The last couple of weeks have been a scorcher and I’ve been turning to home made ice lollies (popsicles) to cool down. My mango lassi ice lollies made with fresh mango and natural yoghurt were superbly refreshing and so too are my latest batch – combining fresh nectarines, maple syrup and bourbon in mini ice pops for grown ups.

These will work equally well with peaches or nectarines or you could even use apricots if you have some to hand.

Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (Portrait Text Over)

As I’ve used the darkest grade of Canadian maple syrup which is much stronger in flavour than light, medium and amber grades, I used half sugar and half maple syrup in my mixture to keep the maple flavour from overwhelming. However if you are using medium or amber syrup, you can use 100% maple syrup as your sweetener if you prefer.

Nectarine, Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops

Makes approximately 12 mini ice pops depending on the capacity of your moulds, or you can make a small number of regular sized ice lollies instead.

Ingredients
300 grams nectarine flesh, skin on (about 3 nectarines)
4 tablespoons dark maple syrup
4 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons bourbon

Note: You can substitute peaches or apricots for nectarines in this recipe, if you like.
Note: If your fruit is very sweet and ripe, you can reduce the volume of maple syrup and sugar a little.
Note: As I used a power blender to blitz my mixture, I left the nectarine skins on as my blender purees them very well. You can peel the fruit if you prefer.
Note: I used half and half dark grade maple syrup and regular sugar. If using medium or amber maple syrup, you can replace the sugar with another 4 tablespoons of maple syrup if you prefer.

You will also need ice cube moulds (or regular ice lolly moulds) and lolly sticks. Because of the alcohol and maple syrup, this recipe remains a little sticky once frozen, so make sure you use flexible plastic or silicon moulds to allow for easy removal of the finished pops.

Method

  • In a blender, blitz the nectarine flesh until smooth.
  • Add three quarters of the maple syrup / sugar and blend again.  Taste before deciding whether or not to add more. As freezing changes the way we taste sweetness, the mixture should be a little oversweet to your taste at this stage.
  • Add bourbon and blend again.
  • Pour into your ice cube mould or into regular ice lolly moulds if you prefer.
  • Insert a lolly stick into each one.
  • Freeze upright for 24 hours.
  • Once frozen, unmould individual ice pops by stretching and flexing the mould and gently teasing out the ice pop.
  • Eat straight away, returning the rest to the freezer immediately if not serving.

Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-154519 Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-154549
Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)- Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-155241 Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-155243

I used my Froothie Optimum power blender to blend my nectarines into a super smooth smooth pulp, much as I use it to make smoothies. The powerful motor can also blend solid frozen fruit straight from the freezer to make an instant sorbet. I’ve also made several delicious soups in it as well as custard-based ice creams – it’s a great no-fuss way to make custard from scratch and fruit curds are also a doddle.

Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-8813 Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (c)-8818
Nectarine Maple & Bourbon Mini Ice Pops on Kavey Eats (Landscape Text Over)

This is my entry into this month’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream, which has a theme of dairy free. All bloggers are welcome to join in, please check the challenge post for information. This is also my post for Munchies & Munchkins’ Al Fresco challenge.

IceCreamChallenge mini

Nectarine Maple Bourbon Mini Ice Pops (Pinterest Tall Pin)

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PARTNEREDPOSTFor me, mayonnaise is indelibly associated with the summer; an integral part of food eaten outside. The picnic rugs and garden tables of my childhood were laden with bacon and mayo-dressed potato-salad, rich and creamy coleslaws, a huge bowl of tuna-sweetcorn-mayo and a bottle of homemade Marie Rose sauce to slather over burgers and sausages charred from the barbeque. And that remains the same today.

To celebrate the launch of their new [Seriously] Good Mayonnaise, Heinz have set a challenge to create a recipe including the new mayonnaise as a key ingredient; the recipe is to be presented on a spoon, a single mouthful packed with flavour. Given that canapés are often made in large numbers, I favour ideas that deliver hugely on taste but are quick and easy to make and don’t need a long list of ingredients. These Nori-Wrapped Hot Smoked Salmon Cubes with Miso Mayonnaise are my entry into the Heinz [Seriously] Good Spoonfuls Competition – simple, delicious four-ingredient spoonfuls based on my favourite Japanese flavours.

Nori-Wrapped Hot Smoked Salmon Cubes With Miso Mayonnaise on Kavey Eats (Titled2)

At the heart of these canapés is hot smoked salmon. You might be wondering what the difference is between regular smoked salmon, hot smoked salmon and gravlax? For the first, raw salmon is smoked without heat which cures the fish without cooking, resulting in a silky slippery texture that is best suited to serving in thin slices. For the second, the fish is either hung or laid out in racks within hot smoke, creating the wonderful flaky texture of cooked fish plus all that delicious flavour from the smoke. Gravlax and lox are both made by curing salmon without any smoke at all, applying combinations of salt, sugar, herbs and spices to draw out the moisture and preserve the fish – the texture is much like smoked salmon but the flavour is quite different.

Nori-Wrapped Hot Smoked Salmon Cubes With Miso Mayonnaise on Kavey Eats (c)-8793

Miso paste is a fabulously versatile ingredient and great for adding a savoury note to all manner of dishes. Made by fermenting soybeans with a fungus known in Japanese as kōjikin, the pungent, salty and umami-rich paste is used as a seasoning throughout Japanese cooking. There are many different varieties available in Japan, usually broadly divided by their colour. White is the mildest and sweetest. Red, aged for longer, is stronger and saltier. As it is aged miso paste darkens through red into brown. Some varieties have grains such as rice or barley added to the soybeans.

Nori is the Japanese name for edible Pyropia seaweed and usually refers to thin dried sheets that are made by shredding, pressing and drying fresh seaweed. These are most commonly used in sushi – particularly for maki rolls and gunkan maki and for tying toppings to nigiri sushi – but are also a popular garnish for all manner of dishes including rice and ramen.

Nori-Wrapped Hot Smoked Salmon Cubes With Miso Mayonnaise

Makes 12 one-bite canapés

Ingredients
Approx. 250 grams hot smoked salmon fillet (see note)
100 grams Heinz [Seriously} Good Mayonnaise
1-2 tablespoons miso paste, to taste (see note)
1 sheet nori (Japanese dried seaweed)

Note: Hot smoked salmon is also known as kiln-roasted salmon. Look for pieces cut across the fillet – this will make it easier to cut evenly sized cubes.
Note: I used white miso paste for my Miso Mayo, as I had a tub open in the fridge, but you can use whichever you prefer. The saltiness and intensity of flavour vary hugely between different types and brands, so add a little and then taste before adding more.

Method

  • Carefully cut the hot smoked salmon fillets into evenly sized cubes. Depending on the shape and size of your fillets, you may get a few more than 12. The salmon is delicate and will flake easily, so be gentle!
  • Weigh the mayonnaise into a bowl and add one tablespoon of miso paste. Mix thoroughly and taste before adding more if necessary.
  • Carefully cut the nori sheet into thin strips.
  • Carefully wrap a strip of nori around each cube of salmon, letting the two ends overlap underneath. They should stick easily to the oily fish and remain in place.
  • Spoon a small dollop of miso mayonnaise on top of each piece and serve.

 Nori-Wrapped Hot Smoked Salmon Cubes With Miso Mayonnaise on Kavey Eats (Titled1)

Other delicious Heinz [Seriously] Good Spoonfuls canapé ideas from some of my friends:

Kavey Eats was compensated by Heinz Foods UK for the development and publication of this recipe.

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Popularised by Heston Blumenthal, triple-cooked chips (french fries for you North Americans) are very simple to make at home and not at all as faffy as they sound.

The first cooking is to parboil the chipped potatoes; the next is to fry the chips at a low-to-medium temperature and allow them to cool and dry; the third is to fry again at a higher temperature to finish. One of the handy aspects of this recipe is that it allows you to do the prep and first two stages of cooking in advance, so that you are left only with a quick hot fry to finish just before serving.

Says Heston, ‘The first secret is cooking the chips until they are almost falling apart as the cracks are what makes them so crispy. The second secret is allowing the chips to steam dry then sit in the freezer for an hour to get rid of as much moisture as possible. The final secret is to cook the chips in very hot oil for a crispy, glass-like crust.

Even without putting them in the freezer, following Heston’s method will result in very delicious chips indeed.

Heston Blumenthals Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats

Rather appropriately, we made our triple-cooked chips in the Smart Fryer designed by Heston Blumenthal for Sage Appliances. This is a fantastic step up from our last deep fat fryer which served us well for the last three years but is now falling apart, particularly the basket and the hinge of the lid. That was our first deep fat fryer and it was a great improvement over using a deep casserole dish on our gas hob. But it was heavy and unwieldy making it hard to empty the oil out of and a pain to clean.

Our new Sage Smart Fryer has an ingenious design – the entire fryer separates into five components: a heating element and control panel unit, the exterior shell of the fryer, a removable inner well, the frying basket and the lid. With the exception of the element and control panel unit, all the other components are dishwasher safe, which is very handy for cleaning. Being able to remove the inner well of the fryer also makes it so much easier to pour out the 4 litres of oil that the fryer holds. Other helpful design aspects include a double-walled exterior shell for insulation, a viewing window in the lid and a foldable handle on the fryer basket so it can be stored inside the basket when not in use.

In terms of cooking, you can set temperature and time manually in Custom mode or use one of the six preset Cook modes. These are Twice Fried Chips (that’s triple cooked chips in other words – the first cooking being the parboiling), Fish, Nuggets, Calamari, Doughnuts or (single fry) Chips. Choosing any of these Cook modes will display the preset time and temperature, which you can manually adjust if you wish. Once you’ve pressed the Start / Cancel button, just wait for the Heating message to disappear, then indicate whether you’re putting in Fresh or Frozen food, press the Timer button and lower the basket of food into the oil. When it’s finished, the fryer will beep. At this point you can either press the Timer and cook for an additional period, or press Start / Cancel to turn off the heating element. The Twice Fried Chips setting has an additional choice to make – whether you’re on the 1st Fry or the 2nd Fry. The Scroll / Select knob allows you to indicate this.

If you do not have a deep fat fryer you can fry the chips in a heavy-based casserole dish or pan on your hob, however you will need a thermometer to check the temperature of the oil.

sage the smart fryer 3 sage the smart fryer 1
images provided by Sage

Heston’s Triple Cooked Chips

Recipe method by Kavey Eats

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
1 kg floury potatoes, peeled and cut into chips
groundnut or grapeseed oil to fry
Salt, to serve

Note: Heston recommends traditional floury varieties such as Maris Piper, Desiree or King Edward and suggests cutting the chips chunky – 2 cm x 2 cm thick – but smaller is also fine.
Note: Keep the peeled potatoes in a bowl of cold water as you work, and likewise with the chips as you cut them. This will stop browning on exposure to the air.
Note: The v
olume of oil needed depends on the capacity of your deep fat fryer. Mine is 4 litres.

Method

  • Place the chips into a large saucepan of cold water (making sure they are covered with water) and cook over a medium heat. Simmer until the chips are soft all the way through.
    [Pete’s technique is to bring the pan of cold water and chips to a boil, then turn off the heat and leave to soak for five minutes.]
  • Drain the chips and carefully spread them out on a cooling rack or baking tray to dry out. You can also place them into the freezer for an hour to remove more moisture, if you have space and time.

Heston Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats-181215 Heston Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats-181953

  • Heat the oil in your deep-fat fryer to 130 °C. Once it reaches temperature, fry the chips (in batches if need be) until they take on a pale yellow colouring. This takes at least 5 minutes.
  • Remove from the oil, drain and spread out to cool before the second frying. At this stage, if you don’t want to cook and serve the chips straight away you can refrigerate them for up to 3 days, if you wish.

Heston Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats-182528 Heston Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats-185401

  • Now heat your oil to 180 °C. Once it reaches temperature, fry the chips until golden brown, around 5-7 minutes.
  • Drain, sprinkle with salt and serve immediately.

Note: If you are using the Smart Fryer’s Twice Fried setting, note that the recipe provided doesn’t include the parboiling stage, and therefore frying times are a little longer to cook the chips through to the centre. You can still use this mode to make Triple Cooked Chips but adjust the timer down by a couple of minutes for each fry.

Heston Triple Cooked Chips on Kavey Eats-185815

Kavey Eats received a Sage by Heston Blumenthal Smart Fryer for review. As always, I was not obliged to write a positive review; all opinions are my own and I recommend only products I truly believe in. This post contains affiliate links; please see my sidebar for further information.

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From its name you might think it’s a type of tomato. It certainly looks a lot like one, once its husk is peeled away.

In fact, although the tomatillo is a member of the expansive nightshade family (which includes tomatoes as well as potatoes, aubergines, chillis and peppers), it actually falls within the physalis genus, making it more closely related to the cape gooseberry.

Like the cape gooseberry, the tomatillo is a smooth-skinned round fruit enveloped in a delicate, paper-thin, lantern-shaped husk. Green and pliant on the plant, once picked the husk starts to dry out, turning brown and brittle; the greener the husk, the more freshly picked the tomatillo.

Both cape gooseberries and tomatillos hark originally from Central and South America and, indeed, tomatillos are a staple ingredient in Mexican cuisine. They are eaten fried, grilled or boiled in many different preparations and are a core ingredient of salsa verde.

Ripe tomatillo fruits can range from yellow to red and purple but green is the most common colour, making them look even more like unripe tomatoes.

IMG_5169 - Homegrown Tomatillos on Kavey Eats - 1

The similarity of their names is no coincidence; both words come from Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs, with tomatillos originally being known as tomātl (fat water) and tomatoes as xitomatl (fat water with navel). When the Spaniards exported the tomato to the rest of the world, they took with them the name tomate.

But unlike the tomato, the tomatillo has not yet become a common global ingredient. Although imported Mexican fresh tomatillos are sometimes available in Europe, it has often been easier to find the fruit in tinned form.

However, in recent years, specialist farmers have started to grow tomatillos here in the UK. Edible Ornamentals, a chilli specialist in Bedfordshire, is the largest tomatillo grower in the UK and sells the fruit commercially. Owners Shawn and Joanna Plumb once lived in San Antonio, Texas, where they became very familiar with tomatillos along with many varieties of chilli. Mexican cooking is very popular in Texas.

Joanna is an enormous fan of tomatillos, explaining that “the flavour is like nothing I have ever tasted. It is a cross between a tomato, a cucumber and a water melon. Very refreshing.” Although she loves eating the fruits straight off the plant, she also enjoys them in a traditional green salsa.

Of course, one sure-fireway of getting your hands on fresh tomatillos is to grow them yourself. “Tomatillos grow like triffids,” warns Joanna, and recommends training them up a vertical support so they don’t take over your garden. You will need at least two plants as they pollinate each other.

Keen gardeners can buy tomatillo plants directly from Edible Ornamentals’ nursery in Chawston, Bedfordshire and visiting the farm also offers the opportunity of a chilli tour and Pick Your Own. You can also grow from seed – available from a number of seed catalogue companies. Tomatillos usually start fruiting in July or August and, if you grow them in a greenhouse or polytunnel, continue until the frost comes along.

If you are able to find fresh tomatillos, the good news is that they last for a couple of weeks in the fridge; up to twice that if the husks are removed. They can also be frozen, whole or chopped. And, of course, you can cook them and preserve in jars. It’s worth noting that tomatillos have a high pectin content, making them a great ingredient to add to jams and chutneys.

IMG_5185 - Homegrown Tomatillos on Kavey Eats - 2 IMG_1798 - Homegrown Tomatillos on Kavey Eats - 1
Homegrown tomatillos, fresh tomatillos in the kitchen of a London-based Mexican restaurant chain

Tomatillo Salsa Recipe

by Joanna Plumb of Edible Ornamentals

Ingredients
10 tomatillos with husk removed, finely diced
Half a finely chopped onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 serrano chile pepper, minced
2 tablespoons chopped coriander
1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
0.5 teaspoon ground cumin
0.5 teaspoon salt, or to taste

Method

  • Place tomatillos, onion, garlic, and Serrano chilli into a bowl.
  • Season with coriander, oregano, cumin and salt.
  • Leave for about 30 minutes and then serve.
  • Can be used as a side dish, in fajitas or as a dip for tortilla chips.

You may also be interested in Joanna’s chilli growing tips, which she shared with us during our visit.

Tomatillo Salsa and an introduction to tomatillos

This piece was written in 2014 and first published in Good Things magazine. ©Kavita Favelle.

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A few days ago I shared my review of Everyday Harumi by Harumi Kurihara. Kurihara is one of Japan’s most well known cookery book writers and TV cookery show presenters and also runs a chain of home ware shops and cafes, and publishes a quarterly recipe magazine. To write Everyday Harumi, she spent time living, shopping and cooking in England all the better to ensure that the recipes were achievable for British cooks.

We have made her delicious green beans with minced pork a few times and love the balance of flavours and textures. It’s quick and simple to cook and a small amount of meat goes a long way, so it’s perfect if you’re trying to reduce the amount of meat you eat.

Don’t forget, you can win a copy of the new paperback edition of Everyday Harumi in my latest giveaway.

greenbeans/mincepork

Green Beans with Minced Pork

This dish is something of a tradition in my household. It is easy to prepare, only needing soy sauce for seasoning, and makes use of wonderful ingredients like ginger, garlic and Japanese leeks. It is a great dish that can be rustled up quickly if guests drop in unexpectedly. I usually serve it with white rice and if there are any leftovers, they don’t last long in our house.

Serves 4

Ingredients
500 g green beans
40 g leek
15 g fresh ginger, peeled
8 g garlic
Sunflower or vegetable oil – for frying
200 g minced pork
30–45 ml soy sauce
sliced fresh or dried red chillies – to taste
sesame oil – to taste

Method

  • Prepare the green beans, lightly cook in boiling water, then rinse under cold running water.
  • Drain the beans, pat-dry and cut diagonally into easy-to-eat pieces.
  • Finely chop the leek, ginger and garlic.
  • Put a little oil in a frying pan over a high heat. Add the chopped leek, ginger and garlic, allowing the flavours to infuse in the oil, then add the minced pork and stir-fry.
  • Add the green beans, then add soy sauce and red chilli to taste.
  • Continue to cook until the beans have heated through. Add a little sesame oil to taste and serve with hot white rice.

Recipe extracted from Everyday Harumi with permission from Conran Octopus.

Everyday Harumi by Harumi Kurihara is published by Conran Octopus. The hardback edition is currently available on Amazon for £16.59 (RRP £20). The newly published paperback version is available on Amazon for £13.48 (RRP £14.99).

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Jul 032016
 

Also known as a fruit crisp in parts of North America a fruit crumble is one of Britain’s favourite desserts; a comforting bowl of cooked fruit topped with a layer of flour, sugar and fat crumbled together and baked in a hot oven.

It’s popularity grew enormously in the era of rationing during and after World War II, when a thin layer of crumble was an economic alternative to the volume of pastry needed to make a pie. Foraged and home grown fruit made it even more so.

A crumble is also wonderfully easy to make, especially versions where the fruit filling doesn’t need to be cooked ahead of assembly.

The most popular fruit for crumble is apple, often combined with blackberries or rhubarb, though I’ve also enjoyed crumbles made with peaches, plums or gooseberries. Cherry crumbles are less common, perhaps because the fruit is one that remains quite expensive here, even when its in season.

Recently I bought a bag of ‘sweet cherries’ at a local market that were anything but – far too sharp but with a lovely flavour beneath the acidity.

Although I do love the basic flour, sugar and butter crumble mix, I have come to prefer this version with rolled oats added to the mix. The combination of oats and flour makes for a topping that remains crisp and crumbly on top, but still provides that magical layer of gooey stodginess, where the crumble has sucked up some of the moisture from the fruit below.

20160606_140101 - Sweet Cherry Crumble Recipe on Kavey Eats - 1 Sweet Cherry Crumble Crisp Recipe on Kavey Eats

I’m calling this a ‘crumble crisp’ because I love both the British and North American names for this dish, and combining them makes me smile.

Sweet Cherry Crumble Crisp

Serves 4-5

Ingredients
Filling

400-450 grams pitted cherries, halved
Optional: 25 grams Demerara sugar
Optional: 1 tablespoon cherry brandy or other cherry liqueur
Topping
100 grams plain flour
75 grams butter
100 grams Demerara sugar
50 grams rolled oats

Note: As I don’t have a cherry pitter, I halved each cherry and used the tip of the paring knife to help slip out the pip. Since the cherries sit more snugly together when halved, I recommend halving them even if you have a proper pitter.

Equipment: Our casserole dish has a 7 inch (18 cm) diameter, which results in a decent depth of fruit beneath a generous layer of topping. Using a larger dish will result in thinner layers and may require an adjustment to the cooking times. However, you can double the quantities and use a 10 inch (25 cm) diameter dish to make a larger crumble, if you prefer.

Method

  • If the cherries are a little sharp, sprinkle with 25 grams of Demerara sugar, cover with cling film and set aside for an hour.
  • If you plan to bake the crumble as soon as it’s assembled, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Alternatively, you can prepare the crumble a few hours in advance, set aside, and bake in a preheated oven when required.
  • To create the crumble crisp topping, blend the flour and butter in a food processor for a few seconds until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Using the pulse function helps to distribute the butter evenly and ensure that the entire mixture is crumbled. If you don’t have a food processor or prefer to do this by hand make sure the butter is cold, cut it into small cubes and then rub the flour and butter together with your fingertips until the entire mixture looks like breadcrumbs.
  • Add the Demerara sugar and rolled oats to the flour and butter mixture and stir with a spoon or spatula. Be gentle enough not to compress the topping, but ensure that the oats and sugar are well mixed in.
  • If you are adding cherry brandy or liqueur to the cherries, pour the alcohol over the cherries, stir well and then transfer cherries to your baking dish (see above), making sure to include all the juices and liquid in the bowl.

20160606_180327 - Sweet Cherry Crumble Recipe on Kavey Eats - 2 20160606_180358 - Sweet Cherry Crumble Recipe on Kavey Eats - 3

  • Spread the crumble crisp topping evenly over the cherry filling. Don’t pat it down, the intention is for it to retain an aerated crumbly texture.
  • Bake in a preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, until the topping has taken on a golden colour.
  • Serve hot with custard, cream or vanilla ice cream.

20160606_191356 - Sweet Cherry Crumble Recipe on Kavey Eats - 5

What’s your favourite recipe for fresh cherries? Have you used them in a crumble or do you prefer a more traditional apple filling? And what do you think of adding oats into the topping? Let me know in the comments; I love hearing from you!

Other ideas for fresh, canned and dried cherries:

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A few days ago I shared my review of Regula Ysewjin’s Pride and Pudding: The History of British Puddings published by Murdoch Books. Click through to read more about this absolutely beautiful and fascinating book that shares a slice of Britain’s culinary history through the stories of its puddings and do enter my giveaway to win your own copy here.

Today I’m happy to share a recipe from the book, a historic Bakewell Pudding. I’ve also provided Regula’s puff pastry recipe, which is used in the pudding.

bakewell-pudding-regula-ysewijn-5943-postcard-shop

Regula Ysewjin’s Traditional Bakewell Pudding

Extracted with permission from Pride and Pudding: The History of British Puddings by Regula Ysewijn

All of the 1830s recipes for Bakewell pudding are quite different in character, which makes it hard to define the ‘real’ Bakewell pudding. There are also very strong similarities with a Sweet-meat Pudding from Eliza Smith’s book The Compleat Housewife (1737). Some Bakewell puddings have a layer of jam, others have a layer of candied peel and preserves as in the sweet-meat pudding. Some use bitter almonds, others do not. It leads me to believe that the Bakewell pudding wasn’t a pudding invented in an inn in Bakewell, as the popular myth likes people to believe; it was an existing pudding that was renamed thus to attract customers in the nineteenth century. And because it became famous in that locality, it disappeared in the rest of the country, making it a regional dish.

The version with just a layer of jam is the one that the Bakewell bakeries adopted as the true recipe. But if you would like to taste the earlier sweet-meat pudding version, here it is. I use powdered raw sugar, as early recipes often ask for loaf sugar, powdered, and it works better indeed. If you have a heatproof plate that will go into your oven, use that instead of a pie dish, as I believe this was the original vessel used to bake this pudding.

Makes 2 puddings in 23 cm (9 inch) shallow plates

Ingredients
25 g (1 oz) bitter apricot kernels
1 teaspoon rosewater
110 g (3¾ oz) clarified butter, melted
110 g (3¾ oz) raw sugar, powdered in a food processor
5 egg yolks
1 egg white
1 quantity puff pastry (see below)
2 tablespoons raspberry jam
50 g (1¾ oz) candied lemon peel, cut into strips

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).
  • Blanch and skin the apricot kernels by pouring boiling water over them to make the skins come off. Rinse under cold water and dry them using a clean tea towel (dish towel) to rub off the last of the skins.
  • Using a mortar and pestle, pound up the blanched apricot kernels with the rosewater. This will prevent the apricot kernels from producing oil and also will add a heavenly scent. Transfer to a bowl and whisk in the clarified butter and the sugar, whisking until creamy. Add the eggs and whisk to combine. Don’t be alarmed if the filling seems runny to you, it is normal.
  • Line a pie dish or plate with the puff pastry rolled out as thin as you can manage and spread the raspberry jam over it, leaving a 2 cm (¾ inch) border that will become the rim. Neatly arrange strips of candied lemon peel over the jam, then gently pour in the filling mixture.
  • Bake in the bottom of the oven for 15 minutes, then move to the middle of the oven and bake for a further 15 minutes, or until the pastry is puffed and golden brown.
  • Serve on its own or with fresh raspberries and maybe a little whipped cream.

 

Regula Ysewjin’s Puff Pastry

Extracted with permission from Pride and Pudding: The History of British Puddings by Regula Ysewijn

Makes enough for two 20 cm (8 inch) pies. It works better to make the whole recipe and freeze the remainder if you only need half the pastry.

Ingredients
225 g (8 oz/1½ cups) plain (all-purpose) flour
½ teaspoon fine salt
240 g (83/4 oz) cold butter
130 ml (4¼ fl oz) ice-cold
Water

Method

  • Put the flour in a large bowl, or the bowl of a food processor, and put it in the fridge to get cold.
  • Meanwhile, cut the butter into small cubes and put it into the freezer with the water for a few minutes.
  • Put the flour into the food processor and toss in the butter. Before you start the processor, use a knife to stir the mixture so every cube of butter is covered in flour. Give two short pulses of about 1 second, then add half the water, pulse again for 3 short pulses, then add the rest of the water and pulse 6 times.
  • Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Don’t be alarmed if you think the dough is too crumbly; it’s supposed to be that way. Pat the dough into a sausage, then use a rolling pin to flatten it out to a rectangle. The dough should be quite rough and very marbled with butter. If it is barely holding together at the edges, this is normal.
  • Fold the right side of the rectangle to the middle and then do the same with the left side of the pastry. Flatten the dough slightly with the rolling pin, then fold up the bottom third of the dough,
  • followed by the top third, to make a small square of dough.
  • Again, flatten the dough slightly, wrap in plastic wrap and put it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
  • Roll out when needed and proceed as instructed in the recipe.

 

Kavey Eats received a review copy of this title from publisher Murdoch Books. Pride and Pudding: The History of British Puddings by Regula Ysewijn is currently available from Amazon for £16.59 (RRP £20).

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Jun 152016
 

Over the last few weeks I’ve been gorging myself on delicious Kesar mangoes from India. Alphonso mangoes aren’t very good this year, their flavour not as sweet and their scent not as perfumed as usual but the Kesar ones have been superbly delicious. I’ve bought box after box from my local Asian grocery store, shared with family and friends or eaten at home with sleeves rolled up and an apron protecting my clothes.

The last box I picked up wasn’t ready to eat when I bought it so I had to wait, impatiently, for the fruits to ripen. When they did, they did so fast and it wasn’t long before they continued on from perfectly ripe to starting to rot. I quickly cut open the last four mangoes, slicing and scooping all the flesh out of them before they turned. That left me with 700 grams of top quality mango flesh in the fridge.

I thought about freezing the mango flesh in small portions to throw straight from the freezer into smoothies or instant sorbets.

But my thoughts went back to a family barbeque we recently enjoyed with family friends – three generations of our two families contentedly sharing an afternoon around the barbeque, watching my nephew put his recently-discovered walking skills into practice for hour after happy hour. I took a big box of ripe kesar mangoes, my mum took several bottles of home made lassi.

Lassi, for those who aren’t familiar with it, is a popular Indian drink made from natural yoghurt and water. It can be made sweet or salty, the former often enhanced with rosewater or kewra essence, the latter with spices such as cumin. More recently it’s become common to add fruit, with mango lassi becoming increasingly popular both in India and worldwide.

I’m not the first to translate mango lassi into ice lolly form – it’s such a natural progression, especially during the hot summer months and it’s also a great way to enjoy top quality mangoes beyond the all-too-brief mango season.

Mango Lassi Ice Lollies on Kavey Eats (titled 1)

For my mango lassi ice lollies I debated whether or not to blend the mango flesh into the yoghurt but decided to keep the two separate, so that some bites are sweet and heady with mango, while others are refreshingly tart from the yoghurt.

If you prefer, you can blend mango and yoghurt together for an all-in-one style ice lolly.

 

Mango Lassi Ice Lollies

Delicious mango and natural yoghurt ice pops

Makes approximately 8 ice lollies depending on the capacity of your moulds

Ingredients
700 grams fresh mango flesh
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (about 1 medium lime, juiced)
(Optional) sugar to sweeten the mango, to taste
500 grams thick full-fat natural yoghurt
(Optional) sugar to sweeten the yoghurt, to taste

Note: As my mangoes were very sweet, I didn’t add any sugar but if yours aren’t sweet enough, add sugar while blending, to taste.
Note: Likewise, my natural yoghurt was very tart, so I mixed 50 grams of sugar into it – just enough to soften the tartness without eliminating it.

You will also need lolly moulds and lolly sticks. I use disposable plastic cups as moulds, and traditional lolly sticks (easily purchased online).

Method

  • In a blender, combine the mango flesh and lime juice and blend until smooth. If you are adding sugar, add a little at a time, blend thoroughly and taste again before adding more if needed.
  • If adding sugar to the yoghurt, fold it in by hand or your yoghurt will lose its naturally thick texture.
  • Assemble your lolly moulds – as you can see I use disposable plastic cups.
  • Spoon in dollops of the mango mixture and the yoghurt in turn, swirl with a lolly stick to mix if needed.
  • Insert a lolly stick into each mould. If using cups rather than custom-designed ice lolly moulds, you may need to use elastic bands or masking tape to hold the stick upright – mine stayed upright on their own as the mango and yoghurt mixtures were both quite thick.
  • Freeze upright for 24 hours.
  • Once frozen, unmould individual lollies by dipping each mould into a bowl of hot water for a few seconds before pulling the ice lolly gently out.

I used my Froothie Optimum power blender to blend my mango into a super smooth smooth pulp, much as I use it to make smoothies. The powerful motor can also blend solid frozen fruit straight from the freezer to make an instant sorbet. I’ve also made several delicious soups in it as well as custard-based ice creams – it’s a great no-fuss way to make custard from scratch. Fruit curds are also a doddle.

IceCreamChallenge mini

This is my entry for this month’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream challenge, open to all bloggers around the world – if you blog an ice cream, sorbet, ice lolly (or pop), shaved ice or gelato recipe this month, do join in!

Mango Lassi Ice Lollies on Kavey Eats-3

Mango Lassi Ice Lollies on Kavey Eats (tallpin)

If you’re a fan of fresh fruit lollies, you may also like my roasted banana ice lollies and my eton mess strawberry cream and meringue ice lollies.

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A few days ago I shared my review of Mat Follas’ new cookbook, Vegetable Perfection published by Ryland Peters & Small. Click through to read more and to enter my giveaway to win your own copy of the book.

The book shares over 100 vegetarian recipes using the ‘roots, bulbs, shoots and stems’ of a wide variety of vegetables. The recipes are perfect for home cooks, created in a domestic kitchen using domestic kitchen equipment and as such, they are not only delicious but very achievable.

Pete and I have thus far made three recipes from the book, Mat’s Mushroom Toad-in-the-hole, his Homemade baked beans and the recipe I’m sharing with you today, his Four Cheese Cauliflower Cheese. We really liked all three but this one is my favourite so far.

We made half the quantity, which very generously served two.

Cauliflower Cheese from Vegetable Perfection by Mat Follas (mini)

Mat labels this recipe simply as Cauliflower Cheese, but to me that understates the sheer indulgence and tastiness of his use of four different cheeses to create a really complex and cheesy sauce, so I’m embellishing the name to suit its nature!

Mat Follas’ Four Cheese Cauliflower Cheese

Extracted from Vegetable Perfection with permission

This recipe is all about the cheese. Don’t panic if you don’t have all four cheeses, just increase the amount of cheeses you do have to the same overall weight. However, if you do have all four, the combination of their flavours and textures makes an amazing sticky lava flow of cheese that cannot be beaten.

Ingredients
2 large cauliflowers
30 g butter
30 g plain flour
500 ml whole milk
100 g grated strong Cheddar cheese
100 g grated Gruyère cheese
50 g grated Parmesan cheese
120 g sliced mozzarella cheese
1–2 teaspoons English mustard
1–2 splashes of Tabasco sauce, to season
a pinch of smoked paprika
table salt, to season
olive oil, to coat
(Optional) tomato salad, to serve

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F) Gas 3.
  • Prepare the cauliflower by trimming the leaves off, then slicing across the base in 2-cm slices, like slicing a loaf of bread. Lightly oil the cauliflower slices on both sides and season with a little salt.
  • Preheat a griddle pan over a medium heat, then cook the cauliflower slices for 2–3 minutes on each side, to just char and par-cook them. This should leave the cauliflower cooked one-third of the way through on each side.
  • Lay the slices in a casserole dish, overlapping to fit them all in.
  • To make the sauce, begin by making a roux. Put the butter and flour in a dry saucepan and set over a medium heat until the mixture forms crumbs and is just starting to colour. Slowly, add about 125 ml of milk and whisk to combine into a smooth, thick paste. With the pan still on the heat, keep adding the milk 125 ml at a time and whisk together to combine until all of the milk has been added to the sauce and it is thin and smooth.
  • Reduce to a low heat and add two-thirds of the Cheddar, Gruyère and
  • Parmesan cheeses to the sauce. Whisk gently until the sauce is smooth, then add the mozzarella cheese. Whisk until the cheese has melted and you have a smooth sauce.
  • Add a large teaspoon of mustard, a generous splash of Tabasco sauce and a pinch of salt, and whisk together. Taste the sauce and add more mustard, Tabasco sauce or salt as you like it.
  • Pour the sauce over the cauliflower, then sprinkle the remaining cheese over and finish with the smoked paprika to decorate and add a hint of smoke. At this stage, you can store the cauliflower cheese in a fridge for up to 2 days.
  • Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes (20 minutes if it has been chilled in the fridge). Check that it is cooked by probing with a fork to ensure there is no hard centre. Turn the oven up to 200°C (400°F) Gas 6 for 5 minutes to brown the cheese topping.
  • Serve 2–3 slices of cauliflower with the sauce per person with a tomato salad on the side.

 

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Vegetable Perfection from Ryland Peters & Small and was given permission to publish this extracted recipe. Vegetable Perfection by Mat Follas (photography by Steve Painter) is currently available from Amazon for £14.88 (RRP £16.99).

May 152016
 

We recently spent a lovely few days visiting our friends in their gorgeous rural home in Monmouthshire. While they were at work, Pete and I took over their large kitchen (with beautiful views of the countryside) and cooked up a storm. Having packed our new Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle maker, on our first full day in the kitchen we went waffling mad, making rich, decadent double chocolate waffles for breakfast followed by smoky paprika and cheesy potato ones for lunch, both big successes and utterly delicious.

We thought (briefly) about having a non-waffle breakfast the next morning and got as far as discussing toast, bacon and eggs. But the thought of hot buttered toast with Marmite, a breakfast staple in both houses, lead me to suggest Marmite Waffles instead and the very enthusiastic response to the idea meant there was no going back!

We adapted the Classic Waffle recipe from the Smart Waffle maker guide book, reducing the sugar and adding Marmite, and to our delight, the waffles came out beautifully. Just the right amount of Marmite flavour, not so subtle that you struggle to taste it but not overwhelmingly strong either.

These are light waffles perfect to serve straight out of the waffle maker with soft boiled eggs and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.

As Pete discovered, on nibbling a leftover waffle that afternoon, these are also great cold as a savoury snack.

Marmite Waffles on Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle (2)

Marmite Waffles Recipe

Makes 5 waffles in the Smart Waffle maker

Ingredients
80 g butter, melted
300 ml milk, warmed to tepid
2 level tablespoons (or 2 very heaped teaspoons) Marmite, or your preferred brand of yeast extract
2 large eggs
200 grams plain flour
1 tablespoon caster sugar
1 generously heaped teaspoon baking powder

Method

  • Preheat your waffle maker. We used the Smart Waffle’s Classic setting, and set the Lightness-Darkness dial to two lighter than the middle notch.

Marmite Waffles on Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle (4) Marmite Waffles on Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle (5)

  • Whisk butter, milk, marmite and eggs together.
  • Place dry ingredients into a large bowl.
  • Add wet ingredients to dry ones and whisk to form a runny batter.
  • Pour batter into waffle maker; don’t overfill.
  • Cook for about 3 minutes, or until nicely browned and crisp on the surface.

Marmite Waffles on Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle (3)

  • Remove and serve hot.

To read more about the Smart Waffle from Sage by Heston Blumenthal, check out this post where I share a recipe for very indulgent and delicious Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Belgian Waffles.

Marmite Waffles on Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle (1)

Here are a few more waffle ideas featuring well-known food brands:

 

Kavey Eats received a Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle for review. As always, I was not expected to write a positive review; all opinions are my own and I recommend only products I truly believe in. This post contains affiliate links; please see my sidebar for further information.

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