I have a personal definition of the four seasons which is somewhat at odds with the official one, which assigns three months of the year to each season. In my 2-4-2-4 view, Spring covers the months of March and April, Summer stretches across May, June, July and August, Autumn is the months of September and October and Winter is with us from November right through to the end of February.

So as far as I’m concerned, we’re in Winter now.

Here in the UK, that means cold days and long dark nights but also crackling fires, a warm blanket, comforting food. Ice cream might not be the obvious sweet treat at this time of year but as long as the heating’s on and I’m feeling cosy in a lovely warm house, I am happy to enjoy ice cream all year round.

And don’t forget that the season to be merry is upon us, which gives us an extra excuse to indulge!

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Images of ice cream cakes, sundaes, baked alaskas and semifreddos from
Shutterstock

For this month’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream, I’m calling for Ice Cream Showstoppers – think ice cream cakes, baked alaska, ice cream sundaes, ice cream sandwiches, semifreddo terrines or any other extravaganza of ice cream or sorbet.

And you’re welcome to use shop-bought ice cream for this challenge, by the way. I’m always a supporter of maximum effect for minimum effort!

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a suitable recipe any time in November or December. The deadline is December 28th.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • Include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge (below).
  • Email me (by the 28th of the December) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer) and the link to your post.
  • Please include in your email an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 600 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

I’ll post a round up showcasing and linking to all the entries and I’ll also share your posts via Pinterest, Stumble and Twitter. If you tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on my Kavey Eats Facebook page.

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For more ideas, check out my my Pinterest ice cream board and past BSFIC Entries board.

 

The latest Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream challenge was open for two months and had a wide open theme of Anything Goes.

It’s my pleasure to welcome regulars and newcomers alike to #BSFIC. It’s nice to see bloggers from outside the UK join in too. Here’s the round up of everyone’s tempting creations:

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Corina from Searching for Spice made a delicious Vanilla Ice Cream and Affogato, inspired not only by her love of vanilla ice cream but waking up one morning and discovering that her husband had used the very last of the milk for his cereal and realising that a scoop of vanilla ice cream would be the perfect alternative for her morning coffee! In her post, she shares a recipe for a classic custard-based vanilla ice cream.

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I love the pretty pastel of this Strawberry Vanilla Bean Coconut Ice from Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diary. Although her ice cream machine died last year, Elizabeth has the same power blender I do (see my post here for more about the Optimum 9400 Blender). Eschewing the high-fat, high-sugar recipes she found online, Elizabeth developed a healthy alternative using coconut milk, vanilla, frozen strawberries and maple syrup. It was so good her family and friends deemed it the best ice cream she’s ever made!

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Manion is definitely a blogger after my own heart – I love bourbon and I love brown sugar! In Manion’s case, this combination is also the name of her blog! Her Bourbon and Brown Sugar Ice Cream is a non-churn recipe, which is a technique I use regularly too. Win win! When you visit her blog, check out her recent recipe for ginger cookies – I reckon an ice cream sandwich of this ice cream between those cookies could be a match made in heaven!

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Two bourbons in a row? Don’t mind if I do! The idea for my Burnt Apple & Bourbon Ice Cream came directly from a recipe I spotted on my beloved Pinterest but I developed my own version with a different ice cream base and pushing the apple roasting farther for an edge of bitterness against the sweetness of the custard. Not only is it delicious, the spiced fruit gives it an unexpectedly Christmassy flavour profile.

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Kate, the Gluten free alchemist, used the last of her home grown rhubarb to make this Rhubarb, Blueberry & Honey No Churn recipe, and preserve the summer for just a little longer. There’s also a little pomegranate syrup in the mix too, which must surely give a wonderful depth of flavour. It may be dark outside but this pretty pink ice cream is the perfect antidote!

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For our latest #BSFIC, Julia over at Something Missing has created a Ginger and Blackberry Swirl Ice Cream which replaces cream with a little milk powder to create a rich texture and volume without the fat of cream. A handy trick to balance the increased calorie intake that is almost inevitable at this time of year.

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Laura lives up to her blog name, how to cook good good, by translating a classic combination into ice cream. Her Figs and Honey Ice Cream was inspired by the Mascarpone figue she and her husband so enjoyed in South West France this year.

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Monica lives the perfect balance between healthy eating (check out the rest of her blog for recipes and inspiration) and occasional hedonism. I’d place this fabulous No-Churn Zabaglione Ice Cream firmly in the hedonistic camp – it’s simplified tiramisu in a frozen format! The best thing is that it’s far quicker and easier to make than homemade tiramisu, so no excuses not to make it!

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I’ll be posting the next #BSFIC event soon. In the meantime, enjoy the recipes above and thanks to all the participants.

 

This ice cream is very much inspired by a recipe from The Bojon Gourmet, a blog I discovered via Pinterest. It caught my eye when I was looking for ideas on new ways to put some of our enormous apple harvest to good use. I replaced Alanna’s cream base with a rich and very sweet custard base and roasted my apples until the sugars not only caramelised, but the edges caught and blackened to add texture and a touch of bitterness. I didn’t include a crumble as it tends not to stay crisp for long and our ice creams usually last at least a few weeks in the freezer. That said, this one’s disappearing fast!

Serendipity struck when making the custard ice cream base: I decided to use up 75 grams of sugar mix leftover from a recent apple pie making session. The leftover sugar had a little cinnamon and plain flour mixed into it (for thickening the pie filling) and I topped it up with an additional 25 grams of plain sugar. I blended and cooked my custard using my wonderful Froothie Optimum 9400 power blender, and found that the inclusion of the flour resulted in a beautifully smooth and thick custard.

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Burnt Apple & Bourbon Ice Cream

Ingredients
For the roasted apple

2 medium apples, peeled, cored and diced
2 tablespoons bourbon whiskey
100 grams light brown sugar (I use Billington’s sugars)
0.5 teaspoon cinnamon
0.5 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
Pinch of allspice
For the ice cream base
250 ml double cream
150 ml full fat milk
100 grams sugar
1 pinch salt
3 large egg yolks
0.5 teaspoon cinnamon
Optional: 1 tablespoon plain white flour
To make the ice cream
Custard
2 tablespoons bourbon
Roasted apple mixture

Method

For the roasted apple:

  • Preheat the oven to 200 °C.
  • Toss all the ingredients together to combine and transfer to a small roasting dish. Roast for about 45 minutes, checking on progress once or twice during the cooking time. If the apples are not yet caramelised, with a little charring on some edges, roast for longer until they’re ready.
  • Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. These can be made the day before churning the ice cream and stored in the fridge until needed.

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For the ice cream base:

  • I combined all the ingredients and used my power blender to both mix and cook the custard for several minutes. The speed of the powerful blades generates enough heat to cook the custard while continuing to mix it so that nothing catches. No burnt bits, no lumps and very quick.
  • Alternatively, you can make your custard the traditional way by gently heating cream, milk and half the sugar in a pan until it reaches boiling, then removing from the heat. Meanwhile beat the remaining sugar and egg yolks together in a large bowl. Slowly pour the hot cream and milk over the eggs, whisking continuously, and then pour the combined mixture back into the pan and cook until it thickens. Make sure you stir continuously so that the custard doesn’t catch and burn.
  • Once cooked, set aside to cool. The custard can be made the day before churning the ice cream and stored in the fridge until needed.

To make the ice cream:

  • Add two tablespoons of bourbon to the custard base and mix well.
  • Add the roasted apple mixture. Alanna puréed some of hers and adds the rest whole, but I decided to leave all of it whole. I added only three quarters of the mixture as I thought it would be too much but in retrospect I could certainly have all of it.
  • Churn in an ice cream machine until ready.

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With the fruit, bourbon and spices this ice cream is very reminiscent of mince pies and Christmas pudding.

The Smart Scoop: Sage by Heston Blumenthal

For the last couple of years I’ve been using a Gaggia ice cream machine. I’ve been happy enough with the results, but have sometimes wished it would churn the ice cream till it was just a little more solid. I have worked around this by transferring the finished ice cream to a freezer container and popping into the freezer to solidify further.

When I heard that the Sage by Heston Blumenthal range of appliances included an ice cream machine, called the Smart Scoop, I was intrigued by some of the extra features it offers over my Gaggia. It’s also a good looking machine with its handsome brushed stainless steel surface.

Instead of just having a timer function that switches off when the time is up, the Smart Scoop offers a range of settings from sorbet through frozen yogurt and gelato to ice cream. Once you’ve chosen the texture you’re aiming for the ice cream maker starts freezing and churning. It automatically senses how hard the mixture is so it can alert you when it’s ready. Alterrnatively, you can use manual mode to freeze and churn for a set time according to your own recipes.

There’s an alarm to alert me when the ice cream is ready. I can adjust the volume (or set it to mute) and I can choose between a regular beeper and an ice cream van-style musical tune.

The Smart Scoop also has a function to keep the finished ice cream (or sorbet) at your chosen consistency for up to three hours so I don’t need to come running the moment the alarm goes off.

With our Gaggia, I always have to stay close, especially as the machine comes to the end of it’s timer run. Sometimes the ice cream isn’t finished and I have to turn the dial again to give it more time. Sometimes the motor starts to strain as the ice cream becomes too solid for the machine to churn any further and the paddle stops rotating; then it’s a case of having to switch the machine off quickly and transfer the ice cream into another container to pop into the freezer. The Smart Scoop solves both of these problems.

Niggles?

I wish the Smart Scoop ice cream bowl was dishwasher safe; this seems to me to be an oversight for the modern kitchen.

And of course, like most ice cream machines with integrated freezing unit, it’s large and very heavy. This, of course, is the same for all the models that I’ve come across.

Overall?

I’m really happy with it and shall be sharing many more sorbet, froyo and ice cream recipes to come.

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Other ideas to make the most of apple season:

And if you’re interested in the history of apples, read my post about a Visit to the National Fruit Collections at Brogdale.

This ice cream is my entry into the September / October #BSFIC challenge, Anything Goes.

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Kavey Eats received a review machine from Sage by Heston Blumenthal and an Optimum 9400 blender from Froothie. All opinions are my own. Please see the right side bar for a special offer on buying the Froothie Optimum 9400 with an extended warranty via my affiliate link.

 

Yao Yao Cha means Shake Shake Tea in Chinese. The naming approach tickles me and certainly the little shop in London’s Seven Dials area has shaken up the local bubble tea market since it opened earlier this year. Yao Yao Cha’s founder and owner Susan Fang was born in Taiwan but has lived in New York, Dubai, Seoul, Beijing and now London (a city she describes as the most vibrant she’s lived in to date; I’ll drink bubble tea to that!)

In launching this business she wanted to bring us an authentic taste from her childhood, adding global influences gleaned from her globetrotting lifestyle.

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The storefront on Earlham Street and Dagaz, our friendly server

The menu offers classic Taiwanese bubble tea options alongside modern, global flavours.

Bubble tea (aka boba tea), for those who’ve not come across it before, is simply a glass of (usually) sweetened tea with a generous spoonful of tapioca pearls at the bottom. Served with an extra wide straw that allows you to suck the little spheres of tapioca up as you drink. I’ve found that most people either love or hate the chewy texture of the tapioca, with some of my friends describing them as frogspawn (how do they know?) and others delighting in the bounce, as I do.

Most bubble drink cafes sell a variety of drinks, so if tea isn’t your thing (and there are quite a few different teas to choose from) you one of a range of frappés instead. For tea drinkers, there’s matcha green tea, a range of fruit-flavoured jasmine green teas, several black teas including ones flavoured with salted caramel, chocolate, strawberry and lemon. Frappés include blueberry, mango, passion fruit, chocolate and even crème brulée!

The teas can be ordered hot or cold, though personally I think cold works best with bubbles.

Don’t worry if you don’t think you’ll like traditional bubbles either; another option is to order your drink with fruit pop spheres – tiny liquid-filled spheres available in a range of flavours, with not a hint of chewiness to them. Or maybe you’d prefer a flavoured jelly, chopped into teeny tiny cubes?

Teas are £3.50/ £4.50 (regular/ large) and include a portion of tapioca. Frappés are £4.00 and include one flavour of fruit pops or jelly. Extra fruit pops or jellies can be added to any of the drinks.

Oh and, if you visit in the evening, YYC are usually running a 2 for 1 offer on the bubble teas.

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Sweet milky black tea with lychee pops and salted caramel black tea with tapioca pearls.

Newer to the menu is the range of shaved ice desserts, known as baobing in Chinese and hugely popular across China and much of East Asia.

We had a lovely time chatting to Dagaz who came to London from Taiwan just a few months ago and is really enjoying working in Yao Yao Cha, improving his English and exploring the architecture of London.

On his recommendation, we went for one traditional shaved ice (with condensed milk syrup, taro, crème brulée pudding, tapioca pearls and red bean paste) and one modern option with fruit pops and jellies and a mango fruit syrup.

Tapioca pearls are included for free (if you want them) and the £5 price includes three additional toppings of your choice. Of course, you can add more if you like, for 50 pence per topping. Portions are enormous and one is plenty for two to share, or even three if you’ve just stuffed yourself with huge bowls of ramen, as we had!

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Shaved ice with traditional toppings; shaved ice with mango syrup and a selection of fruit pops and jellies

With lots of great restaurants in the immediate vicinity, I hope lots of Londoners discover the pleasure of a shaved ice dessert. With all the sugary toppings, it’s not a healthier option but it makes a refreshing alternative to the creaminess of ice cream and it’s particularly appealing when the weather is warm.

 

Kavey Eats was a guest of Yao Yao Cha.

 

I was dreadfully late in publishing the round up of entries into August’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream, which was a joint challenge with Belleau Kitchen’s Random Recipes. Since it seems a bit unfair to expect anyone to participate in a September challenge in the half month remaining, I’m merging with next month.

What’s more, I’m throwing it wide open to say that any kind of frozen treat – ice cream, gelato, granita, lollies, semi-freddo, slushie, sorbet – goes!

Ice cream desserts are welcome too so if you fancy trying your hand at baked alaska, ice cream pie or an ice cream sandwich, this BSFIC is for you!

No restriction on style, ingredients or theme; whatever you want to make, if it’s a frozen treat, do please share it with BSFIC.

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Images of frozen treats from
Shutterstock

Posts published any time in September or October are welcome, but if they’re already up, please edit them to add the link and badge and send me the entry email.

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a suitable recipe any time in September or October. The deadline is October 28th.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • Include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge (below).
  • Email me (by the 28th of the October) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer) and the link to your post.
  • Please include in your email an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

I’ll post a round up of all the entries at the end of the month and I’ll also share your posts via Pinterest, Stumble and Twitter. If you tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC. I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on my Kavey Eats Facebook page.

IceCreamChallenge

For more ideas, check out my my Pinterest ice cream board and past BSFIC Entries board.

 

For August’s Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream, I joined forces with my blog sibling Dom at Belleau Kitchen for a BSFIC-Random Recipes Mashup. Instead of an ingredient or style theme, the challenge was to pick your recipe randomly and make whatever you picked. Not only was August a tricky month when it came to encouraging people to make frozen treats – the beautiful summer we’d been enjoying for the last few months fizzled out into a damp squib and it seems like half the country took their annual holidays too – I went away to Iceland for two weeks and wasn’t home to pull together my round up at the end of the month.

Of course, Dom has already shared the entries on his blog, but today it’s (finally) my turn! Apologies for the delay.

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Here are all the entries, in date order!

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I was quick off the mark this month, picking this White Chocolate Vanilla Ice Cream from Divine Heavenly Chocolate Recipes with a Heart, which I served with powdered raspberry to add colour and flavour.

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Next, Elizabeth made a fresh and delicious Strawberry Ice Cream from Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Ice Cream & Dessert Book.

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Dom picked randomly from a book called Desert Island Dishes and made a tasty Salted Caramel Custard Ice Cream.

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Jane was worried about what to make since finding out she’s diabetic, but was relieved when her random pick turned out to be a G&T Granita which she adapted to make a Gin Slush Puppy.

Chocolate ice cream mousse (500x416)

Corina’s recipe came from Michel Roux’ Eggs but as it was far too dense to churn, it didn’t quite work out as planned and she called the result a Chocolate Ice Cream Mousse.

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Alicia used the Eat Your Books membership she recently won from Kavey Eats to pick this Glace à l’abricot from Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking.

kate

Kate’s decided to choose her recipe from the set she has bookmarked from other food blogs, and picked No Churn Rhubarb Ice Cream from The Baking Beauties

hannah

Having settled into her new blog home, Hannah made Orange Souffle Glaces from the same Divine chocolate cookery book I used for my entry.

Chocolate Parfait

Choclette also used Eat Your Books to select this Chocolate Lavender Parfait from Green & Black’s Ultimate Chocolate Recipes: The New Collection.

Hot Chocolate Fudge Sundae

Karen turned to Delia Smith’s Summer Collection for this Hot Chocolate Fudge Sundae recipe, which she adapted to use milk chocolate instead of dark.

 

Thanks to everyone for joining in. I’ll post a new BSFIC challenge soon. In the meantime, head over to Dom’s for the next Random Recipes!

 

This month, Kavey Eats has joined forces with Belleau Kitchen for a Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream – Random Recipes mashup.

Which means that I had to follow instructions to randomly pick one of my cookery books and then randomly pick an ice cream (or sorbet, froyo or other frozen treat) recipe. Rather than trying to make a single pile of all my books so I could pick a book with my eyes closed, I asked Pete to grab a book at random (because, unlike me he, doesn’t know by heart the colours, fonts and titles of most of the collection).

The first two books didn’t have a single ice cream recipe to offer but third time lucky he picked Divine Heavenly Chocolate Recipes with a Heart by Linda Collister. The recipe we ended up with is definitely more to Pete’s taste than mine but that seems fair, since there’s still a little matcha ice cream and yuzu ice cream in the freezer, both of which are much more to my taste!

Although we followed the recipe ingredients as per the book, we changed the technique to use my new Optimum 9400 Blender by Froothie, which I mentioned in my recent Jungle Juice Sorbet post.

It’s a gorgeous, incredibly smooth and creamy ice cream with a really fantastic mouth feel but, as you can imagine, the white chocolate makes it rather sweet. I grabbed my pot of raspberry powder to give it a little fruity tartness plus instant visual bling. Perfect!

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Scroll down for recipe.

Making Custard in an Optimum 9400 Power Blender

I’d already seen custard made in a blender, when my friend Monica made some in her Vitamix. I was really impressed with the speed and simplicity, but put off by the Vitamix Pro 500’s £600 price tag. I had also been bowled over by the Thermomix I was loaned for a couple of months – it has a much wider range of functions including an internal weighing scale and cooking element but is twice the price of the Vitamix! Australian brand Froothie have recently launched in the UK and their Optimum 9400 blender is £329 – still a hefty price tag but significantly less than the alternatives.

In terms of performance, it compares well with Vitamix Pro 500 – the motor is 50% more powerful (2,238 watts against 1,492 watts) which powers the blade to 44,000 rpm against 37,000 rpm. Froothie don’t claim their product is superior – they simply provide a side by side comparison of key specifications. Because I’ve not owned a Vitamix I can’t offer a practical comparison. However, Helen from Fuss Free Flavours is a former die hard Vitamix fan who seems to have been converted after a few weeks playing with her Optimax 9400.

The reason power blenders such as Vitamix and Froothie’s Optimum 9400 are great for making custard is that you can throw all the ingredients in to the blender jug, switch on and gradually ramp up the speed to its highest setting. Simply leave the blender running for several minutes; the speed of the powerful blades generates enough heat to cook the custard. Believe me, after 7 minutes, our custard was steaming hot! And because we had confidence in the power of the blades, we dropped the solid pieces of white chocolate straight into the hot custard and blended again. The Optimum 9400 blades broke the chocolate down quickly and the heat melted and combined it thoroughly into the custard base.

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After that, we left the custard to cool down before churning it in our new Sage Smart Scoop ice cream machine – review coming soon.

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White Chocolate Vanilla Ice Cream, Served with Powdered Raspberry

Adapted from Divine Heavenly Chocolate Recipes with a Heart to use the power blender method of making custard

Ingredients
225 ml milk
225 ml double cream
4 large eggs
60 grams caster sugar
Vanilla beans scraped from 1 pod, or 1-2 teaspoons good quality vanilla bean paste
140 grams white chocolate, in pieces
Optional: Freeze-dried raspberry powder, to serve

Method

  • Place milk, cream, eggs, sugar and vanilla beans into a power blender. Switch on and increase speed to full, then leave running for 6-7 minutes. This will create a steaming hot cooked custard.
  • Carefully drop in the white chocolate and blend again briefly to melt and combine chocolate into the custard.
  • Leave custard to cool.
  • Once cool, churn in an ice cream machine until ready or transfer to freezer container and freeze until required.
  • To serve, a sprinkle of freeze-dried raspberry powder really lifts the white chocolate vanilla ice cream, visually and on the palate.

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This is my entry into August’s #BSFIC #RandomRecipes mashup co-hosted with Dom at Belleau Kitchen.

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Check out the challenge and join in!

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I used beans scraped from fresh vanilla pods provided by Panifolia, a retailer of high quality Mexican vanilla.
The freeze-dried natural powdered raspberries are from Sous Chef, a specialist online food and equipment retailer.

 

Kavey Eats received vanilla pods from Etienne Besse at Panifolia, freeze-dried raspberry powder from Sous Chef, a Heston Blumenthal Smart Scoop review machine from Sage Appliances and an Optimum 9400 blender from Froothie. Kavey Eats is a member of the Froothie brand ambassador programme, but under no obligation to share positive reviews. All opinions published on Kavey Eats are 100% honest feedback.

Special Offer: For an additional 2 years warranty free of charge on any Optimum appliance purchased, follow this link, choose your Optimum product and enter coupon code “Special Ambassador Offer” on checkout.

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There are many wonderful blog recipe events hosted by many wonderful blogs but one of the most fun and most successful is my friend Dominic’s Random Recipes, which he’s been running at Belleau Kitchen for the last few years. Setting a different theme each month, Dom’s event is all about encouraging us to pick up the forgotten books in our cookery book collections and be brave about trying something new.

This month, we’re joining forces to host a Belleau Kitchen-Kavey Eats challenge.

We want you to make a random recipe, from a random book – but it must also fit into Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream (which embraces sorbet, semi-freddo, gelato, frozen yoghurt and ice lollies as well).

I reckon the easiest way is probably to line up all your books and pick one at random. If it doesn’t have any ice cream (or other frozen treat) recipes, pick again. Then count how many suitable recipes the book contains, pick a number at random – I use random.org for this – and that’s your recipe.

BSFICMeetsRandomRecipes

How To Take Part In BSFIC Meets Random Recipes

  • Create and blog a recipe that fits the challenge by the 28th of this month.
  • In your post, please include a link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post and Belleau Kitchen’s Random Recipe post.
  • Include the BSFIC Meets Random Recipes badge (above).
  • Email me or email Dom (or better still, both of us) by the 28th of the month with your first name or nickname (as you prefer), the link to your post and an image for our roundup posts. (If you can resize to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side, I’d be grateful).

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

If you like, tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFICRandomRecipes. Dom and I will retweet any we see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on the Kavey Eats Facebook page.

Dom and I will both post a round up of all your entries after the challenge.

 

For July’s #BSFIC I asked you to take inspiration from holiday memories.

Here are the delicious ideas you came up with:

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Jo at Comfort Bites took inspiration for her grown up Coffee and Cinnamon Ice Cream from a holiday in Argentina.

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Kate, blogger behind What Kate Baked, considered lots of ideas before settling on this USA-inspired Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough No Churn Ice Cream.

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Sarah at The School of Balance created a Monkey Nut Dairy Free Vegan Ice Cream after a visit to the New York ice cream shop formerly known as Lula’s Sweet Apothecary.

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Stephen at All Things Speculaas has shared his wife Debbie’s Speculaas Ice Cream, based on the flavours of a biscuit traditionally enjoyed during the Christmas holidays.

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Corina at Searching For Spice remembered childhood holidays to Spain when creating her wonderfully vibrant Blackcurrant Frozen Yoghurt.

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Kate, the Gluten Free Alchemist, created these rather impressive Raspberry Ripple-White Chocolate Coconut Milk Ice-Cream Bars & Bites, thinking back to childhood summer holidays.

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My own entry was a Jungle Juice Sorbet inspired by a Jungle Juice Smoothie I encountered on safari holidays in Southern Africa.

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Amy, who writes Cooking, Cakes & Children, has made this beautiful Chocolate Caramel Ice Cream Roll in homage to memories of eating Arctic roll in the back garden during the summer holidays.

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Cheeky Dom at Belleau Kitchen didn’t make the Buffalo Milk Ice Cream he shared in his post about a very recent trip to Italy but he did enjoy it!

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Hannah, who’s just saying goodbye to the Corner Cottage Baker, harked back to childhood holidays with her grown up Boozy Ice Cream Floats.

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Shaheen, who writes A Seasonal Veg Table, made this bright Raw Vegan Raspberry Ice-Cream with vibrant Scottish raspberries.

Choclette, author of Chocolate Log Blog, remembered childhood visits to Switzerland when she made this Chocolate Sundae Royale.

 

A great round up, I hope you’ll agree.

August’s #BSFIC is joining forces with the Belleau Kitchen Random Recipes challenge – check it out and do join in!

Jul 212014
 

Safari

I love safari! Pete and I are fortunate to have been on several over the last two decades and have particular soft spots for the wildlife parks of Botswana, Kenya and South Africa, to name a few.

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There’s something utterly captivating about observing birds and animals in their natural habitats, up close and personal. Of course, there are the poster animals – sleek and powerful lions and leopards, lithe and speedy cheetahs, elegant-necked loping giraffes, portly hippos, grinning hyenas, wild dogs, buffalo, zebras, wildebeest – all of which are a delight to see.

But we find just as much joy in the smaller or lesser known wildlife – a family of silver-backed jackal pups playing in the dawn light under the watchful gaze of their parents, colourful lilac-breasted rollers or malachite kingfishers taking to the wing in a flash of colour, a fighting gaggle of vultures competing fiercely over the remnants of the latest unfortunate, a sniffling porcupine shuffling through the grass with quills-a-quivering, two bat-eared foxes cautiously poking their heads up from the entrance of their den, blinking bush-babies sitting high in a tree watching us watch them, a dung beetle laboriously rolling his ball of dung along the ground, the shimmer of sunlight against the iridescent plume of a glossy starling or ibis, the striking facial patterns and horns of the mighty oryx, the tight grip of a tiny reed frog clinging to a tall stem jutting out of the waters in the Okavango Delta… There is even excitement to be found in the footprints of animals long since departed, imprinted into the earth and now a challenge to our skills of identification – elephants and lions are much easier than the many ungulates!

Someone once declared that if you’d seen one wrinkly grey elephant’s arse you’d seen them all and he couldn’t see the point of going on more than one safari in one’s life. To say that I was flabbergasted is an understatement!

There are many ways to safari, from budget self-drive to remote luxury camps with private guides. We’ve done and loved both – each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Luxury safari camps are places of such beauty – gorgeous full height canvas tents with comfortable furniture, en-suite bathrooms and open air dining rooms where guests and guides come together for delicious meals. Of course, the focus is the wildlife viewing activities but we certainly enjoy the catering and accommodations in between!

Jungle Juice Memories

It was at one such safari camp that I was first offered Jungle Juice, a jolly name for a mixed fruit smoothie. Usually featuring a banana base with a range of additional fruits depending on what was available, this quickly became a favourite for me, especially as I’m not a wine or beer drinker. Indeed, when we later visited camps that didn’t offer anything similar, I was happy to describe Jungle Juice, and they would kindly rustle some up for me. (In the same way, I have introduced more African safari guides to shandy than I care to think about!)

Of course, as Jungle Juice is simply a mixed fruit no-dairy smoothie, it’s a drink many people make and enjoy.

Jungle Juice Sorbet

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Recently, I was sent an Optimum 9400 Blender by Australian brand Froothie. It’s a super powerful blender, with a very sharp blade which means that as well as making quick work of smoothies and sauces, it can also grind nuts and seeds and crush ice. The powerful motor even allows it to knead dough, and because the blade turns at 48,000 rpm it can generate enough heat to make piping hot soups as well. I’m yet to try these functions, and will report back as I do.

What I can tell you is that the motor and blade make quick work of chunks of frozen fruit and the advantage of blending them straight from frozen is that Jungle Juice becomes Jungle Juice Sorbet!

I make Jungle Juice Sorbet with nothing but fruit – no honey or sugar, no dairy, no oats – so it’s a very healthy alternative to dairy ice creams and sugar-laden sorbets.

For the first few moments, I thought the frozen chunks of banana, pineapple and mango I had thrown into the jug were simply too solid for the blade to handle but after a few tens of seconds more, the blade started to reduce the fruit to a thick cold paste. Pete used the tamper tool provided to push the chunks at the top down nearer the blades and a few minutes later, the sorbet was done.

Of course, you’ll want to eat the sorbet the moment it’s ready, so be prepared and have your bowls, spoons and eager diners ready and waiting.

As there is no added sugar or preservatives, this sorbet is best eaten fresh.

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Jungle Juice Sorbet

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
1-2 bananas, peeled, chopped and frozen
200-300 grams mixed fruits, peeled and chopped (if necessary) and frozen

Note: So that you can make smoothies and sorbets quickly whenever you feel like it, I recommend you keep chunks of frozen fruit ready to hand in your freezer. Banana is best frozen already peeled and chopped, likewise larger fruit such as pineapple and mango. Berries can simply be washed, hulled and frozen as they are. Make sure they’re fairly dry when you put them into the freezer, so the liquid doesn’t cause them to freeze into a solid block.

Method

  • Place your chosen fruit chunks straight from the freezer into your blender. (You’ll need a really robust blender to handle this. Alternatively, a high quality food processor will also work).
  • Blend until the fruit has been broken down into a thick, creamy puree. Pause once or twice to push solid chunks down closer to the blades if necessary.
  • Serve immediately.

This is my entry for July’s #BSFIC challenge – frozen treats inspired by Holiday Memories.

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Kavey Eats received an Optimum 9400 blender from Froothie. Kavey Eats is a member of the Froothie brand ambassador programme, but under no obligation to share positive reviews. All opinions published on Kavey Eats are 100% honest feedback.

Special Offer: For an additional 2 years warranty free of charge on any Optimum appliance purchased, follow this link, choose your Optimum product and enter coupon code “Special Ambassador Offer” on checkout.

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