mint leaves.
  • Cook for several minutes until the courgette is cooked all the way through.
  • Switch on your grill to preheat, on a high setting.
  • Pour the beaten egg into the pan and about a third of the goat’s cheese, mix gently and allow to cook for a couple of minutes.
  • Use a spatula to pull the egg in a little from the edges of the pan and cook for another couple of minutes.
  • To check whether the base has set, shake the pan to check whether the frittata is starting to come loose; if it hasn’t, give it another minute or two on the hob.
  • Spread the remaining goat’s cheese across the top of the egg and courgette mix.
  • Transfer the pan to the grill and cook for a few minutes, until the egg has set and the goat’s cheese has taken on some colour.
  • Remove from the grill and give the pan another shake. The frittata should now be loose on the bottom of the pan; if it’s not quite loose, use a spatula to help free it.
  • Place a large plate over the pan and flip to turn the frittata out. I like the goat’s cheese to show on top, so use a second plate to turn it the right way up again.
  • The frittata can be enjoyed piping hot, warm or cold from the fridge. Slice into wedges to serve.

CourgetteFrittata1_20140719_201147 CourgetteFrittata1_20140719_201319

Here are more great frittata ideas:

What are your favourite ingredients to add into a frittata?

Jul 212014
 

Safari

I love safari! Pete and I are fortunate to have been on several over the last two decades and have particular soft spots for the wildlife parks of Botswana, Kenya and South Africa, to name a few.

tomboy (c) Africa 2008-bbb

There’s something utterly captivating about observing birds and animals in their natural habitats, up close and personal. Of course, there are the poster animals – sleek and powerful lions and leopards, lithe and speedy cheetahs, elegant-necked loping giraffes, portly hippos, grinning hyenas, wild dogs, buffalo, zebras, wildebeest – all of which are a delight to see.

But we find just as much joy in the smaller or lesser known wildlife – a family of silver-backed jackal pups playing in the dawn light under the watchful gaze of their parents, colourful lilac-breasted rollers or malachite kingfishers taking to the wing in a flash of colour, a fighting gaggle of vultures competing fiercely over the remnants of the latest unfortunate, a sniffling porcupine shuffling through the grass with quills-a-quivering, two bat-eared foxes cautiously poking their heads up from the entrance of their den, blinking bush-babies sitting high in a tree watching us watch them, a dung beetle laboriously rolling his ball of dung along the ground, the shimmer of sunlight against the iridescent plume of a glossy starling or ibis, the striking facial patterns and horns of the mighty oryx, the tight grip of a tiny reed frog clinging to a tall stem jutting out of the waters in the Okavango Delta… There is even excitement to be found in the footprints of animals long since departed, imprinted into the earth and now a challenge to our skills of identification – elephants and lions are much easier than the many ungulates!

Someone once declared that if you’d seen one wrinkly grey elephant’s arse you’d seen them all and he couldn’t see the point of going on more than one safari in one’s life. To say that I was flabbergasted is an understatement!

There are many ways to safari, from budget self-drive to remote luxury camps with private guides. We’ve done and loved both – each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Luxury safari camps are places of such beauty – gorgeous full height canvas tents with comfortable furniture, en-suite bathrooms and open air dining rooms where guests and guides come together for delicious meals. Of course, the focus is the wildlife viewing activities but we certainly enjoy the catering and accommodations in between!

Jungle Juice Memories

It was at one such safari camp that I was first offered Jungle Juice, a jolly name for a mixed fruit smoothie. Usually featuring a banana base with a range of additional fruits depending on what was available, this quickly became a favourite for me, especially as I’m not a wine or beer drinker. Indeed, when we later visited camps that didn’t offer anything similar, I was happy to describe Jungle Juice, and they would kindly rustle some up for me. (In the same way, I have introduced more African safari guides to shandy than I care to think about!)

Of course, as Jungle Juice is simply a mixed fruit no-dairy smoothie, it’s a drink many people make and enjoy.

Jungle Juice Sorbet

Jungle-Juice-Sorbet-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-text-highres

Recently, I was sent an Optimum 9400 Blender by Australian brand Froothie. It’s a super powerful blender, with a very sharp blade which means that as well as making quick work of smoothies and sauces, it can also grind nuts and seeds and crush ice. The powerful motor even allows it to knead dough, and because the blade turns at 48,000 rpm it can generate enough heat to make piping hot soups as well. I’m yet to try these functions, and will report back as I do.

What I can tell you is that the motor and blade make quick work of chunks of frozen fruit and the advantage of blending them straight from frozen is that Jungle Juice becomes Jungle Juice Sorbet!

I make Jungle Juice Sorbet with nothing but fruit – no honey or sugar, no dairy, no oats – so it’s a very healthy alternative to dairy ice creams and sugar-laden sorbets.

For the first few moments, I thought the frozen chunks of banana, pineapple and mango I had thrown into the jug were simply too solid for the blade to handle but after a few tens of seconds more, the blade started to reduce the fruit to a thick cold paste. Pete used the tamper tool provided to push the chunks at the top down nearer the blades and a few minutes later, the sorbet was done.

Of course, you’ll want to eat the sorbet the moment it’s ready, so be prepared and have your bowls, spoons and eager diners ready and waiting.

As there is no added sugar or preservatives, this sorbet is best eaten fresh.

Optimum9400-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-6881 Optimum9400-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-6887 Optimum9400-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-6889

Jungle Juice Sorbet

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
1-2 bananas, peeled, chopped and frozen
200-300 grams mixed fruits, peeled and chopped (if necessary) and frozen

Note: So that you can make smoothies and sorbets quickly whenever you feel like it, I recommend you keep chunks of frozen fruit ready to hand in your freezer. Banana is best frozen already peeled and chopped, likewise larger fruit such as pineapple and mango. Berries can simply be washed, hulled and frozen as they are. Make sure they’re fairly dry when you put them into the freezer, so the liquid doesn’t cause them to freeze into a solid block.

Method

  • Place your chosen fruit chunks straight from the freezer into your blender. (You’ll need a really robust blender to handle this. Alternatively, a high quality food processor will also work).
  • Blend until the fruit has been broken down into a thick, creamy puree. Pause once or twice to push solid chunks down closer to the blades if necessary.
  • Serve immediately.

This is my entry for July’s #BSFIC challenge – frozen treats inspired by Holiday Memories.

IceCreamChallenge mini

 

Kavey Eats received a review Optimum 9400 from Froothie and the link(s) above are affiliate links.

 

I’ve shared three Potato Dauphinoise posts on Kavey Eats over the years – the easy recipe I learned at the Waitrose cookery school, a caramelised onion version and a sweet potato and ham Dauphinoise. The original easy recipe also includes a variation substituting chicken stock for the milk, so I guess that’s actually four versions – yes I really do love potato Dauphinoise!

MandolinDauphinoise-1634

To celebrate the launch of Rosie Ramsden’s new book The Recipe Wheel her publishers have sent me one of the book’s recipe wheels to share. As you can see, it includes a number of Rosie’s potato gratin dishes – an exploration of how one can adapt a core dish extensively.

recipewheel MandolinDauphinoise-1629 SweetPotHamDauph-5162

 I thought it would be helpful for to share all my variation recipes in a single place:

Easy Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer the potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Easy Cream & Chicken Stock Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml chicken stock
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • As above, substituting the chicken stock for the milk.

 

Easy Caramelised Onion & Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
3-4 tablespoons sweet and sticky well-caramelised onions (I use ready made)

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer about a third of the potatoes into an oven dish, arranging them so they’re reasonably flat.
  • Spread the caramelised onions evenly across the potatoes.
  • Cover with the remaining slices of potatoes.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Sweet Potato & Ham Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
350 grams sweet potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
150-200 grams regular potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
100-150 grams thick sliced ham, cut into small pieces
Optional: handful of grated cheese

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato and sweet potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until they have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer some of the (mixed) potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat.
  • Scatter some of the ham pieces across them before adding another layer, and continue till all the potatoes and ham are in the oven dish. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • Serve hot.

 

Other recipes you may enjoy:

Creamy Potato, Bacon & Brie Tartiflette on Greedy Gourmet
‘Nduja Gratin on Fuss Free Flavours

 

Kavey Eats received a copy of The Recipe Wheel from Random House.

 

 

With summer finally arriving in full force, June’s #BSFIC theme was fruit.

As always, you shared a wonderful variety of ideas, all of which I wish I could try! (Sorry for the delay in sharing the round up; I was away in Dubrovnik at the end of the month and straight back to work on my return).

Check out July’s challenge here.

Strawberry and rosewater ice cream

Inspired by a cheesecake he made a few years ago, Michael of Me My Food & I turned something ordinary into something special by creating a Strawberry and Rosewater Ice Cream. He’s added a little grenadine and vanilla for extra complexity of flavour, too.

Sudha

Sudha, who writes Spicy, Quirky and Serendipitous, is a great improviser and pulled together her Vegan Coconut Milk Ice Cream with Strawberries after checking out a few coconut milk recipes that could be made without an ice cream machine.

ice-cream sandwich copy

Not only did Helen of Family, Friends, Food create a delicious ice cream but she made it into a sandwich too. Check out her Hazelnut Meringue 3 Berry Ice Cream Sandwich. I particularly love the pretty pink colour of her mixed berry ice cream.

fab ice lolly500px

Elizabeth of Elizabeth’s Kitchen diary has created a fabulous splash of colour by making Home Made Fab Ice Lollies. Inspired by a recipe in Aimee Ryan’s Coconut Milk Ice Cream book, these look way better than the shop-bought version!

It’s obvious that Laura knows How To Cook Food. Just look at her Raspberry Cranachan Ice Cream, taking a classic Scottish dessert and making an ice cream version. What a clever idea!

dsc_4040-001

Janet, over at The Taste Space, used coconut to create her Chocolate Mint Chip Ice Cream, a refreshing cooler from the humid summer heat in Houston. Several long hours of stirring the freezing mixture every half an hour didn’t produce the texture Janet hoped for so she recommends using an ice cream machine for this recipe.

bsfic paech melba bombe 2

I’m always excited to see what Foodycat Alicia comes up with and was as impressed as usual with her beautiful Peach Melba Bombe. She used a version of MiMi’s cream cheese ice cream base, plus raspberries macerated in Chambord, peach puree and two freezer-proof bowls!

FrozenYoghurt

Julia, who writes Something Missing, has tantalised my taste buds with herTarte au Citron Frozen Yoghurt, in which she adds chopped up pieces of actual lemon tart to her yoghurt and lemon curds base. I really like the idea of chunks of pastry and curd providing texture.

Redcurrant Ice-cream

Choclette, the writer behind the wonderful Chocolate Log Blog, created a very pretty Redcurrant Ripple Ice Cream. She’s balanced the redcurrants with sweet white chocolate and a little vanilla. I keep meaning to do a ripple ice cream, and this gorgeous ice cream inspires me to go for it.

Quick-Easy-Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-800text-6761

For my own entry, I created a creamy Quick & Easy Yuzu Ice Cream using Korean Yuzu Tea and a no churn base. Although this uses just three ingredients, Korean Yuzu Tea, condensed milk and double cream, it’s one of the tastiest ice creams I’ve made.

Banana and Almond Ice Cream

Not only was he the first to enter the challenge (once again), Michael made a second #BSFIC entry with this delicious Banana & Almond Ice Cream inspired by cinema ice cream!

photo

It’s no secret that I adore mangoes so I was always going to be a fan of these Yoghurt Mango Ice Lollies by Lisa from United Cakedom. They look so refreshing!

No-churn-dairy-free-raspberry-ice-cream-recipe-1-imp

Sarah from Maison Cupcake has discovered the joys of blending frozen fruit in a blender for an instant frozen treat, such as this No Churn Diary Free Vegan Raspberry Ice Cream. I’ve just taken delivery of a super powerful blender myself and have been planning a few frozen fruit sorbets and ice creams for the rest of summer too!

Ice-Cream-Terrine-348x450

Nazima, who writes the Franglais Kitchen blog, has created a very pretty Blueberry, Vanilla and Mascarpone Ice Cream Terrine in which she layers rich vanilla mascarpone with a centre of crunchy fruit and almond milk sherbet.

cherryalmond

Kate, the Gluten Free Alchemist, has achieved the most glorious rich purple colour in her Cherry-Almond Coconut Milk Ice Cream. She’s adapted a recipe from Aimee Ryan’s book, Coconut Milk Ice Cream, and it looks beautiful!

IceCreamChallenge

Please get your thinking caps on for July’s #BSFIC challenge, which has a theme of Holiday Memories.

 

It’s rare for us to make cakes the traditional way any more; creaming together butter and sugar, beating in the eggs and folding in the dry ingredients by hand is not only time-consuming but tiring on the arms too. Instead, for the last several years we’ve mixed most cake batters directly in our food processor, which has a permanent home on the kitchen work surface.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6090-text1000 Magimix 4200xl satin

The ingredients are tipped into the bowl, sometimes all together as in my favourite banana cake recipe, sometimes in two or three batches. The blade is very sharp so a few seconds blending is usually all it takes to bring everything together into a batter. Sometimes we need to remove the lid and scrape the sides down once, before a final quick pulse to finish.

The batter is then poured or spooned straight into the cake tin(s) and baked.

Easy peasy and very quick!

Challenged to create a few Brazilian recipes that make good use of my new Magimix 4200 XL, Pete and I made these tasty individual orange and lime cakes, more commonly made as a single larger cake. My previous post was an equally easy recipe for Brazilian Brigadeiro Chocolate Bonbons. For the basic cake batter recipe, we used a recipe by Marian Blazes, an American who has lived and travelled extensively in South America. As it was such a success for the Marzipan Cakes we made over Easter, we made individual cakes rather than one big one, and skipped the glaze altogether.

These are delightful little cakes with a refreshing and vibrant hit of citrus and, as Marian has found, very versatile – you could serve them for breakfast, elevenses, as a packed lunch treat or for afternoon tea.

Usually known as bolo de laranja, orange cake is apparently a popular cake in Brazil. I really like Marian’s combination of orange and lime, and wanted to reflect the use of two citrus fruits in the name. My friend Rosana helped me with translations.

 

Little Orange & Lime Cakes from Brazil | Bolinhos de Laranja e Limão

Makes 10 to 15 individual cakes, depending on size

Ingredients
2 oranges
1 lime
3 eggs (we used large eggs)
60 ml vegetable oil
125 grams butter, melted
300 grams plain white flour
100 grams ground almonds
350 grams sugar
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
0.5 teaspoon salt

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 180 °C (fan).
  • Liberally butter your muffin tins and then sprinkle a little flour over the buttered surfaces.
  • Zest the lime and the oranges.
  • Peel and section the orange, discarding the skin, pitch and membranes between segments. (You could candy the peel if you wish).
  • Juice the lime.
  • Place zest, orange flesh and lime juice into the food processor bowl and blend briefly until smooth.
  • Add the eggs, vegetable oil and melted butter to the processor and blend again until well mixed.
  • Add the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ground almonds to the processor and blend until the batter is smooth. Pause to scrape down the sides of the bowl and blend again briefly, if necessary.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle

  • Spoon or pour the batter into the prepared muffin tins.
  • Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, depending on the size of your muffin tins. The smaller cakes took 25 minutes, the larger ones needed another 5 minutes.
  • Test using a skewer (it should come out clean) or press the surface lightly (it should spring back).

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-4 Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-5

  • When nicely risen, golden brown on top and cooked through, remove from the oven and leave to cool for several minutes in the tins.

Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-10 Brazilian-Orange-Lime-Cakes-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6093

  • Remove from the tins and allow to cool fully on a wire rack.

Whatever time of day you choose to eat these bright little cakes, I hope you enjoy them!

Our new Magimix 4200 XL is very similar to our older 5200 – the key differences for us are the XL, which denotes the extra wide feed tube, and a slightly smaller footprint. The 4200 XL also comes with a BlenderMix attachment for smoothies and batters, which we’ve yet to try. Like the 5200, it comes with large, medium and mini bowls, a very sharp blade, an egg whisk attachment, a dough hook attachment and a couple of slicing and grating discs.

Other Brazilian recipes which make use of a food processor:

Pão o de Queijo (cheese bread) and Churrasco steak with salsa and rice
Cucumber Caipirinha Cocktail

Kavey Eats received a Magimix 4200 XL from Magimix.

 

Thus far, all the Brazilians I’ve met are warm, friendly, simple (by which I mean uncomplicated and genuine, not lacking in intelligence) and full of laughter.

Brigadeiro, a chocolate bon bon made with a few simple ingredients and decorated in a bold – perhaps even gaudy – style, is a wonderful representation of Brazil and its people – easy to make, looks and tastes fabulous and can’t fail to put a smile on your face.

Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6740

In a celebration of summer, Magimix are taking a look at Brazilian culture and cuisine and invited me to join in by sharing some Brazilian recipes on Kavey Eats.

We bought our first Magimix food processor a few years ago, and were enormously impressed with its multi-functionality. We used it a lot, more than we expected actually, by leaving it permanently out on the work surface. We fell a little out of love with it when the motor and blade malfunctioned (just months after the warranty expired) but were able to get it fixed and it’s been ok again ever since. The only downsides for us are the large footprint, given our limited work surface, and the small size of the feed tube on our 5200 model. The 4200 XL Magimix have just sent me has a (slightly) smaller footprint and a much larger feed tube. Every little helps!

Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6723 Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6724

For this recipe, I used the main blade in the largest bowl to finely chop some 85% dark chocolate – I find that the grating attachment doesn’t cope well with pieces of chocolate as these tend to fly off the side of the disc before they’ve been pushed through the grater. The main blade is super sharp and breaks down the solid chocolate quickly.

Brazilian Brigadeiro Chocolate Bonbons

Makes 15-20 bon bons

Ingredients
200 ml condensed milk
30-40 grams grated dark chocolate or good quality unsweetened cocoa
1 heaped teaspoon butter
extra butter or vegetable oil for greasing your hands
Granulated decorations such as chocolate granules, hundreds and thousands, coloured crystallised sugar or similar

Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6732 Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6741

Note: I used bronzed sugar crystals from the Waitrose Cooks’ range, hundreds and thousands and some extra grated chocolate.

Method

  • Combine condensed milk, grated chocolate and butter in a non-stick pan and heat gently, stirring continuously.

Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6726 Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6730

  • Once all the ingredients have melted and are well mixed, continue to cook until the mixture thickens considerably, stirring continuously. When the mixture is ready, pulling the spoon or spatula through it should cause it to pull away cleanly from the base of the pan, almost like a choux dough when it begins to ball up.
  • Remove from the heat and leave to cool until the mixture is cool enough to handle.
  • Spoon a few drops of vegetable oil or butter into your hands and rub both hands together to coat well.
  • Use a teaspoon to scoop a spoonful of the mixture, roll between your palms to form a ball and roll gently into your granulated decoration. (If you find the mixture too sticky to handle, even once cool, it hasn’t been cooked it for long enough – just return to the heat, cook a little more, then leave to cool and try again).
  • Once coated, place into individual bon bon paper cups or onto baking paper.
  • Serve immediately or store in the fridge until needed.

Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-text800-6738 Brazilian-Brigadeiro-Chocolate-Bonbons-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6753

 

Kavey Eats received a Magimix 4200XL food processor from Magimix.

 

Traditionally, the key ingredients in the Japanese dish shira-ae are white – white tofu, white miso and white sesame seeds; shiro means white in Japanese and the ae suffix denotes a vegetable dish with dressing. What’s unusual from my European perspective is the low amount of liquid ingredients in the dressing; the silken tofu provides both additional moisture and the body of the sauce.

This can be also used with other greens such as spinach or seaweed, or your own selection of vegetables.

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-text-1

Here’s the recipe. To learn more about the ingredients, keep reading.

Saya Ingen Shira-ae | Green Beans with a Tofu, Miso & Sesame Dressing

Serves 2-3 as a side dish

Ingredients
300 grams green beans (French beans)
100 grams silken tofu (pressed tofu is not suitable for this recipe)
50 grams lightly toasted white sesame seeds
2 teaspoons miso paste *
2 teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons mirin (rice wine)

* Shira-ae traditionally uses white miso paste, the mildest and sweetest miso. I prefer the saltier and more pungent flavour of red miso, so it’s the type I most commonly have in the fridge. Red miso gives my shira-ae dressing a darker colour than it would have if I used white miso.

Note: I have used Clearspring organic tofu, a long life firm silken tofu made with organic soy beans, spring water from Mount Fuji and nigari, a naturally occurring mineral rich coagulant derived from sea water. See below for my tofu lowdown.

Method

  • Prepare and cook the green beans as you like them. My preference is that they have a little crunch left in them.
  • Once cooked, drain and tip into a bowl of cold water to stop them cooking further.
  • In the meantime, grind the sesame seeds using a mortar and pestle, food processor or spice grinder.

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6

  • Mix the ground sesame seeds with the miso paste, sugar, mirin and tofu. Silken tofu is so soft and moist it will easily break up and combine with the other ingredients.

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6666

  • Drain the beans well and mix with the dressing.

Tofu, Miso and Sesame Seeds

Tofu

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-1 Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6650

Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk (itself made by soaking, grinding and heating soy beans and water) and straining the resulting curd. Originating in China about 2000 years ago, the technique spread to Korea and then Japan in the 8th century, coinciding with the spread of Buddhism – tofu is an important source of protein in a Buddhist vegetarian diet.

Incidentally, if you ever wondered about the English-language name, it’s taken directly from the Japanese, which is itself taken from the Chinese dòufu. Dòufu translates as “bean” “curdled”, giving us the name that is more prevalent in the United States – bean curd.

The variety of tofu available in East Asia is amazing!

Broadly speaking, tofu products divide into fresh and processed.

Fresh tofu comes in many different textures, the result of a range of different coagulants used to make it as well as differing production techniques.

Silken tofu is the softest kind and, because it’s not curdled, strained or pressed after coagulation, it has a really high moisture content. You can find both soft and firm silken tofu, but both are far softer and wetter than pressed tofu.

Firm tofu does retain a fair amount of moisture, but not as much as silken tofu. Its surface often retains the pattern of the muslin or mould used to strain and press it. The firmest tofu is pressed rigorously and has an almost rubbery texture, a little like paneer or halloumi.

There are also a number of processed tofu products included fermented, pickled and dried tofu. These include stinky tofu, which smells much like a very ripe soft European cheese. Just like cheese, it tastes far better than it smells!

Dried tofu is very light, does not need to be refrigerated and is usually rehydrated before use. There are many shapes and textures available.

Another type is frozen tofu. Large ice crystals, which form on freezing, leave cavities when the tofu is defrosted, creating a spongy texture. This type of tofu is often sold cubed and freeze dried.

Tofu can also be deep fried, usually after being cut into cubes or triangles, or into thinner pieces to create pouches for inari-zushi. Obviously, the firmer and drier types of tofu are better for frying.

These days, tofu is readily available in the UK, though you won’t find the sheer variety available in Asia!

It is often associated in the West with a vegetarian or vegan diet, with detractors dismissing it as bland and unappetising. Personally, I love the stuff. Yes, the flavour is subtle but it’s a very versatile ingredient. It’s also very healthy as it’s high in protein but relatively low in calories and fat. Depending on the coagulating agent used, it can also be high in calcium and magnesium.

Miso

Miso is made by fermenting soybeans, and sometimes additional grains such as rice or barley, with a fungus known in Japanese as kōjikin. The resulting paste is used as a seasoning throughout Japanese cooking. There are many, many different varieties available in Japan, often broadly divided by their colour. White is the mildest and sweetest. Red, aged for longer, is stronger and saltier and darkens with age through red into brown.

Sesame seeds

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-4 Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-6657

Sesame seed is oldest known oilseed crop, with archeological evidence suggesting it was already being cultivated 3500 years ago. Sesame seeds have a very high oil content and the oil itself is very stable with a long shelf life, making it easy to store in hot climates. Once the oil has been extracted from the seeds, the protein-rich remaining meal can be used as animal feed.

Most wild species are native to sub-Saharan Africa, where the genus originated, but the cultivated type, Sesame Indicum, originated in India. A hardy, drought-tolerant crop, sesame is now grown in tropical regions around the world with Burma, India and China the biggest producers (in 2010).

Of course, the seeds are popular in seed form too; they feature in many cuisines around the world, far too many dishes to list here.

Pale straw-coloured “white” seeds are the most common, but black varieties can be very striking, especially when combined with the white. I loved the jin doy spheres I enjoyed at A Wong a few months ago.

I love this tidbit from Wiki’s page on sesame seeds: “Upon ripening, sesame fruit capsules split, releasing the seeds with a pop. It has been suggested that this is root of the phrase “Open Sesame” in the historic fable of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves in One Thousand and One Nights. The opening of the capsule releases the treasure of sesame seeds.”

Suribachi & Surikogi

One of my favourite purchases from our last visit to Japan was a beautiful suribachi (grinding bowl) and surikogi (wooden grinder). This very Japanese mortar and pestle is perfect for grinding sesame seeds, which are quickly pulverised against the ridged inner surface of the bowl.

Did you know that Iwo Jima’s Mount Suribachi was named for this humble kitchen tool?

Green-Bean-Shiraae-KaveyEats-KFavelle-3

 

This dish is such a quick and easy one to make and is both healthy and utterly delicious. I hope you enjoy it and do please leave me a comment to let me know what you think!

Kavey Eats received product samples courtesy of Clearspring.

Jun 232014
 

Yuzu makes a fabulous sorbet, one I am seldom able to resist if I see it on a menu.

But when I was given a jar of Korean Yuzu Tea to try by Sous Chef I decided to use it in a simple yuzu ice cream instead.

Yuzu is an Asian citrus that originated in China (though be aware that in China, yòuzi refers to pomelo) but it’s particularly popular in Korea and Japan. The tart flavour is reminiscent of mandarin, grapefruit and lime and has a delightfully floral note to it.

The Japanese make extensive use of the fruit – yuzu juice is an integral ingredient in ponzu, a classic dipping sauce; yuzu koshu is a fiery condiment made from yuzu zest, chilli and salt; and the citrus is also a popular flavouring for both sweet and savoury dishes. The aromatic oils in the skins are so fragrant that the Japanese have even invented the yuzu buro (yuzu bath) – whole or halved fruit floating in a steaming hot bath; this is on my list for my next Japan visit!

In Korea a hot drink known as yuzacha (yuzu tea) is a popular cold remedy. This is actually a marmalade-like preserve, made by cooking the fruit and rind of the fruit in sugar and honey – a generous spoonful of which is stirred into hot water to make the “tea”.

Indeed, I’d happily have Sous Chef’s Korean Yuzu Tea on toast or stirred into natural yoghurt for breakfast!

Quick-Easy-Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-800text-6761

To keep things quick and simple on a busy weekend, I used my go-to no-churn ice cream base – double cream and condensed milk – and stirred in lots of Korean Yuzu Tea once the base was whipped.

This turned out to be one of the most delicious ice creams I’ve made! Taste, texture and even the bursts of colour from the peel – everything was spot on. I don’t think the tub will last long!

Quick & Easy Yuzu Ice Cream

Ingredients
300 ml double cream
150 ml condensed milk
5-6 tablespoons Korean yuzacha 

Note: You can adapt this recipe to make many different flavours of ice cream – just substitute your favourite fruit jam, jelly or marmalade.

Method

  • Whisk the cream until it is thick but still a little floppy.

HoneycombIceCream-0973

  • Add the condensed milk and whisk again until it holds its shape.

Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-093849

  • Gently stir in the yuzacha or your chosen fruit jam.

Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-094205

  • Transfer into a freezer container and freeze overnight.

Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-093210 Yuzu-Ice-Cream-KaveyEats-KFavelle-093349

 

This is my entry for the June #BSFIC challenge.

IceCreamChallenge mini

 As I won’t be available to post the round up this weekend, I’m extending the deadline for entries to June 30th, emails to be received by 1st July.

Kavey Eats received a sample of Korean Yuzu Tea from souschef.co.uk.

 

White cherries aren’t really white; they’re gorgeous pale yellow blushed with rose.

White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-122806 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-124707 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-135800

Fortunately for me, the small fruit stall just outside the office where I currently work has had them on sale recently and I’ve purchased so many the stall holder probably assumes I’m a weird cherry addict. When I told him this bag were destined for cherry rum liqueur, he asked me to bring him a taste of the finished hooch!

I’ve been sharing images of these beauties online and friends have asked if they’re rainier cherries, a variety developed in Washington (and named for Mount Rainier) in 1952. All the stall holder could tell me is that they were grown in Spain, so I’m not sure whether they’re rainier cherries or not.

Regardless of variety, they’re utterly delicious and I felt inspired by twitter friend @ShochuLounge to preserve some in alcohol. Their tip about leaving the pips in to infuse almond flavour notes was an extra push as stoning cherries is a thankless task.

The strawberry vodka liqueur I made a few years ago turned out wonderfully well and since then I’ve made a few more random fruit liqueurs simply by combining my chosen fruit with lots of sugar and whatever clear spirit I have to hand – I tend to amass bottles of spirit that languish in the drinks cupboard for years, so am determined to make something interesting with as many of them as possible.

White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-191545 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-191614 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-191727
White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-191844 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-191951 White-Cherry-Rum-Liqueur-KaveyEats-KFavelle-192119-800px

Home Made White Cherry Rum Liqueur

Ingredients
300 grams white cherries
200 grams sugar
500 ml white rum

Note: You can switch the fruit for whatever is seasonal and the spirit for whatever you have to hand. A clear spirit is best, with a flavour that marries well with your chosen fruit. Adjust the ratios of fruit, sugar and alcohol to suit your tastes. I have a sweet tooth so am aiming for my liqueur to be rich and sweet.

Method

  • Wash the cherries and remove the stems. Use a sharp knife to cut into the cherries and slice at least half way around, without cutting them in half. This makes it easier for the sugar and alcohol to take on the flavours of the skin, flesh and pips.
  • Place cherries, sugar and rum into a clean airtight glass jar and seal.
  • For the first few weeks, shake and turn regularly, to help the sugar dissolve and the flavours to mix.
  • Leave to mature for at least 3-4 months; the longer the better.
  • Strain through muslin for a clearer finished result, before bottling your finished liqueur.
  • Enjoy the alcohol-soaked fruit as a bonus dessert – lovely with double cream or vanilla ice cream.

I’ll update this post with a photo of the finished cherry rum liqueur in a few months but I’m confident it will be another really delicious home made tipple!

 

ssbadge300 no-waste-food-badge FSF

I’m entering this into Ren Behan’s Simple & In Season Challenge, the No Waste Food Challenge (hosted this month by Utterly Scrummy Michelle) and the Four Seasons Food Challenge (hosted this month by The Spicy Pear).

 

An affordable recipe perfect for alfresco dining, making use of British ingredients.

That’s what I was asked to create when vouchercodes.co.uk invited me to film another recipe video with them. (For my first, I shared the recipe for my mum’s tandoori roast lamb, an alternative suggestion for Christmas dinner.)

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-4

This time, I made a frittata, opting for a combination of chorizo, spinach, onion & potato.

I’m calling this a frittata but it’s probably more accurate to say it’s a combination of an Italian frittata and tortilla Espanola. From the Spanish tortilla I’ve taken the combination of eggs, potatoes and onions and from the Italian frittata, the addition of meats, cheeses and vegetables.

The dish is very versatile – it can be served hot, warm or cold, works for brunch, lunch or dinner, stores well in the fridge and is easy to transport. That makes it perfect for picnics or alfresco dining in the back garden.

It’s wonderfully easy to adapt this recipe by switching out the chorizo and spinach. In place of chorizo, try cubed pancetta or bacon, or for a vegetarian option, goat’s cheese is fabulous stirred in or scattered over the top just before grilling. Instead of spinach, use peas (I use frozen petit pois) or long stem broccoli, parboiled ahead of being added to the pan.

You might also take inspiration from kookoo, a Persian version in which eggs are loaded with lots and lots of chopped mixed fresh green herbs. Mint, basil, dill, parsley – all would work well here.

Chorizo, Spinach, Onion & Potato Frittata Recipe

Serves 4 as a main or 6-8 as part of a wider selection

Ingredients
3-4 tablespoons vegetable oil
100 grams British cooking chorizo, diced (0.5 cm)
400 grams white onions, thinly sliced
350 grams large floury potatoes, peeled and diced (1 cm)
100 grams baby spinach leaves, washed
6 large free range eggs, beaten, with salt and pepper

Method

  • Add 3 tablespoons of oil to the pan.
  • Cook the diced chorizo in the oil for 4-5 minutes over a medium heat.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-5

  • Remove the chorizo with a slatted spoon, leaving the coloured oil in the pan.
  • Add the sliced onions, stir to coat in the oil and spread evenly across the pan. Cover and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-1

  • Add the diced potato, stir to mix into the onions and oil. Cover and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. If the pan looks dry at any point, add a few teaspoons of water. The potatoes should be cooked through.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-4

  • Uncover the pan and turn up the heat a little. Fry for a couple of minutes, to give the potatoes a touch of colour.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-2

  • Add the spinach leaves and stir until wilted – this doesn’t take long.
  • Make sure the ingredients are evenly distributed, drizzle a another teaspoon or two of oil around the outside edges of the pan and then pour in the eggs.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-3

  • Preheat the grill on a medium setting.
  • Cook the frittata for about 5 minutes, drawing the edges in a little until the base sets.
  • To check whether it’s set, use a spatula to lift up the edges and shake the pan to check whether the frittata will come loose.
  • Transfer the pan to the grill and cook for 2-3 minutes, to cook and colour the top of the frittata.
  • Place a large plate over the pan and turn over plate and pan together, to remove the frittata from the pan.
  • Use a second plate to turn the frittata right side up, if you prefer.
  • Serve in slices, hot, warm or cold.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-1 Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-2

Thanks to vouchercodes.co.uk for inviting me to create this recipe video, and Tall Order Films for doing such a great job of filming and editing. Kavey Eats received a fee for creating this content.

© 2006 - 2014 Kavita Favelle Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha