When you have a waffle maker, everything looks like a waffle!’ So says a dear friend of mine and I reckon he’s not wrong.

It’s full steam ahead on the waffle wagon here at Kavey Eats and today it’s the turn of the humble potato. Our first experiment with potato waffles used mash potato mixed with egg, a little flour, a little cheese and seasoning. The idea worked pretty well but the waffles were a bit of a faff to make, a little bland and they didn’t crisp up as we’d hoped.

So my next thought was to try the potato rösti route. I recently had great success in adapting potato rösti into a pizza base, so I was hopeful it would make a great waffle.

Parmesan Paprika Potato Waffles - Kavey Eats-8254

For our first attempt we completely winged it, guestimating quantities and method by eye, and assuming we’d need to tweak the recipe at least once or twice before it was ready to share. But we totally nailed it on the first attempt and I’m urging you to make these for yourself and tell us what you think!

You need just three core ingredients plus a little oil to create these crispy-surfaced, gooey-centred waffles with a gentle smoky flavour and heat from the paprika.

Parmesan Paprika Potato Waffles - Kavey Eats (1)

Parmesan & Paprika Potato Waffles

Makes 4 waffles in the Smart Waffle maker

Ingredients
500 g raw potato, grated
2 tbs vegetable oil
100 g parmesan, finely grated
1 teaspoon smoked paprika

Note: I used La Chinata smoked paprika which has a wonderful flavour and a nice kick of heat.

Method

  • Preheat the waffle maker.
  • Mix 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil through the grated potato and microwave until soft; 3-4 minutes.
  • Mix the paprika through the grated cheese and then add to the cooked potato.

Parmesan Paprika Potato Waffles - Kavey Eats-8247

  • Mix well to distribute cheese throughout the mix.
  • Spoon a quarter of the mix into each side of the waffle maker and close, and leave to cook for about 5 minutes.
  • Remove and set aside on a hot dish or in a very low temperature oven for a few minutes until all the waffles are ready.
  • Repeat with second half of the mixture.
  • Serve hot and crisp!

Parmesan Paprika Potato Waffles - Kavey Eats (2)

You may also enjoy these savoury waffle recipes from fellow food bloggers:

 

Kavey Eats received a Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle for review. As always, I was not expected to write a positive review; all opinions are my own and I recommend only products I truly believe in. This post contains affiliate links; please see my sidebar for further information.

 

A few days ago I shared my review of Grow Your Own Cake, published by Frances Lincoln. Click through to read more and to enter my giveaway to win your own copy of the book.

This intriguing cookbook features 46 recipes for savoury and sweet cakes and bakes featuring vegetables and fruits you can grow yourself. The author Holly Farrell, an experienced gardening writer, shares invaluable tips on how to grow and harvest each crop, before putting it to use in the recipe provided. Photography is by Jason Ingram, who illustrates both gardening tips and recipes throughout the book.

growyourowncake grown your own cake sweet potato
Book jacket; sweet potato image by Jason Ingram

Pete and I have thus far made two recipes from the book, an Upside-down Pear Cake and this Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake, published below with permission from Frances Lincoln. I love the idea of taking a combination associated with American Thanksgiving menus and turning it into a cake.

We weren’t sure what to expect from this cake – in taste, in texture, in appearance. To our surprise the crumb is actually fairly light and not overly sweet, in fact it’s a lovely gently flavoured sponge which would work very well on it’s own, without the ganache filling or marshmallow fluff topping. We over-baked by just a few minutes, which gave the outside a slightly darker colour, but it didn’t affect the taste at all.

I am not sure adding mini marshmallows into the batter serves much purpose – as the cake cooks they seem to melt away leaving odd pockets in the sponge, lined with a crunchy sugar glaze – so I might skip those next time. The sweet potato cake is the real winner in this recipe, and you could lose the marshmallow elements if you wanted to and serve it as a simple unadorned sponge.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats (2)

Sweet Potato & Marshmallow Cake

If sweet potato & marshmallow casserole, the traditional Thanksgiving dish, is too sweet for your turkey dinner, use this great pairing in cake form instead. It is perfect after a long winter’s walk.

Makes a two-layer cake

Ingredients

Mashed sweet potatoes
800–900g/1lb 12oz–2lb sweet potatoes

Cake
400g/14oz plain flour
11⁄2 tbsp baking powder
3⁄4 tsp salt
1⁄4 tsp black pepper
1⁄2 nutmeg, finely grated, or 1⁄2 tsp ground nutmeg
165g/51⁄2oz unsalted butter
250g/8oz light muscovado sugar
4 eggs
450g/1lb mashed sweet potatoes
90g/3oz mini-marshmallows

Ganache
45ml/11⁄2fl oz double cream
100g/3oz white chocolate

Decoration
1⁄2 jar of marshmallow fluff (about 100g/31⁄2oz)
100g/31⁄2oz marshmallows

Equipment
2 × deep, round cake tins, 20cm/8in diameter, greased and base-lined

Method

  • For the mashed sweet potatoes, preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4. Roast the sweet potatoes for around 45 minutes until they are soft. Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely, then pop them out of their skins. Mash well (use a potato ricer if you have one).
  • For the cake, preheat the oven to 170°C/325°F/gas mark 3.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8309 Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8313

  • Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper and nutmeg in a bowl and mix well; leave to one side. Beat the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well to incorporate after each egg. Mix in the mashed sweet potato, then the flour and spice mix. Quickly stir in the mini-marshmallows and divide the cake mixture between the two tins. Make sure that all the marshmallows on the surface are coated with mixture to prevent them burning. Bake for 50–60 minutes. To check if it is ready insert a skewer into the cake; if it comes out clean the cake is cooked. Remove from the oven and leave for 10 minutes in the tins, then turn out on to a wire rack to cool completely.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8314 Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8316

  • For the ganache, heat the cream in a small saucepan over a medium heat until just under boiling point. Pour over the chocolate and stir until it has melted and is smooth. Leave to cool until the mixture is thick enough to spread without running.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8319 Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats-8329

  • To assemble, sandwich the two cake layers together with the ganache, spread marshmallow fluff on the top and sprinkle with whole marshmallows.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats (1)

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Grow Your Own Cake from Frances Lincoln, part of Quarto Publishing Group UK. Grow Your Own Cake by Holly Farrell, photographs by Jason Ingram is currently available from Amazon for £14.88 (RRP £16.99).

 

PARTNEREDPOSTPotatoes have been getting a bit of a bad rap lately. The last couple of decades have witnessed a vilification of carbs; the noughties in particular saw a surge in uptake of diets advocating a severe reduction of carb intake. Even for those not following a low-carb diet, potatoes often lose out to pasta and rice, perceived as quicker and easier options.

But actually, potatoes are a versatile and very healthy ingredient – they’re inexpensive, 100% natural and unprocessed; they are low in fat and sugar and an excellent source of fibre and potassium; and they store very well – when we’ve had a particularly generous crop of home grown, we’ve been able to enjoy them for several months after harvesting by keeping them in a cool, dark cupboard.

Of course, they are also available to buy throughout the year – whether you shop at your local supermarket, independent grocer’s or food market. I like to buy by variety, experimenting to make up my own mind – do King Edwards or Maris Pipers make the best roasties? Are Charlottes or Red Duke of Yorks best for potato salad?

These days most retailers also label potatoes to indicate whether they are suitable for baking, boiling, mashing, frying and so on – the rule of thumb is that waxy varieties and new potatoes are great for potato salads because they hold their shape and texture well when boiled. Fluffier varieties are best for baking and roasting, and make fabulous chips. There are also many potatoes that can be considered good all-rounder varieties; find out more from the AHDB’s Potato Variety Database.

But the question remains – can you create a quick and delicious weekday supper using potatoes in the same time as it might take you to rustle up a pasta dinner or stir fried rice?

Of course, the answer is yes!

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (4)

We were challenged to create and share a new potato recipe, something quick, easy and suitable for a weekday lunch or dinner and a little adventurous and different to boot. I hope you’ll agree that our Röstizza – using a potato rösti as a gluten free pizza base – is just that!

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (2)

The Röstizza: Potato Rösti Pizza Base

Serves 2
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes

#glutenfree #quick #easy #recipe

Ingredients
400 grams potatoes
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
15-20 grams butter
2 teaspoons finely grated parmesan
1 teaspoon salt
75 grams grated mozzarella cheese
2 tablespoons pizza sauce
Optional: Very thinly sliced salami or chorizo sausage or other toppings of your choice

Equipment
28 cm frying pan
Electric or gas hob
Grill

Note: We use a food processor to grate the potatoes and buy ready-grated mozzarella cheese for this recipe. Add a little more prep time if you grate both by hand.

Method

  • Peel and grate the potatoes.
  • Microwave the grated potatoes in a bowl for approximately 1 minute on full power, until piping hot.
  • In the meantime, heat butter and oil in a frying pan on a medium heat.
  • Retrieve grated potatoes from the microwave, add grated parmesan and salt and mix thoroughly.
  • Add potato mixture to the pan, toss briefly to coat well in butter and oil, then spread out to create a flat and even rösti, pressing down firmly.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7606

  • Fry the rösti pizza base for about 12-15 minutes until golden brown beneath, checking by lifting an edge very carefully with a spatula towards the end of the cooking time. The time will vary depending on your frying pan and the exact level of heat.
  • Once the bottom edge is golden brown, use two plates to help flip the rösti over: Place the first plate upside down over the pan, use oven gloves to grip both plate and pan firmly together and flip over to transfer the rösti onto the plate. Now use a second plate to flip the rösti over again. Pour out any remaining oil from the pan if need be, before placing it upside down over the second plate, and flipping both over one last time. The rösti should now be upside down within the frying pan. This isn’t as complicated as it sounds, and much less risky than trying to flip the fragile rösti directly in the pan.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7609 Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7613

  • Preheat the grill to high.
  • Turn the heat on the hob up to high and add the toppings over the golden brown surface. First spread the pizza sauce, then the grated cheddar and then add any additional toppings such as salami slices, mushrooms or other vegetables. This should take no more than 4-5 minutes, allowing the second side of the rösti to crisp up.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7616 Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7623

  • Transfer the pan to the grill for about 2 minutes, until the cheese is melted and starting to colour.
  • Serve immediately.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (1)

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (3)

As you can imagine, it’s easy to ring the changes by switching what you put on top.

Try pesto instead of a tomato-based pizza sauce or skip the sauce entirely for a pizza bianco.

Use a mixture of cheeses to create your own quattro formaggi (four cheeses).

As for toppings, you could opt for ham and cheese, pepperoni and jalapeno or a wonderful vegetarian medley of mushrooms, onions or peppers.

For more quick and easy potato recipes, check out:

This recipe was commissioned by Love Potatoes, as part of their ‘Potatoes: More than a bit on the side’ campaign. Visit their website for more great potato recipes and detailed nutritional information.

 

Wary of degradation from a slightly longer than ideal stint in the freezer, I wondered what to make with our last portion of last year’s skrei (beautiful Norwegian cod from the Barents sea). Fish pie was on my mind, but I didn’t fancy the cod and boiled egg fish pie recipe we have made previously; and with just short of 600 grams of cod, I didn’t want to make a mixed seafood fish pie either, though I’m sure salmon, smoked fish or perhaps some big juicy prawns would be a tasty combination.

Instead, I remembered how much I like the combination of chorizo and cod in this baked chorizo, cod and potatoes recipe that we’ve made several times.

An idle search on Google revealed surprisingly little variation in fish pie recipes, so I decided to go out on a limb and pull together a recipe using flavours I felt would work well together , even if no one else had combined them in a fish pie before – we made a chorizo, pea and cod filling topped with buttery mashed potato and it was marvellous; definitely one to make again!

Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-textoverlay

I used a full 200 gram Unearthed cooking chorizo, which was a generous amount. Reduce to 100 grams for just a hint of chorizo, 150 grams for a decent hit or stick to my 200 grams for a chorizo feast. We only had 100 grams of frozen peas left, but I’ll up to 150-200 grams next time, as per my original intention. Although cooking chorizo releases some oil as it cooks, I add more to the pan to ensure sufficient flavoured oil to make the white sauce.

Kavey’s Chorizo, Cod & Pea Pie Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients
100-200 grams cooking chorizo, 1 cm dice
3 tablespoons cooking oil
1 pint milk
570 grams cod fillet, skinned and checked for bones
4 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped
Generous knob of butter
1-2 tablespoons plain white flour
150-200 grams frozen petit pois

Method

  • Cook chorizo and cooking oil over a medium flame until chorizo is just cooked through.
  • Remove chorizo from the pan using a slotted spoon. Pour chorizo-flavoured oil into a separate bowl or jug. Set both aside.
  • Heat the milk in a saucepan and poach the cod over a low flame until cooked through, approximately 15 minutes depending on the thickness of your fillets.
  • While the cod is poaching, put your potatoes on to boil, drain once cooked and mash with a little butter.
  • Once the cod is cooked, strain the milk from the pan, set aside in a jug or bowl.
  • Gently break the cod into small pieces, set aside.
  • Combine 3-4 tablespoons of chorizo-flavoured oil with the flour and cook for a few minutes, then add strained poaching milk and simmer until the sauce thickens.
  • Preheat the oven to 180 C (fan).
  • Place cod, chorizo and peas into a casserole dish, pour over the chorizo-flavoured sauce and gently mix to combine.
  • Spoon the buttery mash over the pie filling and use a fork to create a spiky surface.
  • Transfer to the oven and cook until the potatoes brown nicely on top, about 20-25 minutes.
  • Serve immediately.

Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-170407 Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-171247
Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-180038 Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-180148
Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-180751 Chorizo-Cod-Peas-Fish-Pie-KaveyEats-(c)KavitaFavelle-184743

I think this recipe is a winner and I’d love you to give it a try and let me know how you get on and what you think!

Need more inspiration? Check out these Ten Fantastic Fish Pie Recipes:

And two related recipes:

 

I’ve shared three Potato Dauphinoise posts on Kavey Eats over the years – the easy recipe I learned at the Waitrose cookery school, a caramelised onion version and a sweet potato and ham Dauphinoise. The original easy recipe also includes a variation substituting chicken stock for the milk, so I guess that’s actually four versions – yes I really do love potato Dauphinoise!

MandolinDauphinoise-1634

To celebrate the launch of Rosie Ramsden’s new book The Recipe Wheel her publishers have sent me one of the book’s recipe wheels to share. As you can see, it includes a number of Rosie’s potato gratin dishes – an exploration of how one can adapt a core dish extensively.

recipewheel MandolinDauphinoise-1629 SweetPotHamDauph-5162

 I thought it would be helpful for to share all my variation recipes in a single place:

Easy Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer the potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Easy Cream & Chicken Stock Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml chicken stock
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • As above, substituting the chicken stock for the milk.

 

Easy Caramelised Onion & Potato Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
500-600 grams large waxy potato such as Desiree, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
3-4 tablespoons sweet and sticky well-caramelised onions (I use ready made)

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until the potato slices have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer about a third of the potatoes into an oven dish, arranging them so they’re reasonably flat.
  • Spread the caramelised onions evenly across the potatoes.
  • Cover with the remaining slices of potatoes.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • The dish will stay hot for several minutes before serving, if you need time to finish other elements of the dish.

 

Sweet Potato & Ham Dauphinoise Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
350 grams sweet potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
150-200 grams regular potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
100-150 grams thick sliced ham, cut into small pieces
Optional: handful of grated cheese

Note: A mandolin makes slicing the potatoes thinly and evenly very easy, but it’s not difficult by hand.

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato and sweet potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until they have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer some of the (mixed) potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat.
  • Scatter some of the ham pieces across them before adding another layer, and continue till all the potatoes and ham are in the oven dish. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • Serve hot.

 

Other recipes you may enjoy:

Creamy Potato, Bacon & Brie Tartiflette on Greedy Gourmet
‘Nduja Gratin on Fuss Free Flavours

 

Kavey Eats received a copy of The Recipe Wheel from Random House.

 

 

We’ve had our slow cooker for years but until recently, we didn’t use it as much as we could have.

We use it to make an overnight chicken stock after every roast chicken dinner: Strip the carcass of meat, throw it into the slow cooker with some water, put it on low and strain in the morning. Done!

Other than that, we used to make the rare stew or curry…

But a few months ago, we started attending a weekly evening exercise class and needed options for a tasty, filling dinner that would be ready to eat as soon as we got home afterwards. We are always exhausted and starving! Since then, we’ve been cooking more stews and curries, and have also been honing our skills at throwing an adhoc selection of ingredients into the pot with growing confidence that the ingredients will all cook in the allotted time, and the volume of liquid will be neither too much nor too little.

Probably the simplest slow cooker dinner of all is jacket potatoes. Of course, we could do these in the conventional oven but that uses far more energy, which seems wasteful to cook a couple of spuds.

Baked-Jacket-Potato-Slow-Cooker-KaveyEats-KFavelle-2014-5164-Pinterest

The potatoes go in around noon.

We buy (or make) our chosen filling and leave it in the fridge until we get home from our class:

  • Our favourite filling is one of the most classic combinations; a pot of sour cream or crème fraiche and lots of grated extra mature cheddar.
  • Lashings of salted butter and home-made smoky paprika coleslaw make another great option.
  • And I’m rather partial to Waitrose smoked mackerel pate or unearthed’s pork or goose rillettes.

By the time we get home, the potatoes are perfectly cooked – the flesh is wonderfully fluffy; the skin is soft (but not crisp).

 

Slow Cooker (Crockpot) Jacket Potatoes

Ingredients
1 medium to large baking potato per person

Plus your chosen toppings, to serve.

Method

  • Wrap each potato tightly in aluminium foil and place into the slow cooker pot.
  • Cook on low setting for seven to eight hours.
  • Remove, unwrap and enjoy while it’s hot!

Slow-cooker-crockpot-jacket-potatoes-5165 Slow-cooker-crockpot-jacket-potatoes-5166

 

Do you have any other slow cooker favourites to recommend?

I’ll be sharing some of our other quick favourites in coming months.

 

You know that thing when you come up with an original recipe idea, and it’s utterly brilliant, and you’re so so pleased with yourself, and it’s so damn tasty, and you’re really excited about sharing your genius new idea with the world…

…and then you search the internet and realise that the old adage “there’s nothing new under the sun” really is true after all, because loads of people have come up with the same idea before you, and now you feel rather deflated?

Yeah. That.

Our home made yakiniku (indoor barbeque) was fantastic but the sliced sweet potato just didn’t work, so we had around 350 grams of thinly sliced sweet potato to use up. We also had 4 thick slices of ham leftover from the cheese, ham and chilli jam pancakes we made the day before that. The leap to creating a sweet potato and ham dauphinoise seemed ingenious!

Well, it was! The resulting dish was so darn delicious that I’m going to share it with you anyway, even if it’s not as much of an innovation as I thought at the time!

We decided to base the recipe on the easy potato dauphinoise recipe we make regularly, so we added 150 grams of regular potato to the sweet. And as we had some grated cheese left over (from those same pancakes), we sprinkled that over the top before baking, too.

SweetPotHamDauph-5160 SweetPotHamDauph-5162
Apologies for the photos – I just grabbed a couple of snaps to record it and I want to share it with you right now!

Sweet Potato & Ham Dauphinoise

Ingredients
200 ml double cream
200 ml full fat milk
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
Salt and pepper
350 grams sweet potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
150-200 grams regular potato, peeled and sliced fairly thin, about 3mm
100-150 grams thick sliced ham, cut into small pieces
Optional: handful of grated cheese

Method

  • In a large sauce pan place the double cream, milk, garlic, salt and pepper on a gentle heat.
  • Preheat the oven to 170 C.
  • Add the potato and sweet potato slices into the hot cream and milk and simmer for 15 minutes, until they have softened a little.
  • Use a slatted spoon to transfer some of the (mixed) potatoes into an oven dish, so that the slices are reasonably flat.
  • Scatter some of the ham pieces across them before adding another layer, and continue till all the potatoes and ham are in the oven dish. You don’t need to worry about being very neat, but it’s best to get an even height to the top layer, so everything bakes evenly.
  • Pour or spoon the remainder of the thickened cream and milk over the potatoes.
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes.
  • Check if done by inserting a knife into the dish; the potatoes should feel soft all the way through.
  • Serve hot.

Tell me, have you had any of those moments I describe at the top of the post?

 

 

On a rainy day in February, when it seemed that half the country had turned into an inland sea, we unexpectedly found ourselves with over four kilos of incredibly fresh, top quality Skrei (line-caught Norwegian cod).

We’d been expecting a far smaller delivery but a miscommunication somewhere along the line resulted in “individual portions” being swapped out for “kilos”, and we were the happy if slightly bemused beneficiaries of the error. After an hour of carefully cutting three gargantuan sides of fish into portions, double wrapping them all in cling film, labelling them with their weight and squeezing all but a couple of them into an already groaningly-full freezer, I took to the web in search of cod recipes.

ChorizoBakedCod-4702
My recipe

With the wind outside slamming never-ending needles of cold rain against the thankfully solid walls and windows, I yearned for something hearty, filling and cheering – the weather howled approval of my demand for punchy flavours, plenty of protein, comforting carbs and copious colour.

A recipe for baked cod with chorizo, potatoes and saffron fit the  bill.

ChorizoBakedCod1-4603 ChorizoBakedCod1-4608
ChorizoBakedCod1-4616 ChorizoBakedCod1-4620
Original recipe

We liked this recipe a lot but agreed it needed quite a bit of tweaking. Against the strong flavours (and colour) of the chorizo, the saffron was lost; I decided it was superfluous. Our sauté pan is pretty large but the half kilo of sliced potatoes was difficult to move around the pan. The potatoes also made it difficult for the heat to reach and soften the leeks in the short time they had to cook before the liquid was added and came to a boil; I decided to cube the potatoes and add the leeks at a much earlier stage. Lastly, instead of plain oil, I used oil that I’d flavoured and coloured with the chorizo to drizzle over the fish before baking.

ChorizoBakedCod-4695
My recipe

My new recipe was everything I hoped.

Cubing the potatoes made them cook more evenly, and also provided lots of edges and corners to crisp up a little in the oven. The softer leeks integrated much better into the chorizo and potato base. And the chorizo-infused oil gave the baked fish a little extra colour on the plate.

 

Baked Chorizo, Cod & Potatoes Recipe

Serves 2-3

Ingredients
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
120 grams soft Spanish chorizo*, cubed or thinly sliced
1 leek, white and pale green parts sliced into thin half-discs
500 grams potatoes, peeled and cubed
120 ml (half cup) water
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
500 grams fresh skrei or cod fillet, cut into two or three portions as required
Handful of fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, for garnish (optional)

Note: Spanish chorizo can be purchased either as a fresh, soft sausage that requires cooking, or a harder and drier cured version which can be eaten as is. Make sure you buy the soft cooking chorizo.

Method

  • Preheat oven to 180 °C (fan).

ChorizoBakedCod-4678

  • Heat three tablespoons of vegetable oil in a large oven-proof pan, add the chorizo and cook over a medium heat until the chorizo starts to change colour, about 2-3 minutes. The oil will take on plenty of colour from the chorizo spices.
  • Carefully retrieve a tablespoon of the cooking oil from the pan and set to one side.

ChorizoBakedCod-4679 ChorizoBakedCod-4683

  • Add the leek and continue to cook for a few minutes, until the leek softens.

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  • Add the potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, for 12-15 minutes, until the potatoes soften a little around the edges.

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  • Add the water, salt and pepper and bring to the boil. As the pan is already hot, this should only take a few moments.

ChorizoBakedCod-4688 ChorizoBakedCod-4690

  • Place the pieces of fish over the contents of the pan and drizzle with the reserved chorizo-flavoured oil.
  • Transfer pan to the oven and bake for 15 minutes, until the cod is opaque. If your fillets are much thicker or thinner than those shown, you may need to adjust cooking time by a couple of minutes in either direction.

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  • Either serve the pan to the table, family style, or plate individual portions. Sprinkle with parsley before serving.

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This is a really simple dish to make. Prep (of chorizo, leeks and potatoes) doesn’t take very long and the entire cooking time is not much more than half an hour, so it’s ideal any day of the week.

 

Kavey Eats received samples of fresh skrei (line caught Norwegian cod) from the Norway Seafood Council.

Aug 282013
 

I’d never made a potato salad before this one.

Well… actually I had made warm salads that include potatoes… but never the dish we traditionally call by that name – new potatoes bound together in a mayonnaise-based dressing.

Several years ago, the American Head of IT where I worked shared his potato salad tips with me, after he hosted the IT summer party in his back garden and I raved about his magnificent potato salad. He’d been a professional chef in his previous career; yes I was surprised at the job change too – for the record, he was very good at both. I wrote his recipe down at the time but mislaid it and by the time I realised, he’d retired and moved back to the States.

But a few tips stuck in my mind.

  • Use lots of fatty bacon and make sure you include all the bacon fat that renders as you cook it.
  • Don’t stint on the mayonnaise.
  • Add chopped capers or gherkins for acidity and crunch.
  • Toss the potatoes in the dressing while they’re still warm.

So one of the dishes I was determined to try with our home grown new potatoes this year was a classic bacon-laced, mayonnaise-heavy potato salad. Of the two early potatoes we’ve grown, Home Guard seems better suited to this dish than Red Duke of York, as it holds it shape better when cooked, so that’s what I’ve used here.

And, of course, the potato salad had to live up to my memories of that magnificent lost recipe.

BaconPotatoSalad-1586

In the end, I made up the recipe on the spot, and by very good fortune, it came out perfectly.

The photos really don’t do this justice at all, which is totally my fault as I decided to make my first ever potato salad less than an hour before we headed out to the annual summer barbecue at our allotments and I only grabbed a couple of snap shots of the finished dish, in the box I mixed (and transported) it in. I should have spooned a neat pile into a small clean bowl to show it off better but instead you’ll just have to take my word for it that this recipe is worth trying.

I’m calling it Heart Attack Potato Salad because of the ratio of dressing to potatoes and the amount of fat in the dressing!

 

Heart Attack Potato Salad

Ingredients
Optional: 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
500 grams firm new potatoes, scrubbed but skins on
100 grams streaky bacon, chopped
125 ml Kewpie Japanese mayonnaise
2 medium pickled gherkins, finely diced

BaconPotatoSalad-1577

Note: Kewpie mayonnaise is made with egg yolks rather than whole eggs, which makes it much richer than typical European commercial mayonnaise brands. The apple and malt vinegars give it a slight sweetness and the MSG creates an umami richness. If you can’t get it, either make a rich home-made mayonnaise or substitute with regular and add a small pinch of sugar.

Note: I like the sweet style pickled gherkins rather than the very sour type or the dill pickle ones, so that’s what I used here.

Note: Bacon doesn’t need any additional oil to fry, but adding a touch of extra oil at the beginning lets it take on lots of bacon flavour, to add to the dressing if your bacon doesn’t render much out. For a very slightly healthier version, omit the vegetable oil.

Method

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  • Chop your new potatoes in half or quarters, depending on size, and put them on to boil. My preference is for bite size pieces in a potato salad, though some people prefer much smaller dice.

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  • Add a tablespoon of oil to a frying pan (if using) and gently fry the chopped bacon. I don’t like bacon fried until it’s crunchy, so I fried mine until it showed a little browning but was still soft.

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  • Allow the bacon to cool a little, then combine bacon, bacon fat / cooking oil and mayonnaise and mix well. You’re adding a lot of extra fat to the mayonnaise emulsion so it may take a bit of effort to mix it into a smooth dressing.

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  • Once the potatoes are cooked through, drain and leave in the pan to steam and dry a little further.

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  • While the potatoes are still warm, mix thoroughly with the dressing. If you like, you can do this by putting potatoes and dressing into a sealed container and gently shaking and turning.
  • Serve warm or cold.

As a potato salad novice, I’d really like to hear about your favourite potato salad recipes or tips. I was utterly delighted with the tastiness of my first attempt, which I’ve shared here, but now I’ve dipped my toe in, I’m keen to discover more excellent home-made potato salad recipes. All advice welcome!

 

I remember very clearly when the all new Sainsbury’s magazine was launched back in May 1993. Back then, supermarket magazines were pretty wretched; thin and cheaply produced with a dearth of compelling content.

The Sainsbury’s magazine pumped oxygen into a stagnant pond and I loved it from the get go! Delia Smith and husband Michael Wynn-Jones were at its helm and commissioned great content, assembling a team of talented food writers, cooks and chefs. Some were at the start of their careers and others already well established; together they produced a rich collection of material for every single issue. And for just £1 it was excellent value, even in those days!

One of the strengths of the magazine was the reliability of the recipes featured. They were always properly tested and clearly written so those of us who made them did so with confidence.

Fast forward 20 years and while the quality of the field has definitely improved (and dropped again, as in the case of Waitrose Food Illustrated when it changed to Waitrose Kitchen), Sainsbury’s magazine is still going strong.

To mark its 20th anniversary, Sainsbury’s has produced a celebratory cookbook featuring over 100 recipes chosen from an extensive archive.

Unlike some glossier and trendier recipe books I’ve flicked through lately, what I love about this collection is how many of them I want to make (and feel confident that I can make).

SainsburysMag

The good news is that I have one copy of the book to give away to a lucky reader.

But first, let me share the first recipe we made from the book, Brian Glover’s pea, new potato and feta frittata.

Frittata-1420

Frittata is such a versatile dish – it can be enjoyed both hot and cold, it’s ideal for lunch or dinner, for picnics or packed lunch boxes and it’s very simple to make.

We took Brian’s suggestion to substitute the feta for goat’s cheese, as we much prefer it.

Frittata-1392

 

Pea, New Potato & Goat’s Cheese Frittata

Serves 4

Ingredients
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
500 grams new potatoes, peeled and sliced
1 teaspoon fresh thyme chopped or 0.5 teaspoon dried
200 grams frozen peas*
a good knob of butter
6 large eggs, beaten
100 grams goat’s cheese (or feta), crumbled
optional: a handful of peashoots

*The original recipe specifies podded peas, but we bought fresh pods and discovered enormous, tough-skinned, tasteless peas within so we substituted with sweet little frozen peas instead. We weighed them frozen, then left them in a bowl of tepid water for a few minutes before draining and using. The recipe calls for boiling the podded fresh peas for 4 minutes before adding to the frittata pan.

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Method

  • Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a 23-25 cm non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and 2-3 pinches of salt, and stir. Cover, turn down the heat and sweat the onions for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

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  • Add the potatoes and thyme to the pan and cook, still covered, for 10-12 minutes until the potatoes are just tender, adding the extra oil if they are drying out.

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  • Uncover the pan and turn up the heat until the potatoes start to colour.

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  • Add the butter and, when melted, add the peas, Season the eggs and pour into the pan, stirring in the cheese and pea shoots. Preheat the grill.

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  • Cook the frittata over a medium heat, drawing in the edge with a spatula until the base sets. After 4-5 minutes, when the underside has browned, put the pan under the grill for 2-3 minutes to just set the top.

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  • Place a large plate over the pan and turn over plate and pan together, to remove the frittata from the pan.

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We really enjoyed the frittata, both hot out of the pan for dinner and cold for lunch the next day.

Frittata-1425 Frittata-1428

COMPETITION

Sainsbury’s have offered a copy of their 20th anniversary Sainsbury’s Magazine Cookbook to one of my readers. The prize includes free delivery within the UK.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the competition in 3 ways:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
Leave a comment below, telling me about one of your family’s favourite recipes.

Entry 2 – Facebook
Like the Kavey Eats Facebook page and leave a (separate) comment on this blog post with your Facebook user name.

Entry 3 – Twitter
Follow @Kavey on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the (exact) sentence below.
I’d love to win the 20th anniversary @sainsburysPR Magazine Cookbook from Kavey Eats! http://goo.gl/im02D9 #KaveyEatsSainsburysCookbook
(Please do not add my twitter handle into the tweet; I track entries using the competition hashtag. And you don’t need to leave a blog comment about your tweet either, thanks!)

RULES & DETAILS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 6th September 2013.
  • Kavey Eats reserves the right to alter the closing date of the competition. Changes to the closing date, if they occur, will be shown on this page.
  • The winner will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • The prize is a copy of the 20th Anniversary Sainsbury’s Magazine Cookbook, with free delivery within the UK.
  • The prize cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • The prize is offered and provided by Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Ltd.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. One Facebook entry per person only. You do not have to enter all three ways for your entries to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, winners must be following @Kavey at the time of notification. For Facebook entries, winners must Like the Kavey Eats Facebook page at time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contacting the winner.
  • The winners will be notified by email, Twitter or Facebook. If no response is received within 7 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

 

Kavey Eats was sent a review copy of the Sainsbury’s Magazine Cookbook.

This competition is closed. The randomly selected winner was Tracy Nixon.

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