These ice lollies were based on a roasted banana paletas recipe I spotted online a while ago. A paleta is a Latin American ice lolly featuring fresh fruit mixed into a water or cream base – what we call an ice lolly in the UK, the Americans call an ice pop and the Canadians a popsicle!

The recipe I saw used yoghurt which I have switched out for double cream – I do enjoy the tang of natural yoghurt with fresh fruit but for these lollies I wanted the banana to be the star of the show.

Roasting the banana brings out a softer, sweeter flavour than using it raw, but of course you can use it uncooked if you prefer.

Cinnamon is a natural bedfellow for banana but is often added in quantities that make it the dominant flavour; I wanted a mere hint that would add complexity to the banana rather than overwhelm it. Likewise, adding just a small amount of vanilla added a subtle savoury flavour without making its presence felt too strongly. You can omit either of them entirely or adjust up or down to suit your taste. I reckon a generous handful of chocolate chips would be a great addition too – to be tried next time!

Roasted Banana Ice Lollies aka Paletas Ice Pops Popsicles - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle -overlay 1

Roasted Banana & Cream Ice Lollies

Makes 4-6 depending on capacity of lolly mould

Ingredients
3 medium to large ripe bananas
50 grams Demerara sugar or light brown sugar
300 ml double cream*
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
(Optional) half teaspoon vanilla bean paste (or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)

* For American readers, the closest substitute to double cream is heavy cream; if you can find a non UHT version, so much the better.

Method

  • Wrap the unpeeled bananas individually in foil and roast at 200 °C (400 °F) for half an hour.
  • In the meantime, measure the sugar into a bowl and set aside.
  • Remove the bananas from the oven. When you can safely do so without burning your fingers, unwrap each banana and peel and scoop the soft flesh into the bowl of sugar. Do this while the bananas are still hot and mix thoroughly so that all the sugar is melted by the heat. Using a pair of tablespoons makes it easier to handle hot bananas.
  • Put cream, cinnamon and vanilla (if using) into a blender or food processor and add the banana and sugar mix. Blend until smooth.
  • Divide the mixture into lolly moulds or cups, insert lolly sticks (or teaspoons) and transfer to the freezer.
  • I kept mine quite small so they froze within about 4 hours, but you may need to leave a little longer if make bigger lollies.
  • To serve, cup the mould in warm hands to loosen, or dip very briefly in a bowl of hot water. Slip out of the mould and enjoy!

I used my wonderful Froothie Optimum power blender which quickly made a super smooth thick liquid to pour into my moulds. See my Affiliate links sidebar for more information.

Roasted Banana Ice Lollies aka Paletas Ice Pops Popsicles - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle -overlay 3

This is my entry for the August #BSFIC Cooling Crowd Pleasers challenge.

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If you blog a suitable recipe this month, do link up to the challenge to be included in my end-of-month round up and shared via social media and Pinterest.

Roasted Banana Ice Lollies aka Paletas Ice Pops Popsicles - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle -overlay 2

 

As I write this, it’s pouring with rain outside and has been since I woke up some hours ago. Heavy drops are bouncing hard on the flat roof outside the window, making quickly-dissipating concentric circles one after the other after the other in mesmerising, ever-changing patterns. Grey skies and endless water have washed away the skin-warming heat we experienced just a few weeks ago.

The beginning of July felt like one of those endless summers of childhood. Sunblock was vigorously applied, sun-starved limbs were eagerly exposed, wide-brimmed hats and sunglasses saved us from squinting against the bright light, and barbeques across the nation were eagerly dusted off and put back to use.

For me, there are few snacks that speak of summer as much as ice lollies; the perfect cooling refreshment. Best eaten quickly before the heat starts to drive sticky, melted rivers of sweetness down the stick, onto hands, from there to drip drip drip onto bare feet, or better yet the parched grass underfoot.

Unsurprisingly, most of the entries for this month’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream were made earlier on in the month, when the weather still had us yearning for icy treats.

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Kate, author of Veggie Desserts, is an expert at incorporating vegetables often thought of as savoury, into sweet treats. Her Cucumber and Lemon Popsicles look super refreshing. I’ve often heard people suggest that cucumber has no flavour, but it certainly does, especially when the flavour is allowed to be the star of the show.

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Wonderlusting Lynda is not new to BSFIC but has not entered for a while, so it was such a pleasure to see her bright Coconutty, Carrot & Mango Ice Lollies, a welcome splash of colour and flavour. And how funky does that nail polish look against the orange and red?!

Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle -notext-9048

I was delighted by how well my Eton Mess Ice Lollies turned out – a simple combination of fresh strawberries, sugar, double cream and crushed meringue. I took these along to a barbeque with friends and they seemed to go down well!

fruity yoghurt pops

Kate from Happy Igloo created these attractively layered Fruity Yogurt Pops by combining fresh fruit with natural yoghurt for a healthy ice lolly. Yoghurt makes such great ice lollies, adding a welcome tang to the taste of sweet ripe fruit.

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Great minds think alike – Corina from Searching For Spice also chose to mix natural yoghurt with fruit for her Peach and Banana Ice Lollipops, opting for a two-layer lolly. I love the shape of her moulds too!

debi double cherry popsicles

Debi, author of lifestyle blog Life Currents, made these pretty Double Cherry Popsicles by combining dried and fresh cherries with lemonade. You must check out the adorable penguin lolly mould she used for one of the lollies!

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Caroline’s Chocolate Milk Ice Cream Lollies tasted delicious but the lollipop moulds she tried out didn’t quite work – the head broke off one cow and the stick off the other. The important thing is that they tasted good and hopefully won’t put Caroline off further ice cream experiments!

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I’m so excited by these Korean Inspired Strawberry and Tofu Lollies by Sneige from Orange Thyme. We had been chatting on twitter and I suggested she try something with a Korean influence. I learned when making a traditional Japanese shira-ae salad dressing quite how versatile tofu can be but would never have thought to use it as a base for a sweet ice lolly – so clever!

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Lisa aka the Cookwitch was determined to make some ice lollies this month. Her first attempt – a rhubarb and custard jam, peanut butter and condensed milk experiment – sounded utterly delicious but woefully, it didn’t freeze. However, Lisa came up trumps on her second try, with these Melty Nutella Ice Lollies.

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Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diary is full of colour this week, after she posted her Fruity Lemonade Ice Lollies against a field of yellow. Elizabeth uses her Froothie Optimum power blender to blitz whole lemons for the recipe so these are super sharp, just as her kids like them, but the beauty of the recipe is that you can adjust the sweetness to your personal tastes.

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Last but not least is Fuss Free Flavours Helen’s delightful Cooling Cucumber Elderflower Mint Ice Pops which make great use of a power blender to combine cucumber, mint, elderflower cordial and water for a light and refreshing lolly.

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That’s it for this month – some super ice lollies, I hope you agree.

Keep your eyes open, August’s BSFIC post will be up very soon!

 

Summer means strawberries! It calls to mind strawberry picking at a local farm, strawberries and cream (and Wimbledon), home made strawberry liqueur, hot bubbling pans of strawberry jam and the special pleasure of eating home grown strawberries from the back garden.

It’s also the best time of year to make one of our favourite desserts, Eton Mess, a jumbled mix of fresh strawberries, whipped cream and broken meringues. For those of a tidier inclination who prefer to keep it more elegant, strawberry pavlova is a rather tidier presentation of exactly the same ingredients!

When I set the theme to July’s #BSFIC challenge as Ice Lollies the plentiful fresh strawberries available in the shops just now made it a no brainer.

I made Eton Mess Ice Lollies!

Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle -overtext

 

Eton Mess Ice Lollies (Strawberries, Cream & Crushed Meringue)

Makes 8-10 generous lollies, depending on size of moulds

Ingredients
500 g strawberries, hulled and finely chopped
50-75 g sugar (depending on tartness of strawberries)
300 ml double cream (divided into 2 x 150 ml)
50 g dry meringues, broken into pieces

Note: Make sure you chop the strawberries fairly small, so that each bite of ice lolly has a nice mix of fruit, cream and meringue.

Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-162709 Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-170049 Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle-201045

Method

  • In a large bowl, mix the strawberries, 50 grams of sugar and 150 ml of double cream. If the strawberries are tart, use an extra 25 grams of sugar – the mixture needs to be super sweet as it will be combined with unsweetened cream later.
  • Cover and leave in the fridge for at least two hours. The sugar helps the strawberries to macerate, releasing more juice into the cream.
  • Whip the other 150 ml of double cream until stiff and combine carefully with the macerated strawberry mixture and the crushed meringue.
  • Spoon the mixture into lolly moulds or small cups and insert lolly sticks. The mixture should be thick enough for the sticks to remain upright, but if not, use some sticky tape to keep them in place.
  • Transfer to the freezer overnight until frozen solid.
  • To serve, cup the moulds in warm hands or dip into a cup of hot water for a few seconds to help the lolly slip out of its mould.

Eton Mess Strawberry Cream Meringue Lollies - Kavey Eats - © Kavita Favelle  overtext

I’ve made these lollies for July’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream. I’m also entering them into Allotment2Kitchen’s The Vegetable Palette.

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If you make and blog an ice lolly recipe this month, do join in!

 

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Image from Shutterstock stock library

This month’s theme for BSFIC was Dairy Free – either by use of a dairy substitute or skipping it completely. I hope you enjoy the delicious entries below!

Kip March BSFIC

In that brief sunny period at the beginning of March, when it seemed as though spring had firmly sprung, Kip the Messy Vegetarian Cook created this Vegan Cream Cheese Ice Cream drizzled with chocolate sauce and hundreds and thousands.

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I was next, with my very first dairy free ice cream. I kept it very simple by combining coconut milk with chocolate and adding a splash of coconut rum for a Bounty-inspired Chocolate & Coconut Dairy Free Ice Cream.

Ros March BSFIC

Baking Addict Ros served her Lemongrass and lime Sorbet with Lime Jelly, creating a lush green and white dessert. She used an egg white to give body and texture to her sorbet, a little like the lemon spoom I made a few years ago.

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Corin from Proware Kitchen made a luscious Cherry Garcia Coconut Milk Ice Cream featuring roasted cherries, black rum and coconut. She is a fan of coconut milk ice cream bases which are light and refreshing but still provide a creamy consistency.

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I love the idea of combining tahini into a frozen banana instant treat, as in Kellie’s Vegan Banana & Cardamom-Tahini Ice Cream on Food To Glow.

Monica March BSFIC

Monica at Smarter Fitter keeps dairy out of the mix entirely in her vibrant Mango Chilli Sorbet made using tinned kesar mango puree. As a mango aficionado I can tell you that kesar, along with alphonso, mangoes make really excellent sorbet, and the additional of chilli must surely add a killer kick.

Helen March

Over at Fuss Free Flavours, Helen has created another vibrant treat, her Blackberry, Apple & Thyme Sorbet. I bet that hint of herb makes this sorbet much more grown up in flavour.

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Hotel Chocolat kindly supported this month’s BSFIC by giving us one of their brand new Milk Free Milk Chocolate easter eggs to give away and after reviewing all the entries, they have selected Kip’s Vegan Cream Cheese Ice Cream to win their new Milk-Free Milk Scrambled Egg easter egg! Well done, Kip!

In the meantime, look out for the next BSFIC challenge, coming shortly!

 

My first thought, when deciding what diary free ice cream recipe to make for this month’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream challenge, was to wonder whether I might be able to make a custard using eggs, sugar and almond milk? It’s still an experiment I’m keen to try.

But I’ve discovered that many people assume dairy free also means egg free – a hangover, perhaps,  from when the dairy aisle of grocery stores sold not only milk products but eggs too. As far as I’m concerned dairy means milk, cream, butter, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. Still, I decided to make a dairy and egg free recipe, so the almond milk custard will have to wait a little longer.

Coconut milk is an great choice for dairy free ice creams because of its high fat content and silky-smooth texture. Inspired by the famous chocolate bar, I went for a chocolate and coconut milk ice cream base, using unrefined caster sugar to sweeten. Do use unsweetened cocoa or dark chocolate for this recipe, as milk chocolate and hot chocolate powders contain milk powder.

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The finished result isn’t quite as rich and creamy as a dairy cream or custard base but it’s still pretty good and I like that the flavour of the coconut milk is quite subtle – almost lost against the chocolate, unless you boost it deliberately.

If you’d like a more obvious coconut flavour – as I did given my chocolate coconut bar inspiration – a slug of malibu does the trick and has the added bonus of making your finished ice cream a little softer and easier scoop.

If you want to make dairy free chocolate ice cream without a pronounced coconut flavour, use a slug of white rum instead. You can, of course, omit alcohol entirely, but this ice cream sets pretty hard even with alcohol added, so you’ll need to leave it out of the freezer for a while before attempting to scoop it.

Bountilicious Chocolate & Coconut Dairy Free Ice Cream Recipe

(& rum and chocolate variant)

Makes approximately half a litre

Ingredients
400 ml full fat coconut milk
50 grams of (unsweetened) cocoa *
50 grams sugar, plus extra to taste
2 tablespoons Malibu coconut rum ~

* If you can’t find unsweetened cocoa, use same weight of good quality dark chocolate (with no milk content) and break into pieces or grate before use. A power blender like mine (see sidebar) has the power to pulverise chocolate into a powder but if you have a regular blender, grate before use.
~ Malibu adds a punch of coconut flavour. For a rum and chocolate ice cream, switch malibu for white rum.

Method

  • Place all ingredients in a blender and blitz until completely smooth; taste to check there is no remaining texture of sugar granules.
  • Do a taste check and add more sugar if you prefer a sweeter flavour.
  • If the blending has warmed the mixture, set aside to cool.
  • Churn in an ice cream machine, according to instructions.
  • Serve immediately or freeze to firm the texture further.

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This is my entry for this month’s Dairy Free #BSFIC. Come back at the end of the month to see a round up of all the entries.

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Fellow bloggers, do join in, you have a couple of weeks left to blog your entry and there’s the added bonus of a delicious prize of dairy free milk chocolate in the form of a Hotel Chocolat easter egg.

 

February came and went without me posting a theme for BSFIC so I’m diving straight into March with a call for Dairy Free recipes.

Whether you use a dairy-free substitute – such as almond, soy or coconut milk – or opt for a sorbet instead, it’s completely up to you.

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Images from Shutterstock stock library

Prize for Best Entry

To help us celebrate this month’s Dairy Free theme, Hotel Chocolat are awarding the best entry of the challenge a delicious treat made from their new dairy-free milk chocolate. Instead of using milk, they have developed a recipe using almond milk, a real treat for dairy-intolerant milk chocolate lovers everywhere.

The prize is one of their new Milk-Free Milk Scrambled Egg easter eggs and includes delivery within the UK.

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To ensure impartiality, I’ll be asking Hotel Chocolat to pick their favourite challenge entry.

Get your thinking caps on, make a dairy free ice cream and blog it for March BSFIC. All entries will automatically be entered into the judging but don’t let this make you feel pressured. We’re looking for fun and simple dairy free ice creams; your post doesn’t have to be polished professional or slick, just tasty and dairy free.

 

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a suitable recipe in March 2015, published by 28th March.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • Include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge (below).
  • Email me (by the 28th of the March) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer) and the link to your post.
  • Please include in your email an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 600 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

I’ll post a round up showcasing and linking to all the entries and I’ll also share your posts via Pinterest, Stumble and Twitter. If you tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC, I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on my Kavey Eats Facebook page.

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For more ideas, check out my my Pinterest ice cream board and past BSFIC Entries board.

 

This month’s Bloggers Scream for Ice Cream was a joint challenge hosted by me and Choclette – BSFIC meets We Should Cocoa. We asked you to give us your chocolatey frozen treats and you obliged!

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Image via Big Spud, provided by Waitrose

First up is this rather impressive Chocolate Passionfruit Baked Alaska from Gary at Big Spud. Using passion fruit to cut through the rich flavour of chocolate makes perfect sense.

Elizabeth

Next, Elizabeth over at Law Student Cookbook combines a classic pairing in her Chocolate Hazelnut Ice Cream. She used roasted hazelnuts to provide both flavour and crunch.

frozen creme fraiche brownie custard

Hannah at Honey & Dough made this lovely Frozen Creme Fraiche Brownie Custard. I love the idea of big chunks of chewy chocolate brownie mixed into the ice cream base, and creme fraiche surely gives a gorgeous tang!

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Janice at Farmersgirl Kitchen took inspiration from ingredients she found in her freezer, to make this White Chocolate Eton Mess Ice Cream. Love the dainty tea cup!

Chocolate Ice Pops

Fellow host Choclette made these delicious Chocolate Ice Pops – chocolate ice cream in a coat of melted chocolate. Using good quality chocolate makes all the difference in recipes like this.

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Jo of Jos Kitchen made triple sure to get chocolate into her recipe with these Triple Chocolate Ice Cream Sandwiches. To a Jamie Oliver chocolate ice cream recipe, she added chocolate chips, and sandwiched the resulting ice cream between chocolate digestive biscuits.

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I’d never even heard of cake batter ice cream till I read Julia’s post on Something Missing but apparently it’s a thing in San Francisco. Julia used vanilla cake mix along with chocolate chips and folded the mixture into an Italian meringue to create her No Churn Birthday Cake Ice Cream.

violet crumble ice cream in bowl

Johanna at the Green Gourmet Giraffe Blog made an amazing sounding Violet Crumble Ice Cream as part of her Australia Day celebrations – the ice cream includes broken up pieces of Violet Crumble, an Aussie chocolate-covered honeycomb bar stirred into a no churn condensed milk and cream base.

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My own entry tastes way better than the photograph might look – it’s an incredibly Rich, Dark & Dense Chocolate Ice Cream. I adapted a recipe I’d made previously on the stove to do the whole thing in my power blender, which worked really well. This mixture would make absolutely killer chocolate ice lollies aka fudgesicles.

Thank you everyone for joining us for our WeShouldBSFIC Mashup!

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I’ll post a theme for January’s BSFIC soon.

 

My initial plan, when Choclette and I set our joint #WeShouldBSFIC challenge for January, was an ice cream sandwich. I wanted to make chewy chocolate chip cookies and sandwich white chocolate vanilla ice cream between them. But every time I started scribbling potential recipe notes, my thoughts turned instead to a chocolate ice cream recipe I shared back in the summer of 2012; a rich, dense and wonderfully dark chocolate ice cream. I still remember the richness of that ice cream!

Like many no-churn recipes, it has a base of condensed milk and double cream (plus regular milk). Unlike most no-churn recipes, it’s not simply a case of folding together whipped condensed milk and cream, adding flavouring and popping into the freezer. It needs the milks and cream to be boiled, the chocolate (and other flavourings) to be melted and thoroughly mixed in, and then a flour thickener added before the mixture is cooked further until it’s so thick you can only just pour it from the pan to a plastic box.

I was keen to see if I could adapt the recipe to make it in my Froothie Optimum 9400. This power blender has such a jet engine of a motor that it not only blends but heats too – there’s no heating element but the friction of the blades at top speed will generate enough heat to make your mixture piping hot. Having already made an ice cream custard base in the Optimum 9400, for my silky smooth white chocolate vanilla ice cream, I was hopeful my adaptation would work.

When I took the ice cream out of the freezer,  I belatedly remembered how dense this ice cream is and how hard it is to scoop. We ended up popping the entire block out of the plastic box and cutting a slice off the end with a knife. It doesn’t look pretty, as the photographed side shows where it slid out of the box and the other side looked even stranger, from where the knife pushed through it.

That’s when I realised this recipe would  be utterly perfect for individual chocolate ice cream lollies, or fudgesicles as Americans call them. As soon as you cut into the ice cream with a spoon, it reveals it’s beautiful smooth texture, utterly silky in the mouth and with a hint of chewiness that reminds of the wonderful mastic ice creams of the Middle East. I took a bite straight out of the slice and oh yes indeed, this would be perfect on a lolly stick! Too bad I didn’t think of that 24 hours ago!

So please use your imagination to see past my appalling photo and trust me when I tell you that you should give this recipe a try.

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Rich, Dense & Dark Chocolate Ice Cream | Made in a Power Blender

Ingredients
200 grams sweetened condensed milk
100 grams whole milk
100 grams double cream
100 grams very dark chocolate, grated or finely chopped*
0.5 scant teaspoon instant coffee granules or powder
1 scant teaspoon vanilla bean paste or extract
Small pinch fine sea salt
1 tablespoon plain flour
1 tablespoon cold water

* Note: To save on washing up, use your power blender to “grate” the chocolate, then pour/ scrape it out of the jug and set it aside.

Method

  • Into the jug, pour the condensed milk, whole milk and double cream. Blend on high power until the mixture is steaming hot.
  • Add the chocolate, instant coffee, vanilla bean paste and salt. Blend on high power again until the chocolate melts and is fully mixed into the cream and milk.
  • In a small bowl, mix the flour and water into a smooth paste, then add to the blender.
  • Blend on high power for 4-5 minutes. The mixture should be thick and glossy.
  • Pour / scrape into a shallow freezer container, or better still, into individual lolly moulds or small paper cups, with lolly sticks inserted.
  • Transfer to the freezer overnight or until solid.
  • To serve, take out of the freezer 10 minutes ahead of scooping (or slicing).

This is my entry for the joint Bloggers Scream for Ice Cream and We Should Cocoa challenge, hosted by myself and Choclette.

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As I’ve mentioned before, I was given my Optimum 9400 along with the opportunity to be an ambassador for the Australian brand, as it breaks into the UK market. Hand on hearts, Pete and I have been enormously impressed with the blender, especially given the price when you compare it to market leaders like Vitamix; (you can read a comparison of the two, here). We’ve made super quick frozen fruit sorbets, delicious vegetable soups (which are blended and heated so quickly that they retain the fresh taste of the vegetables, an unexpected bonus), quick custards (both to enjoy as they are and freeze into ice cream), and we’ve also used it to grate, puree and blend. And yet we’re only at the start of our learning about all that it can do. I’ll continue to share my favourite Optimum 9400 recipes with you here on Kavey Eats. You can access them all via my Froothie tag.

Like this recipe? Here are a few more power blender recipes from fellow bloggers that caught my eye:

Kavey Eats received a review Optimum 9400 power blender from Froothie. Please see the right side bar for a special offer on buying the Optimum with an extended warranty via my affiliate link.

 

We’re welcoming in the new year with a joint blogger challenge between Kavey Eats Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream and Chocolate Log Blog’s We Should Cocoa: #WeShouldBSFIC!

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Images from Shutterstock

The theme is easy. Your recipe needs to be frozen (ice cream, sorbet, gelato, semi-freddo, ice lolly…) and it needs to include chocolate (white, milk or dark, as you like). That’s it! The rest is up to you! You could create a simple chocolate ice lolly or sorbet, mint choc chip ice cream or vanilla stracciatella, a pile of chocolate cookie ice cream sandwiches or a grand black forest ice cream gateau or baked alaska! Whatever your taste, time and fancy dictates!

 

How To Take Part In BSFIC

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

Both Choclette and I will post a round up showcasing and linking to all the entries and share posts via Pinterest, Stumble and Twitter.

If you tweet about your post using the hashtag #WeShouldBSFIC and/or #BSFIC I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share your posts on my Kavey Eats Facebook page.

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For more ideas, check out my my Pinterest ice cream board and past BSFIC Entries board.

 

In retrospect, the Showstoppers theme for Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream was perhaps a little intimidating. The implied requirement for fiddliness, extra effort and fancy presentation didn’t sit well with the demands on our time that are an inevitable part of the season of merriment (aka hustle and bustle). Still, the entries from those who joined in are beautiful, delicious and inspiring. And they don’t all need enormous time, effort or skill!

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I love the contradiction inherent Vanesther of Banger & Mash’ decision to make this incredible Swiss Roll Ice Cream Cake; while she was diligently performing her morning exercises as part of her get-healthy-lose-weight kick, she was also watching cookery programmes on the telly at the same time, which tempted her to make something sweet. Inspired by a Lorraine Pascale recipe, the beauty of this rather fancy-looking dome of tastiness is that it makes use of ready-made Swiss role, a little rum, brandy or apple juice and ready-made ice cream of your choice. Doesn’t it look fantastic?!

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My own effort – Lemongrass & Coconut Ice Cream with Dried Chilli Pineapple Flowers – was partly inspired by a dessert we enjoyed at a Japanese restaurant and partly by Pinterest images of dried pineapple flowers. In the end, the extremely simplified dish I made wasn’t quite the extravagant showstopper I originally envisaged, but I was chuffed to bits with how both elements turned out and added a little indoors sparkler for extra bling. I trialled a few different recipes for the ice cream and have shared a vegan version and a non-vegan no-churn version.

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Like me, Jo from Jo’s Kitchen is a fan of making delicious treats quickly and easily, and also of incorporating leftovers. Here she puts some leftover mincemeat to great use by mixing it into vanilla ice cream and making Mini Mincemeat Ice Cream Bombes. Jo points you at the recipe she uses to make vanilla ice cream, but also advises that you can use good quality shop bought. I imagine the mince meat would also work well mixed into shop-bought vanilla custard and churned from scratch. These are formed in individual moulds, so you could play around with the shape of your mould for extra impact.

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Helen has become the queen of styling, creating really evocative images, particularly her seasonal ones, such as this beautiful Christmas Pudding Ice Cream Bombe. Helen’s inspiration was the thought of what she might serve for Christmas celebrated in warmer climes, though with modern central heating, I think it would go down a treat here too, especially after a traditional and rather heavy Christmas roast! For this bombe she uses a classic no-churn recipe and adds orange zest, brandy and mince meat for flavour and texture.

Monica

Monica from Smarter Fitter has pulled together four beautiful elements to create her showstopper Bourbon and Spiced Pecan Ice Cream – spiced pecans, which she’s since made again to serve on their own, vanilla ice cream, bourbon and home made waffle cones. Having made a bourbon ice cream myself earlier this year (mine with burnt apple rather than spiced pecan) I can say with confidence that bourbon in ice cream is heavenly. Am salivating for this spiced pecan version!

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A new #BSFIC theme for January will go up on the 1st!

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