It’s not often I visit Kingston-upon-Thames, being based as I am in the wilds of North London. But an invitation to enjoy Ribstock-winning barbeque in a pub not too far from my sister’s house in South London was too tempting to pass up, and on a gloriously sunny day in late March, we made our way down. We drove and parked in the public pay and display just opposite but if you want to take advantage of an impressive beer list and whisky collection, I’d recommend you travel by train to Kingston station, just a couple of minutes walk.

On our arrival, pub licensee Leigh White filled us in. The Grey Horse is now run by the team behind The White Hart Witley, where Sam Duffin installed BBQ Whisky Beer after moving it out of it’s original Marylebone home. The White Hart became well known for its extensive whisky bar, strong craft beer selection, live music and excellent barbeque. And when I say excellent barbeque, I’m not exaggerating – BBQ Whisky Beer won Ribstock 2013, beating the likes of barbeque stars Blue Boar Smokehouse, Carl Clarke of Rotary, Cattle Grid, Neil Rankin, Prairie Fire BBQ, Red Dog Saloon, Roti Chai Street Kitchen, The Rib Man and Tim Anderson of Nanban!

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The same team have now taken over The Grey Horse, which closed in 2014 and has since been extensively refurbished. When it reopened in November last year, the space had been reorganised to provide a traditional pub area to the front, a dining room with open kitchen behind and a live music venue called RamJam Club at the rear. RamJam has its own small kitchen too, so either the pub or guest chefs can cater separately for the club and small outside space.

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The new dining room opened this January and it’s a lovely space. A huge skylight lets in plenty of light, giving an upwards view out to blue sky, grey clouds or perhaps a starry night. Along one side of the room is an open kitchen and along the other a row of tables in a long alcove. At the back, exposed brickwork with a mural of Jimi Hendrix – he played here in the venue’s previous heyday, so it’s said. I’m not a fan of the high tables with stools that take up the central space; a killer for anyone with back or hip probblems – always smacks of style over substance, but that’s the only minus amongst the pluses for me.

The pub area is more traditional albeit with whisky-laden shelves (and board list) that make Pete determined to return without the car before too long!

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As I mentioned, the beer list is appealing. Pete has a half pint of Twickenham Tusk, on draft which he describes as dry with a pleasant floral hoppiness.

For the rest, we stick to soft drinks including a Dalston Cola and a Rocks Ginger and Wasabi. Both excellent and such a nice change from the big brand fizzies.

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We dither so much over which starters to order that we eventually decide on three!

First choice is crab cocktail, charred gem, fried avocado, nduja aioli (£7) and it’s plated in the deconstructed style that’s become so prevalent. Plenty of sweet fresh crabmeat, deliciously charred baby gem lettuces, odd but good-odd crumbed and fried slices of avocado and a generous smear or spicy nduja aioli. Can’t go wrong ordering this one!

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Next is the only meh dish of the meal – fried Ogleshield, pickled wild mushrooms and spinach puree (£6). Inside the deep-fried balls we expect to find gooey melted Ogleshield, a delicious sticky-soft washed-rind cheese by Neals Yard Dairy, but instead the filling is super dry, way too crumbly and lacking in much flavour. The spinach puree is more of a decoration than a key element – a shame as it tastes great. The big redeeming factor is the heap of pickled wild mushrooms which are redolent with red wine vinegariness and sweet shallots.

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Our third and final starter is chicken wings, hot sauce, blue cheese, sesame and celery (£6). Six plump chicken wings are covered in a fiery hot sauce – tingling-on-the-edge-of-burning rather than blow-your-head-off painful. The blue cheese dip is properly cheesy and thick enough to cling generously to dipped wings. The celery I leave for Pete, who praises it’s braised nature – gentle crunch and gentle flavour, nice with the blue cheese dip.

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For my main, how can I not choose Sam’s Ribstock winner, the Jacob’s Ladder beef rib? Available in small, medium or large (£10, £13, £16) I’m surprised at how hefty my £10 rib is and can’t help but laugh at a nearby diner’s look of shock when his large portion is served! Mesquite-smoked and rubbed with Sam’s own spices before being smothered in homemade barbeque sauce the meat is melty-soft inside with perfect char and texture on the surface; the flavour is smoky and beefy, intense and fantastic!

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It’s true, Ribstock totally called it, this barbeque is fantastic and absolutely worth the trek across town! Next time I come, I’m skipping the starters, good as two of them were, and going all in on the smoked ribs three ways (£20) featuring beef rib, pork rib and iberico rib!

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Pete is a sucker for a burger, so he chooses the classic burger (£9) which comes with smoked bacon and American cheese plus lettuce, onion, tomato, dill pickle, burger mayo and ghetto sauce (whatever that may be!) Skinny fries (£3) are extra, or you could order a coal roast sweet potato, dill aioli, black garlic (£4) or house pickles (£3) amongst other sides.

Just three days earlier, Pete and I tasted nine different beef patties (plus burgers made with each of those nine) to help our local pub decide on which to serve in their soon-to-be-upgraded burgers. Three stood out above the other six, of which one was a clear winner – on taste, juiciness and texture.

To Pete’s delight, the patty in this burger is the match of that winner; it has an intense beefiness to the flavour, excellent juiciness and a texture that gives just the right amount of chew without leaving one chewing and chewing like a cow eating cudd! The bun is well chosen, both for flavour and texture, and there is good balance of all the secondary ingredients and condiments.

All in all, this is a top burger!

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By this point, you’d be right in thinking we are quite full. But I always try to order one dessert just to assess a restaurant’s sweet offerings – too many restaurants treat desserts as an afterthought and they don’t always match up to the savoury menu.

I cannot look past the dark chocolate and peanut butter tart, salt caramel ice cream £6), which Pete won’t enjoy because of the peanut. So Pete goes for the cornflake ice cream sundae, dulce du leche and hot fudge sauce (£6).

The sundae first; a classic bowl of ice cream, cream and sauces with the extra crunch and flavour of cornflakes! It’s good and Pete somehow finishes the entire bowl!

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The tart is delicious too; peanut butter chocolate topping over crunchy base and with crushed caramel sprinkle, it’s super rich and fairly sweet – perfectly partnered with a properly salty salted caramel ice cream, which makes a pleasant and surprising change. I only manage half of this but I enjoy every mouthful!

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After all that we’re full to bursting but it’s definitely been worth the bloat – the food has been delicious, and the barbeque rib just phenomenal.

This isn’t our neck of the woods but we’ll definitely be back, as this is way more than just a decent local pub – for barbeque lovers it’s a destination restaurant, well worth the visit wherever you live.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of The Grey Horse.

The Grey Horse Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

 

Already well-established in Brixton and Shoreditch, chef-owner Robin Freeman’s Bukowski Grill has just opened its third branch in the heart of Soho. The latest location sits amid the trendy coffee shops, juice bars and restaurants along d’Arblay Street.

The menu is inpired by an American diner, with classic dishes such as burgers, ribs, chicken wings and sandwiches, all showcasing good quality British produce. During the week, a breakfast menu is also available, on the weekend that expands to a brunch offering.

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Decor is modern industrial (unfinished ceilings and floors, painted walls), and spacious – the chairs are far more comfortable than they look and tables are nicely spread out rather than on top of each other. There’s a view into the open kitchen a the back and the bar runs along one side of the room.

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The drinks menu is a good one; Pete enjoys a pint of Meantime’s Yakima Red on draft (£5 a pint) and I’m pretty sure that no other cocktail I try this year is going to top the frozen cherry bo (£6) from a very affordable cocktail list – bourbon, cherry and vanilla in a slushie format, this is utterly marvellous and I could happily while away a summer afternoon getting progressively happier on this!

The spiked milkshakes appeal too; dulce the leche and kahlua peanut butter or banana and bourbon or chocolate and rum (£5.95 each). That first one is on my list to try next time we visit.

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Our first starter is puck nuggets with kimchi remoulade (£5.95). To remove the guesswork for you, puck = pork and duck, though I imagine it’s also a play on the puck shape of these treats. Soft, soft pulled meat has been bound in a spicy sauce, then crumbed and deep-fried and is utterly delicious, with or without the accompanying dip. When I say spicy, I mean it, by the way. But then again, I’m a chilli wuss!

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We also enjoy a half rack of baby back pork ribs with spicy red onions and pickles (£6.15) which are again, very good. The classic barbeque marinade has a more gentle kick of heat than the puck nuggets, the meat is beautifully cooked – tender but not pappy – and the accompanying onions and pickled gherkin are spot on.

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Burgers are the draw here, so we go for two and share. The fat gringo (£9.95) includes a beef patty, Monterrey jack cheese, candied bacon, jalapeno mustard, red onions, tomato, lettuce and a smoked pickled gherkin. Like all of the burgers it’s served in a brioche bun, though you can switch bun for salad if you prefer.

The flavour combination is excellent, and the ratio of all the elements is just right – that jalapeno mustard against the sweet bacon is the big hit. It’s a bit of a shame to be asked whether we want the patty cooked medium or well done (we choose medium) and then have that ignored but since the patty remains juicy, it’s a minor disappointment.

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Burger number 2 is the bourbon bbq chicken (£6.95) which features grilled marinated free-range chicken breast, lettuce, tomatoes, mayo and a bourbon bbq sauce. I’m super impressed at how moist the chicken breast is; so often far too dry. The flavours are once again, excellent, and the brioche bun holds together well.

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Prices for burgers don’t include sides, which makes the price of the fat gringo a little steep; it comes in at £12.70 with a side of plain skinny fries.

We go for beef dripping potatoes (£3.50) and chilli cheese fries with sour cream and coriander (£4.95), both of which are great choices, if a little too much between two – if you’re having starters, one of these between two is plenty!

The beef dripping potatoes are essentially deep-fried roasties, and absolutely everything I’d ever want in a roast potato! Super texture, super flavour, all round magnificent!

The chilli con carne served on the fries has a classic chilli flavour and texture (not too sloppy, but not dry either) and is a great match with the fries – my main suggestion for improvement would be to serve the fries in a wider and shallower dish, allowing the topping to be spread across more of them. Add a small extra pot of sour cream too and these would be perfect.

Oh and I must give a shout out to the condiments, all home made. The pickles are super but so too is the homemade tomato ketchup on every table – sweet, a hint of chilli and delicious.

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Shared dessert is chocolate pot with rum raisin cream (£3.50), a well-sized pot of rich and tasty chocolate mousse topped generously with whipped cream and rum-soaked raisins. Lovely to have smaller desserts available for a sweet note after such a filling meal.

We both really like Bukowski Grill. The food is good, that’s certain. But I also like the space itself, welcoming without being achingly hipster, and friendly service too.

We’ll certainly be back – I want to try the buffalo cauliflower fritters, the smoked chicken wings, the swaledale lamb cutlets with smokey chilli jelly and the smokey beast burger – a beef patty topped with smoked pulled pork, smokey honey and a chipotle bbq sauce.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Bukowski Grill Soho.

Square Meal

 

Japanese consumers love limited editions so there was a lot of advertising and press interest when Burger King announced their Kuro (Black) Ninja burger in October. And this special edition was given its own mascot in the form of a cute cartoon ninja complete with black outfit and… a tongue stuck cheekily out! (No, I don’t know why, either…)

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I love BK Whoppers so when I learned that the Kuro Ninja was being launched during our recent holiday in Japan, I really wanted to seek it out.

On a day of eating that a hobbit would be proud of (during which we stopped for multiple breakfasts, multiple lunches and an enormous dinner), we finally tracked it down in Osaka.

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Most striking, of course, is the black bun, coloured with bamboo charcoal. It’s impressively black and with no discernible oddness of taste that we could detect.

Inside is a whopper patty, a round hash brown and a ridiculously long slab of thick bacon that lolls lewdly out from two sides. The regular lettuce, onions and sauce are complemented by Chaliapin sauce – this onion and garlic sauce is named for Russian opera singer Fyodor Ivanovich Chaliapin; during a visit to Tokyo in 1936, a steak and sauce dish was created for him by a hotel chef and has been named in his honour ever since.

Apparently, various of these elements have been seen before in some of Burger King’s earlier limited edition specials – the black bun also featured in 2012’s Kuro Burger, essentially a regular whopper but served with black ketchup (flavoured and coloured with garlic and squid ink); the bacon “tongue” was at the heart of Big Bacon Whopper, just a month or two before Kuro Ninja was available; and the Chaliapin sauce was a key component of the XT Steakhouse, a 2011 creation.

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What did we think? We liked it!

The balance of flavours and textures worked well enough. I found the hash brown made the burger a touch too big to eat easily; Pete had no such problem. The bacon tongue we folded inside, though that made the burger even bigger. Personally, I’d still choose a regular whopper over the Kuro Ninja… but I would really like to try the Kuro Whopper (no longer available) with its garlic and squid ink ketchup!

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Although the Kuro Ninja was advertised as ¥ 680 (burger only) / ¥ 830 (burger, fries and drink) the branch we went to in Osaka had increased the meal deal price to ¥ 1040 (about £7). But hey, we did get cute Kuro Ninja stickers for that too!

Read more of my Japan content, here.

Mar 222013
 

This gal has been wanting to visit Five Guys Burgers and Fries for donkey’s years.

Recently, I spent a few days Massachusetts for work. When the US team leader suggested we go there for our last lunch of the week  I nodded and grinned so enthusiastically I think I startled him!

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We grabbed a table, and a few little trays of peanuts – they’re complimentary and you help yourself from a huge bin just inside the door.

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Ordering was fast – I hardly had time to read the options before my turn at the counter came up.

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I chose a regular burger with pickle relish, pickles, mushrooms and grilled onions, the smallest portion offered of plain (rather than Cajun) fries and a regular soft drink. It came to just over $10 and I couldn’t finish it, though I enjoyed trying!

A nice touch is that all the toppings are included and you can choose as many of them as you like, right up to every single one, though I think that’d overload the burger so much it’d be impossible to eat!

Drinks are self-service from a machine. Your number is called when your food is ready to collect.

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As I expected, the burger was good. Very good. Really, very very good. Two meaty, juicy beef patties, generous portions of my chosen toppings and a sesame bun which just about held together to the end, though it was a close thing. A tasty, tasty burger!

Fries are served in cups but all of us found at least as many loose in the bags as in the (filled) cups. One or two cups between all five of us would have been plenty, though the rest were taken back for hungry colleagues at the office!

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Five Guys isn’t glamorous. Five Guys isn’t gourmet. Five Guys isn’t fancy.

It’s simple, greasy, comforting fast food done really well and I loved it!

 

Back in summer I shared my Pickleback Ice Lollies with the world. The reaction was mixed, with some readers horrified by the very idea but one of those who came down firmly on the “genius” side was Nicola Swift, Creative Food Director at The Ginger Pig.

To cut a fairly short story even shorter, we agreed on an exchange. I’d take in a bottle of (unfrozen) pickleback ice lolly and The Ginger Pig would help me create a custom burger mix for a burger to accompany the lollies. And they kindly offered to throw in a few other samples as well!

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At the Moxon Street branch, in Marylebone, one of the butchers showed me how to break down a side of beautifully aged beef into a variety of cuts.

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For my burger, I chose to combine chuck steak and fat, picanha and bone marrow.

I’ve come across picanha only through Brazilian steak restaurants, where it is a much prized cut. Not mentioned often here, the cut is called rump cap, also referred to as top sirloin or culotte in the US.

Beefy chuck was the main body of my burger mix, a cut that is affordable and good in flavour. Picanha is tender, juicy and gave more excellent flavour. Moistness in the finished burger was provided by the inclusion of bone marrow and added fat.

Once my cuts were finalised, the butcher passed them through the mincer twice to ensure they were not only properly minced but also well combined.

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With such a large volume of burger mince, I divided the mince into portions when I got home. We had the first burgers plain with freshly dug Yukon gold potatoes and butter. The flavour of the burgers was phenomenal! Moist and with just the right texture, they tasted absolutely fantastic!

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The next batch we had as burgers. For the buns, Pete used this trusty Tom Herbert recipe.

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Buns, pickled gherkins, raw red onion, fresh tomato and some mustard ketchup was all the beautiful patties needed.

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Fantastic burgers and definitely better than any single-cut burger mince we’ve used before.

Of course, the pickleback ice lolly I had afterwards hit the spot too, though Pete continues to insist they’re crazy rather than genius!

 

With thanks to The Ginger Pig for the custom burger mix and other samples.Hope you enjoyed the lollies, but am sure I got the best end of the swap!

 

One of the many great street food traders at Food Blogger Connect 2012 was Tongue N Cheek.

Usually at Eat Street, King’s Cross, owners Cristiano and Kirie Meneghin sell tasty food making use of underappreciated cuts of meat. As well as burgers and ox tongue rolls, the menu also includes Italian-inspired dishes, such as the ox cheeks with caramelised onions and polenta.

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As you can see, I was pretty darn pleased with myself when I got my hands on this Heartbreaker burger with pork belly, gorgonzola and other Tongue N Cheek condiments.

The patty is ox heart mixed with other well-aged cuts of beef to create an incredibly succulent texture and wonderfully rich beefy flavour. Even against the silky pork belly and pungent gorgonzola, this patty held it’s own.

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It’s a fabulous burger, and what’s more, it’s not trying to recreate what anyone else is doing. It forges its own utterly tasty path.

 

Dave aka Cork Gourmet Guy is a friend of mine and he’s also a bloody good chef. So when he announced his Burger Breakout popup, it went straight into the diary.

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It was hosted at 06 St Chad’s Place, a stunning space that was once a train repair shed and has been transformed by the architectural group that own it. It was a great venue from the customer point of view but I know that very limited kitchen space and, more importantly, cold storage, made it difficult for Dave and his kitchen helpers.

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Dave had designed 5 burgers, all priced at £11 including a side portion of chips. Deep fried pickles, burger slaw and extra chips could also be ordered.

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Perhaps a little overexcited by the arrival of summer, after so many months of rain, I ordered an entire (enormous) pitcher of Pimm’s for myself. Various beers were available at the bar, and the normal range of other stuff.

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Pete and I shared two burgers, the first of which was named The Bambi Bought It. Served in Dave’s choice of sourdough bun (for stability), this was a juicy Cornish venison patty with beetroot pickle, Cornish brie and Dave’s rather special quince & chocolate BBQ sauce. The sauce was thick, like Marmite, or perhaps closer to tar, and very intense, but worked superbly against the sweet sharp pickle and creamy cheese. The chips were a little over salted for me, but still excellent.

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Our second burger was The Whiskey Beast. (Dave used Jim Beam, I think, so yes, whiskey with an “e”. Plus he’s Irish, so you know, fair play!) This one, also in the sourdough bun, contained a dry aged Cornish beef patty, smoked bacon, Cornish blue cheese and Dave’s whiskey mustard. Perfectly cooked beef, a good balance of condiments and that sweet sharp kicker of mustard sauce, with just the faintest hint of whiskey, this was also a bloody good burger!

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The burger slaw didn’t work for me – too much mustard and not enough crunch. But the deep fried deli pickle in dill batter more than made up for it, served piping hot, these were intensely juicy and sharp with the lovely crisp coating of batter. I’d have preferred smaller pieces, to get slightly more batter to pickle, but they were superb as was.

 

Meat and fish were provided by Cornish Grill, suppliers of Cornish produce to London restaurants. They’ve also hosted a series of popups themselves over the last few months.

 

To keep up to date with further Burger Breakout dates, follow Dave on twitter or subscribe to his blog.

 

I’ve been thinking about this question recently, not least because I was sent two different burgers to review, and I was also asked what my ultimate burger would be by Donald Russell.

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Broadly, there are three aspects to a burger – the meat patty, the bun and the various condiments served inside or with it.

The Patty

This is a contentious one, especially with my friends across the pond, many of whom insist that any patty that contains more than minced beef and seasoning is a not a burger at all, and might better be described as a flattened meatball!

I’ll have to agree to disagree as I happily enjoy both pure-beef burger patties as well as ones with all kinds of other ingredients mixed in. Since I eat the latter in burger baps, with burger condiments they are, as far as I’m concerned, burgers!

Pure Beef Patties

If I want a pure beef patty, then I don’t see the point of buying mince just to add salt, pepper and shape it myself, and I’m certainly too lazy to buy a steak and mince it myself, so we usually get ready-made patties from Waitrose – their Aberdeen Angus ones to be specific. These are pretty good and we’d not thought much about alternatives, until recently.

The Donald Russell patties we were sent didn’t measure up well against the Waitrose Aberdeen Angus ones. Cooked to medium in our normal way, they were chewy, a touch dry and under-seasoned. We were disappointed with them.

A few weeks previously, we were also sent some Waitrose Heston Ultimate Beef Burgers to review. I was dubious because, at the end of the day, they were still made of beef, so how much better (if at all) could they possibly be, really?

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I read the blurb. It informed me that Heston has created a blend of three different cuts of (British) beef which, minced especially to ensure that the meat’s grain sits vertically within the burger. The cuts used are chuck and brisket, finely minced, plus 28 day aged fore rib, minced less finely to add texture. Plus seasoning and that’s it. The burgers are based on the recipe Heston developed for his In Search Of Perfection TV show.

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To my surprise, we absolutely loved Heston’s Ultimate burgers. The flavour and texture were exceptionally good and they retained moisture very well. We thought they were significantly better than any other pure-beef patty we’ve tried; in fact we liked them so much that, despite the price tag of £4.49 for 2 burgers (weighing 125 grams each), we’ve bought them twice since and will continue to buy them regularly for as long as they’re available. (Note, because they don’t shrink like cheaper burgers, we’ve found one burger in a bun each to be sufficient for a satisfying meal).

Recipe Patties

It seems that there are as many recipes for burger patties, the kind containing more than just beef, as there are burger eaters. OK, this is probably an exaggeration but only a slight one!

In the past, we’ve enjoyed Pete’s mum’s recipe which combines minced beef, raw onions, pork sausage meat and seasoning. And we’ve made cheese burgers with the cheese inside rather than on top; blue cheese is my choice for this. We’ve also been inspired by Nigel Slater to add East Asian ingredients to flavour beef, pork and chicken patties and even to cook them in a bath of stock, in the oven.

But the recipe I’m recommending for my ultimate burger is a Felicity Cloake one, part of her “How To Cook The Perfect…” series (which earned Felicity one of two well-deserved awards from the Guild of Food Writers this year). (See below for recipe).

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We particularly loved the flavours and moistness added by the stout and the lightly caramelised onions. These were seriously good burgers!

By the way, we used some Donald Russell mince for these patties, which we were sent at the same time as the burgers, and thought it had a decent fat content and flavour, so worked well for making burgers.

The Bun

I am torn between the brioche bun (which adds a lovely hint of sweetness and also looks spiffing) and a regular white burger bap.

What is definite is that it must be soft, soft, soft.

I hate burger buns with a crust and using ciabatta (or any other trendy loaf) is a no-no.

But nor must it be so soft that it disintegrates while eating the burger, leaving soggy smears of bun remnants and a virtually bare burger between your fingers!

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As Pete isn’t a fan of brioche, we opted for white and our favourite baker, Tom Herbert, came to the rescue and emailed over his ultimate burger bap recipe. It produces the perfect white burger buns – soft, with a lovely crumb and yet robust enough to remain in one piece while eating. (See below for recipe).

The Condiments

This one’s a bit of a free for all as there are many condiments people like in their burgers from a variety of pickles and relishes to cheese (American processed or real) to rashers of bacon, fried onions, fried mushrooms, onion rings and then there’s the question of sauces and salad…

In our ultimate burgers, we both went for romaine lettuce (picked fresh from the garden), thinly sliced red onion and some of my home-made pickled gherkins. In addition, Pete added thinly sliced tomato and I added sliced, fried mushrooms and a basic marie rose sauce (tomato ketchup + mayonnaise mixed).

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On a cheaper burger, I might add stronger flavours such as bacon, chilli con carne, cheese or pesto but on a great burger, much less in the way of condiments are necessary, I think.

Felicity Cloake’s Perfect Burger

12 patties

Ingredients
1 tablespoon oil or butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
1kg roughly minced chuck steak (or any non-lean mince)
100 ml stout
2 tablespoons brown breadcrumbs
2 teaspoons chopped herbs (parsley or thyme work well)
1 teaspoon salt
Black pepper

Note: we used Meantime London Stout, white breadcrumbs and fresh thyme.

  • Heat the oil in a frying pan over a low heat, and cook the onion until soft and slightly browned. Leave to cool.

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  • Spread the beef out and sprinkle over the onion. Add the stout, breadcrumbs, herbs and seasoning and mix together with a fork, being careful not to overwork it.

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  • Divide the meat into 12 flattish burgers, putting a dimple in the centre of each. Cover and refrigerate for an hour.

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  • Cook the burgers on a medium to hot barbecue or griddle pan: leave them undisturbed for the first 3 minutes so they build up a good seal on the bottom, then carefully turn them over, adding a slice of cheese on top if desired. Cook for a further 4 minutes for rare, and 7 for well done, and allow to rest for a few minutes before serving.

Tom Herbert’s Ultimate Burger Bap

Makes 10 baps

Ingredients
500g strong white flour
200ml milk (tepid)
100ml water (tepid)
25g castor sugar
25g lard
25g sourdough (omit if necessary)
10g salt
5g dried yeast (or 10g fresh yeast)
Egg, beaten (optional, for wash)
Sesame seeds (optional)

  • Weigh all the ingredients into a bowl and mix thoroughly.
  • Knead for 10 minutes until your dough is soft and elastic.
  • Leave to rise in a covered bowl for an hour in a warm place.
  • Divide the dough into 10 pieces and pin out 10cm baps on a floured surface.
  • Place on a baking trays with baking paper on.
  • Brush some beaten egg over each bap.
  • Leave them in a warm place for half an hour.
  • Brush with a second coat of beaten egg.
  • Sprinkle a pinch of sesame seeds onto each bap.
  • Leave for a further half hour to rise.
  • Meanwhile pre heat your oven too 230 degrees Celsius.
  • Bake your baps until they are perfectly golden (about 10-15mins).

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Note: We omitted the sesame seeds and egg wash. We were still rewarded with beautifully risen, evenly textured white baps that were pillowy soft but didn’t disintegrate whilst eating our burgers.

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