Interviews with restaurateurs, food writers, fellow bloggers, food and drink producers and others.

 

For the second of my new Monday Meet The Blogger series, I talk to Miss South, one half of the sibling duo behind North South Food.

nsf_header-v3

Hello and welcome, please introduce yourself and tell us a little about the kind of content you share.

I’m Miss South, one half of North/South Food. (Mister North is the other half and he’s my big brother). We set the blog up in 2010 to allow us to talk to each other about our love of food and how it was different in our two parts of the world. He’s in the North (West Yorkshire) and I’m in south London (Brixton) and we thought it would be interesting to see how who two people who grew up together cook in our different worlds now.

Is there a story behind your blog’s name?

We tried to think of all kinds of clever puns and then realised that simple was best. Plus it abbreviates nicely…

blog banner

What are your earliest memories of cooking? Who / what inspired you to cook?

My parents cooked and my granny was a traditional Irish farmer’s wife who baked brilliantly. I grew up around food and was encouraged to be interested in it, so promptly rebelled and at the age of 19 could barely make toast. I lived on dry cereal and instant noodles. I developed gallbladder issues (genuinely not connected to my terrible diet!) and became very ill. From my sickbed on the sofa, I was forced to watch Ainsley Harriott turning his way through Ready Steady Cook and realised I could either let him annoy me or get up and learn something. So oddly enough, I owe it all to Ainsley Harriott. Not sure many bloggers can say that.

What are the biggest influences on your cooking at the moment?

I’m actually getting MORE obsessed by my slow cooker. I thought I’d have reached peak slow cooker when I finished my book Slow Cooked in March, but no. I’m constantly adapting recipes and trying to create fresh deep flavours in there. I’ve also been combining this with loads of lovely salads in the recent hot weather.

Tell us the story of your most spectacular kitchen failure!

I will let you into a little secret. I have kitchen disasters quite often. I think the worst recent one was when I misread a slow cooker recipe and added 4 teaspoons of baking powder to a pudding. I ended up with 3 and a half LITRES of rubbery salty steamed pudding that tasted metallic and soggy. I was cooking for someone I’d never met before and while their mouth said ‘it’s not that bad’, their eyes said ‘they asked you to write a cookbook’? I then re-made the recipe and it was fantastic. Unfortunately only I ate it though.

Which food or ingredients could you not live without?

I am an umami obsessive. I can’t do without savoury things like parmesan, anchovies, miso and tomatoes. I also worship at the shrine of butter. Margarine is like a swear word to me. And you will pry my potatoes from my cold dead hands.

Which food writers / chefs do you find most inspirational and in the same spirit, are there any particular cookery books you cherish above the rest of the shelf?

I have always been Team Nigella. I went straight from Ready Steady Cook to her columns in Vogue in the 90s. The first few ‘proper’ recipes I cooked were from those. I bought myself How To Eat and it was my first ever cookbook and still the one I use the most. I had a collection of recipes from early in my cooking career clipped from magazines, family members etc. and it got lost in a house move 10 years ago. I still miss it and now clip obsessively into Evernote instead.

Most of my food influences are women. I don’t know if that’s coincidence. I adore Lindsay Bareham and cooked so much stuff from her Evening Standard columns when I first moved to London in the early 2000s. My family swears by Marcella Hazan. I would trust Claudia Roden with my life. I’m loving Sally Butcher’s books and I’m obsessed by Diana Henry and Bee Wilson’s writing at the moment (books from both are by my bed currently.) I particularly enjoy reading cookbooks at night. Gives me interesting dreams.

If I were coming for dinner, what would you cook for me?

Honestly I have no idea. But I would never have cooked it before. I have a slightly stressful habit of cooking new and complicated dishes for people who come round for dinner, usually something I have no idea how to cook and basically winging it. I’m surprised people come back. If I was sensible, I’d just roast a chicken…

Image 1

If we were meeting for a meal out, which restaurant would you choose?

It would probably have to be in Brixton Village if I were in author/tourist guide mode after writing Recipes from Brixton Village. I particularly like Okan for okonomiyaki or El Rancho De Lalo for hearty Colombian.

However if I was relaxing and money was no object, it would be the Hawksmoor or somewhere serving mountains of seafood.

If we were to take a trip together, where would we go?

In fantasy land I’d either like to go to Japan (and you’d make a great tour guide) or the Deep South. In reality, I suffer from agoraphobia and the thought of travelling really doesn’t do it for me. This is why London suits me so well. One can feel like you’ve gone places without having to travel.

Maybe I’d take you to my home city of Belfast though and feed you an Ulster Fry. You could travel the world off one of those.

ulsterfry

Since you started blogging, has your style and content changed over time, and if so, in what ways?

Sometimes I find it hard to believe how much my style has changed since I started blogging. It’s much tighter and more concise. I find it much easier to sit down and write than when I first started. I blog for different publications now and practise makes it much easier. I also started out blogging my attempts to learn to cook and early posts featured me being hesitant, making mistakes and not blogging my own recipes. My confidence and skills in the kitchen has increased so much I find it hard to believe I’m the same person!

What is the hardest aspect of blogging for you?

Definitely the photography. I just don’t find it very interesting and I’m also not very good at it. I can spend longer trying to get a decent photo of certain things than cooking them. Mister North however is a supremely talented photographer (he shot the images for Slow Cooked in fact) and if I could, I’d get him to take them all.

What inspires you to keep blogging regularly?

Quite simply I really really enjoy it. I love to write and the blog allows me to do that. I also enjoy the structure it gives my week. Having something to come up gives me focus and interest. I’ve found since going to once a week posting on a Sunday, the routine works well and I don’t have to think about it as mud, it just falls into place.

lentil_option-1-foodforthought

What are you absolutely loving cooking, eating, doing right now?

As I said earlier, as long as I have my slow cooker, I’m a happy bunny. I’m playing around with cooking offal and off cuts in it especially at the moment. I’m also enjoying baking. It must be the GBBO effect. I’m determined to finally master pastry. I loved writing both Recipes from Brixton Village and Slow Cooked but having done well over 350 recipes between the two books, I am enjoying being able to cook in a leisurely fashion right now!

What’s the single most popular post on your blog?

The two most popular blog posts are the ones where I talked about my experiences of living on benefits and the issues around food poverty from the perspective of someone who understands why it isn’t as simple as buying 10kg bags of rice and lentils. Food for Thought won me a Young British Foodies Award last year and A Letter to Jamie Oliver went properly viral last summer, leading to the blog being featured on the Food Programme on Radio 4.

Can we give a little extra love and attention to a post you love but didn’t catch the attention of your readers in the way you hoped?

I think I’ll let the readers just dip in and out as they fancy it. I’d feel weird picking a post of my own, but Mister North’s experiences of making black pudding with fresh blood is worth a read…

northernstars_pigbits-201

What’s the one question you wish I’d asked you but didn’t?

Not probably a question you’d have asked, but I think it makes sense to explain. We blog under pseudonyms because it was easier to start with and now it’s become my persona so I keep it separate to my day to day ‘me’. That’s why there’s no ‘real name’ or photo.

 

Spread the love

Blog URL: http://northsouthfood.com
Twitter handle @northsouthfood
Pinterest profile: http://www.pinterest.com/northsouthfood/
Instagram handle: http://instagram.com/northsouthfood/

 

I’m an avid blog reader. That may seem an obvious thing to say as a blogger myself but I know many bloggers who rarely read more than a handful of other blogs, and few outside their circle of friendship. I regularly read a few hundred blogs – easy to do with an RSS reader – and I also read individual posts from several hundred more, most of which I stumble across via various social media platforms. There are so many really great blogs out there; an astounding number actually. I’d really like to share some of my old and new favourites with you.

Today, I’m starting a new series in which I approach bloggers I admire and ask them to tell us a little more about themselves and their site.

bigspud-header

Hello and welcome, plea­se introduce yourself and tell us a little about the kind of content you share.

Hello! I’m Gary and I’ve been writing Big Spud since 2007. I keep it as a record of things I’ve cooked and enjoyed, but continually amazed that other people want to read it. I have a focus on potato recipes, but genuinely interested in all foods and cuisines. I use Jamie Oliver and Heston Blumenthal as inspiration for a lot of my cooking, and it ranges from the everyday to the flashy.

Is there a story behind your blog’s name?

I had the nickname Spud as a boy, and when my son came along he inherited it. I can’t be Spud any more so I’m now the Big Spud! I’ve been using the name online for years.

DSC05531

What are your earliest memories of cooking and who inspired you to cook?

I always hung around the kitchen on a Sunday helping Mum with the roast. But it wasn’t until I left home and had to fend for myself that I really picked up the wooden spoon.

What are the biggest influences on your cooking at the moment?

I love all cuisines and especially Italian-influenced food. But another food blogger MiMi of meemalee.com has just released a book all about Asian noodle dishes and I’m cooking a lot of those lately!

Tell us the story of your most spectacular kitchen failure!

I had an annual tradition of making cheese straws on Christmas Eve growing up. I preheated the oven and carried on making my pastry. 20 minutes or so later, once I’d rolled and cut out my straw shapes, I opened the oven to find the Christmas Day turkey sat there in its carrier bag where Mum had left it to defrost. The plastic had emblazoned the bird with the Tesco logo! Still tasted OK the next day though.

It was less funny when I did exactly the same thing the next year…

Which food or ingredients could you not live without?

Salt and pepper may be an obvious choice but I must have Maldon salt. The flavour is irreplaceable.

Which food writers / chefs do you find most inspirational and in the same spirit, are there any particular cookery books you cherish above the rest of the shelf?

I adore the gung-ho can-do spirit of Jamie Oliver. Everything he makes looks achievable, delicious and fun – and it usually is. Whatever you think of the person, his cooking is excellent. At the other end of the scale Heston Blumenthal strives to make every meal the most exceptional it can be. By focusing on each detail you end up with a dinner very much the sum of his parts. His recipes are rarely simple, but the results are always worth it.

I try to capture a little of both personalities in all the cooking I do.

If I were coming for dinner, what would you cook for me?

I would have to make you a roast chicken with roast potatoes and other trimmings. It’s a bit of a signature.

 

What’s the single piece of equipment you wouldn’t be without?

A couple of my best Heston Tojiro knives. Easily my best friends in the kitchen.

What’s your kitchen white elephant?

I try to be fairly ruthless, but I have some beautiful Chinese porcelain spoons that I mean to use every week but I’ve probably used three times in about ten years.

 

What is the hardest aspect of blogging for you?

My photography is awful. I want to snap and eat straight away, I don’t have time to prep a stage for the photo. A decent camera + lenses would help. But that’s another expense I don’t need!

What inspires you to keep blogging regularly?

Seeing how people react. I only ever set out to write this blog for myself, but I love getting Tweets, Facebook comments or blog comments discussing the latest post.

I only write when I have something to say. And because I’m cooking every day, more often than not something comes up.

 

What are you absolutely loving cooking, eating, doing right now?

Stir fry noodle dishes are a staple right now – with MiMi’s book for inspiration we’re tearing through them in our household. So much variety!

What’s the single most popular post on your blog?

It’s a no-brainer: perfect roast potatoes. It was the culmination of a loooot of research and it’s also a popular question: how do you make perfect roast potatoes? When Christmas Eve rolls around this post goes nuclear.

Can we give a little extra love and attention to a post you love but didn’t catch the attention of your readers in the way you hoped?

Heston’s fish pie, influenced in part by his famous Sounds of the Sea Fat Duck dish, can be a notoriously difficult and time-consuming dish to pull off. I spent a lot of time thinking about the recipe and reimagining it as a simplified salmon dish that captures the essence of it. It didn’t really get much attention at all relative to the thought I put into it. In hindsight it probably only clicks with people who’ve tried the Heston fish pie and would be grateful for the short-cuts!

 

Spread the love

Blog URL: http://bigspud.co.uk
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thebigspud
Twitter handle: http://twitter.com/bigspud
Pinterest profile: http://www.pinterest.com/thebigspud/
Instagram handle: http://instagram.com/TheBigSpud

 

An affordable recipe perfect for alfresco dining, making use of British ingredients.

That’s what I was asked to create when vouchercodes.co.uk invited me to film another recipe video with them. (For my first, I shared the recipe for my mum’s tandoori roast lamb, an alternative suggestion for Christmas dinner.)

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-4

This time, I made a frittata, opting for a combination of chorizo, spinach, onion & potato.

I’m calling this a frittata but it’s probably more accurate to say it’s a combination of an Italian frittata and tortilla Espanola. From the Spanish tortilla I’ve taken the combination of eggs, potatoes and onions and from the Italian frittata, the addition of meats, cheeses and vegetables.

The dish is very versatile – it can be served hot, warm or cold, works for brunch, lunch or dinner, stores well in the fridge and is easy to transport. That makes it perfect for picnics or alfresco dining in the back garden.

It’s wonderfully easy to adapt this recipe by switching out the chorizo and spinach. In place of chorizo, try cubed pancetta or bacon, or for a vegetarian option, goat’s cheese is fabulous stirred in or scattered over the top just before grilling. Instead of spinach, use peas (I use frozen petit pois) or long stem broccoli, parboiled ahead of being added to the pan.

You might also take inspiration from kookoo, a Persian version in which eggs are loaded with lots and lots of chopped mixed fresh green herbs. Mint, basil, dill, parsley – all would work well here.

Chorizo, Spinach, Onion & Potato Frittata Recipe

Serves 4 as a main or 6-8 as part of a wider selection

Ingredients
3-4 tablespoons vegetable oil
100 grams British cooking chorizo, diced (0.5 cm)
400 grams white onions, thinly sliced
350 grams large floury potatoes, peeled and diced (1 cm)
100 grams baby spinach leaves, washed
6 large free range eggs, beaten, with salt and pepper

Method

  • Add 3 tablespoons of oil to the pan.
  • Cook the diced chorizo in the oil for 4-5 minutes over a medium heat.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-5

  • Remove the chorizo with a slatted spoon, leaving the coloured oil in the pan.
  • Add the sliced onions, stir to coat in the oil and spread evenly across the pan. Cover and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-1

  • Add the diced potato, stir to mix into the onions and oil. Cover and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. If the pan looks dry at any point, add a few teaspoons of water. The potatoes should be cooked through.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-4

  • Uncover the pan and turn up the heat a little. Fry for a couple of minutes, to give the potatoes a touch of colour.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-2

  • Add the spinach leaves and stir until wilted – this doesn’t take long.
  • Make sure the ingredients are evenly distributed, drizzle a another teaspoon or two of oil around the outside edges of the pan and then pour in the eggs.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-3

  • Preheat the grill on a medium setting.
  • Cook the frittata for about 5 minutes, drawing the edges in a little until the base sets.
  • To check whether it’s set, use a spatula to lift up the edges and shake the pan to check whether the frittata will come loose.
  • Transfer the pan to the grill and cook for 2-3 minutes, to cook and colour the top of the frittata.
  • Place a large plate over the pan and turn over plate and pan together, to remove the frittata from the pan.
  • Use a second plate to turn the frittata right side up, if you prefer.
  • Serve in slices, hot, warm or cold.

Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-1 Chorizo-Spinach-Onion-Potato-Frittata-KFavelle-KaveyEats-VouchercodesUK-2

Thanks to vouchercodes.co.uk for inviting me to create this recipe video, and Tall Order Films for doing such a great job of filming and editing. Kavey Eats received a fee for creating this content.

 

Call myself a foodie* and never been to the home of the pork pie? Shame on me!

Luckily, an invitation to attend the Artisan Cheese Fair in Melton Mowbray gave me the chance to fix this oversight and Pete and I made our way North on the first Saturday in May.

Held in the Cattle Market, which itself is in the heart of this ancient market town, the Artisan Cheese Fair is now in its fourth year and bigger and better than ever. We spoke to organiser Matthew O’Callaghan about how he came to create the event.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXF4NIsHvgM&feature=share&list=UUKdQswQXJXh8KiDjuikxOPg

Unlike other cheese festivals we’ve attended, entrance is just £1 and there are no hidden costs to worry about. Free on site car parking is available and the various talks and musical entertainment don’t require additional payment.

The majority of the stalls were given over to cheese, as you’d expect, though of course, the famous local pork pie was represented by a couple of producers, as was locally produced beer. There were also a few non-cheese stalls selling fudge, cakes, bread and other bakery goods, a variety of alcoholic and soft drinks, ice cream, jam and samosas (though, surprisingly, no paneer-filled ones!)

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5536 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5535
Hunt Cake and Pork Pies at Dickinson & Morris aka Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe – I can recommend both!

As Matthew said, over 50 British cheese makers were represented, most of them showcasing multiple cheeses. We spent a few hours at the Fair so I was able to sample at least one cheese from nearly all of them. Here are my top picks.

Kavey’s Favourites From The 2014 Artisan Cheese Fair

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5507 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5505

Quickes Oak Smoked Cheddar & Goat Cheddar

Smoked with oak chips from their own woodland and made with milk from their own dairy, the Quickes oak smoked cheddar had a beautifully natural smoke flavour which was perfectly balanced with the cheese itself – in so many smoked cheeses, the only flavour is the smoke itself. The texture of the cheese was lovely with a pleasing creaminess from the fat content and I liked the level of salty sharpness.

The Goat Cheddar was also fantastic, indeed it’s one of three cheeses I purchased to bring home.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5515 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5514

Cote Hill Blue

Mary Davenport’s family have been dairy farmers in Lincolnshire for 40 years, but turned to making cheese 9 years ago when the falling price of milk made running the business solely as a dairy less viable.

I loved Cote Hill’s soft mild blue cheese made in particular; though the cheese is mild, the blue flavour comes through clearly and the rind is lovely. The Cote Hill Reserve was also delicious – a semi-hard washed-rind cheese which uses Tom Wood Beers’ Bomber County to add flavour to the rind.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5516

Cheesemakers of Canterbury’s Canterbury Cobble

This stand had a wider range of cheeses on display than most exhibitors, as well as butter and biscuits. It was their Canterbury Cobble that appealed the most. Cheesemaker Jane Bowyer explained that it is made like a brie but then matured into a hard cheese. It was creamy but sharp, with a lovely hint of lemony citrus.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5520 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5521

Belvoir Ridge Rutland Slipcote

Jane and Alan Hewson from Belvoir Ridge Creamery were showcasing a new soft curd cheese called Colwick, having recently revived an old 17th century recipe. It was perfectly pleasant but it was the oozing Rutland Slipcote that stole my attention, and was another cheese I purchased to bring home. Slipcote is a white mould-ripened cheese and is delightfully pungent and gooey when ripe. The Hewsons make their cheeses with milk from their rare breed Red Poll & Blue Albion cattle.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5525 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5524

Hafod Welsh Organic Cheddar

As she cut me a sample, Rachel Holden explained that her father Patrick (who was busy cutting and wrapping cheese) looks after the family dairy while she and brother Sam make cheese. The milk from their brown and white Ayshire cows produces a creamy nutty cheddar with a distinct brassica flavour. It’s the kind of cheese you could accidentally eat far too much of!

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5540 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5538 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5539

Thimble Little Anne & Dorothy

I confess I ended up spending ages chatting to cheese maker Paul Thomas and his wife Hannah Roche. The couple have been in the cheese industry for many years and Paul is also the head cheese maker for Lyburn Farmhouse Cheesemakers. Their own cheese making business is in its first year and currently has just two adorable little cheeses called Little Anne and Dorothy. Little Anne is a fresh lactic cheese and Dorothy is a soft washed-rind cheese; both are made from unpasteurised raw cow’s milk.

Paul also teaches cheese making classes at the The School of Artisan Food.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5541

Hampshire Cheeses Tunworth

I almost didn’t stop at the HC stall, as I’m already so familiar with Tunworth – it’s a cheese a buy nearly every time I visit Neal’s Yard Dairy. But I saw a window of opportunity when the stall was miraculously free of fellow visitors and took the chance to chat with cheese maker Stacey Hedges.

Of course, the Tunworth was delicious as always, but I was particularly excited by Stacey’s news that they started making a new cheese last year. Called Winslade, the new cheese is wrapped in a band of spruce bark, which adds flavour to the rind. It’s currently produced in limited volume, but she told me to look out for it in Neal’s Yard Dairy.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5542 Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5544

Whitelake’s Goddess

I didn’t mean to make cheese maker Peter Humphries blush when I asked if one of his cheeses was named for someone in particular but his embarrassed expression as he said “yes” was utterly charming. As too was his cheese. It was the oozing yellow centre making a break for it that drew me to the stall – the cheese is (commercially) known as Goddess and is produced (for musician-cum-cheeseman Alex James). Made from Guernsey milk, this is a delicious mild and creamy soft cheese.

Ticklemore Harbourne Blue (no photo)

Ticklemore had three cheeses on sale – Devon Blue (made from cow’s milk), Beenliegh Blue (made from sheep’s milk) and Harbourne Blue (made from goat’s milk). The Devon was a bit plain and the Beenliegh too acidic but the Harbourne Blue was a wonderfully tasty cheese. The balance between sweet, salty and blue was delicious and the rich full fat creaminess was a real delight. This was another of the cheeses I bought to bring home.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5503

Sparkenhoe Red Leicester

I wasn’t able to chat to anyone at this busy stall as they were busy selling cheese but did taste both their hand made Red Leicester and a mild and chalky blue cheese.

 

Talks & Entertainment

Luckily, we learned a lot about the history of Red Leicester (and exactly how anatto came to be used to give it that distinctive bright colour) by attending one of the free talks, An Unusual History of Cheese. In this entertaining and hugely informative talk, Matthew O’Callaghan shared a light-hearted history of cheese that was perfectly pitched to convey lots of information in a very engaging way. His abiding love for cheese itself and for local and national history was self evident!

Outside, visitors were entertained by the Melstrum Ukulele Band and the New St Georges Morris Dancers.

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5519

I was drawn to a recreation of an old milking parlour, set up in an open-sided trailer.

 

The Melton Cheeseboard

Artisan-Cheese-Fair-Melton-Mowbray-KFavelle-KaveyEats-2014-5531

A special thank you to Tim Brown of The Melton Cheeseboard, a local shop specialising in a wide range of British cheeses and local specialities, for his very warm welcome and the generous selection of cheeses and local products he gave us. His shop is located in the heart of Melton Mowbray at 8 Windsor Street and is open 6 days a week.

 

* Actually, I’m more likely to refer to myself as a greedy glutton than a foodie, but you catch my drift…

Kavey Eats was a guest of the Artisan Cheese Fair. Thanks to Matthew, Lin, Rachel and Tim.

Nov 272013
 

Twenty one and a half years ago, Pete and I started dating. A few months later, I went down to Beckenham to meet my future in-laws. Of course, I had no reason to be, but I was pretty nervous all the same. Not only was I meeting his parents but three of his siblings and two of their offspring too. *gulp*

Baby Sam was about 6 weeks old. I remember how pleased I was when this tiny crying bundle calmed down and stopped crying as soon as I took him into my arms. That felt like a welcome, right there! Of course, the entire family was enormously welcoming and it was a lovely day. But the person who calmed me down the most was little Rosie. She was a two year old whirlwind of excitement and affection and from the first time we met, we were firm friends.

KaveyRosie1994 (1 of 1)

Here she is (with me) a couple of years later, at our wedding. That’s the date she and Sam (and a few months later, their younger sister Jennifer) officially became my nieces and nephews and I have loved being Aunty Kavey ever since.

Rosie has always been an active partner in keeping the relationship close, sending us cards and letters and calling on the phone. As soon as she was old enough, she came to stay with us for the weekend every few months. At first, Rosie’s mum Kate (Pete’s middle sister) would come with her on the train to Waterloo, I’d meet them at the platform for a handover and Rosie and I would hop onto the tube to our place. As she got older, she’d do the train journey on her own, mum dropping her off at one end and me meeting her off the train at the other.

We spent the weekends cooking together at home; eating out, introducing her to some of our favourite foods; talking about books all three of us had enjoyed reading – she’s a bookworm, like us, and loves science-fiction too; taking her clothes shopping, which was such a pleasure because she’s the complete opposite to the “me me me I want I want” generation.

I think she was about 13 when we took her to Paris. She’s a warm, friendly girl but rather shy, so I pushed her just a tiny bit into using her basic French skills to order her meals and ask for a carafe of water, in restaurants. I can still remember her genuine pride and delight when she did so, and the restaurant staff nodding in understanding and smiling encouragement.

These days, we share a fondness for trawling through charity shops, giggling at some of the outfits she tries on in her hunt for potential LARPing costumes and congratulating each other on our fabulous bargains.

She’s very clever too, did I mention that? All grown up now, she studied at Imperial College London for her bachelors degree in Biology and went on to do a Masters of Science in Ecological Applications. She’s also kind, generous, friendly, loyal and cares for the world around her.

The reason I’m telling you about my lovely niece is that Thorntons approached me recently with an offer I couldn’t refuse. They asked if I’d like to send a gift box of chocolates to someone who deserved them. Did I know someone who needed cheering up and spoiling? Well, yes I did, actually.

These last two years have been hard for Rosie. Last year, after a period of remission, her mum’s cancer came back and this time it was terminal. Rosie moved back home to help and spend time with her mum and younger sister. It wasn’t an easy few months. Kate wanted to die at home, so a bed was set up in the living room; she used the time to put everything in order, to organise her funeral, to sort out her will and decide what would happen to her various animals. This time was bittersweet too – we visited every week that Kate remained with us and enjoyed some of the best conversations we’d ever had, full of reminiscence and laughter and frankness and occasional seriousness. How unfair to lose her at the peak of her life! The months after losing Kate were difficult for everyone, her three children most of all, of course.

Rosie’s had a lot of other tough things to deal with too, since then. I won’t talk about them here, because you don’t need to know. What I do want to do is send a message to Rosie and let her know that everything will turn out OK, she will land on her feet and she will have a good and happy life, even though things feel like a struggle at the moment.

Rosie, my lovely niece, I hope this little parcel from Thortons put a smile on your face. I love you and I’m so proud of you. Chin up!

 

With thanks to Thortons for inviting me to take part in their Christmas Hero campaign.

Here’s a snap Rosie sent me of the goodies she was sent.

RosieThorntonsChristmasHero

 

Back in June I spent a lovely weekend attending the Oxford Food Symposium, held in St Catherine’s College, Oxford. It’s very remiss of me not to share the experience here on the blog, as I had a wonderful time attending delightfully diverse lectures, meeting fellow delegates and appreciating the excellent catering. But I made few notes and took no photographs, so it’s unlikely to make it onto the blog…

One of the best things about the weekend was making new friends. Diana and I discovered we had a huge amount in common: not only our interest in food, which was a given for all those attending the symposium, but our style of eating and cooking and much about how we view life and choose to live it.

Diana'sKumquatMarmalade-140808

When we meet again in London, the week after the symposium, we exchange home made preserves. I am very taken by the beautiful hand-printed card Diane has slipped inside the cellophane around her kumquat marmalade.

I ask her to explain the design. She tells me about a well known proverb in Chinese that goes, “eating a small amount of something increases the enjoyment of its taste”. Diana adapted this to create her own motto, “knowing how to eat increases the enjoyment of tasty food”. When she talks about it, it’s clear how well it encapsulates her passion for food and the way that learning more about the history, traditions, techniques and recipes of the world enhances her enjoyment of food.

Chinese Seal

As for the stamp itself, that’s another lovely story: During the years she and husband Tack lived in Brussels (where they met), the Imperial Palace Museum of Beijing was invited to show an exhibition of cultural items at the Belgian Royal Museums for Art and History, which lasted for 6 months. One of the staff accompanying the exhibition from China was a master in traditional seal carving. Tack persuaded the master to take him on as a student and attended lessons with him every day until he, and the exhibition, returned to China. In the years since then, Tack has designed and carved many beautiful seals including this stunning one for Diana.

During some of our many rambling chats at the symposium, Diana mentioned how she loved the idea of sharing some of her own recipes and cooking tips but didn’t want to start a blog of her own. So I cheekily asked if she’d be interested in being a guest writer for Kavey Eats.

Tomorrow’s post is her first contribution and I hope there will be many more. Please take a moment to leave an encouraging comment for her and if you give her stir fry recipe a go, let us know how you get on!

 

A few weeks ago I was asked to film a video recipe for Vouchercodes.co.uk. They were looking for alternative ideas and twists for the Christmas day dinner. I made my mum Mamta’s Tandoori Leg of Lamb, which can be served with all the normal roast dinner trimmings, as we do in our house, or as the central dish to an Indian feast.

TandooriLegLamb2

My video recipe is now live on their site, as are other delicious ideas from fellow bloggers. Check them out too!

Here’s the shorter edit that Vouchercodes.co.uk are sharing. I have a longer version that I’ll share with you soon.

Mamta’s Tandoori Leg of Lamb

Ingredients
Leg of lamb, approximately 2 kg
2 medium onions, peeled and roughly chopped
4-5 cloves of garlic, peeled and 2 halved
1.5 inch piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
2 tablespoons besan (gram) flour (leave out if not available)
1 tablespoon coriander powder
A few strands of saffron, soaked in a tablespoon of warm water
3-4 bay leaves
1 inch stick of cinnamon
3-4 cardamoms
6-7 black pepper corns
5-6 cloves
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1-2 teaspoons chilli powder
2 tablespoons good quality oil
Juice of 1 lemon or lime
1 small carton of creamy, natural yoghurt
Salt to taste

Note: You can replace the bay leaves, cinnamon, cardamoms, black pepper corns and cloves with 1 tablespoon of good quality garam masala. Home made is best, as cheap ready made ones are bulked out with other, cheaper spices.

Method

  1. Make slits in the leg of lamb, insert a few halved cloves of garlic into a few of the slits, and set lamb aside.
  2. Optional: Grind the whole spices (see Hints & Tips).
  3. Place all ingredients except yoghurt into a blender and blitz until smooth.
  4. Transfer paste to a bowl, add yoghurt and mix well.
  5. Taste and adjust spices. Remember that the spice paste has to give enough flavour to 2 kg of meat, so it has to taste a little over-salted and over-spiced at this stage.
  6. Spread the spice paste over the lamb, ensuring that some is worked into the slits.
  7. Leave to marinade at least overnight. For best results, 24 to 36 hours.
  8. Place on a baking tray and cover with aluminium foil.
  9. Cook at 375 F, 190C for 1 1/2 hours for pink meat (or 2 hours for well-done meat).
  10. Baste from time to time and leave uncovered for last half hour, so that the spices and meat turn brown.

Hints & Tips

Ingredients

  • Make sure you use full fat yoghurt for this recipe as low fat yoghurt often splits when heat is applied. Thick Greek-style yoghurt works well.
  • If using frozen lamb, defrost thoroughly and drain resulting liquids before applying marinade.
  • Instead of buying tiny jars of spices from the supermarket, it’s more economical to buy in slightly larger quantities from Asian grocery shops. However, spices fade over time, so if you don’t use them up quickly, they’ll lose their intensity of flavour. I’d recommend storing a small amount of each one in easy-to-access spice jars, keeping the rest in your freezer and replenishing as and when you need to.
  • Fresh ingredients such as ginger, coriander and other key ingredients for Indian cooking are also often cheaper in Asian and other ethnic grocery shops. If you don’t have an Indian or Pakistani shop near you, look in stores specialising in Chinese or Caribbean food, as there are many cross-over ingredients.

Tips

  • If your food processor or blender is not very powerful, grind the whole spices in a spice or coffee grinder first, before combining them with the other ingredients. If you have a powerful food processor or blender, add the whole spices with the other ingredients and grind in one step.

Alternatives

  • You can use this marinade recipe on any meat or fish from larger joints or whole chickens, to smaller cuts such as lamb shanks or individual portions of chicken. It also works well on whole fish, though will need far less marinating time.

Serve with

  • We love this tandoori roast lamb with traditional British trimmings – roast potatoes and parsnips, carrot and swede mash, savoy cabbage and gravy. We serve it with either a mint raita or mint jelly. For Christmas, we add chipolatas and stuffing and brussel sprouts for my sister who adores them…
  • Of course, the lamb leg also works as the centrepiece for an extravagant Indian feast. I recommend my favourites such as chicken curry, stuffed aubergines, an additional vegetable dish such as cauliflower and potatoes, a daal or red kidney bean curry, some chapatis and rice on the side. To start, maybe pakoras or samosas and afterwards, a vermicelli kheer, similar to rice pudding but made with vermicelli pasta. Recipes for these dishes can be found on my mum’s site, Mamta’s Kitchen.

Leftovers

  • Use leftovers just as you would with those from a plain lamb roast – make shepherd’s pie, lamb hot pot, a simple lamb curry, lamb and potato cakes or enjoy it sliced cold in sandwiches or wraps, with some of the minted cucumber and onion raita.

TandooriLegLamb1

The introductory segment was filmed right at the end and it was after 11 pm by then, so I’m blaming my odd bounciness in that bit on my tiredness, but the rest is not as cringe-worthy as I feared! In fact, although I’ve long felt I have a face for radio, I’m really happy with it! Really hoping I can work with Voucher Codes on more of these in the future.

Nov 062012
 

Tools For Self Reliance Cymru collect old and unwanted hand tools, mostly those used by gardeners, and their volunteers clean, repair and sharpen them. They send their refurbished tool kits to grass roots community groups in Africa.

As they explain, "Tools mean work, and the chance to shape their future, just as important to a young person in Tanzania or Ghana today as it is in Britain."

Abergavenny-2003

In addition to sending tools to Africa, TFSR Cymru also buy tools and items made by blacksmiths in Africa, those they have supported in the past, and bring them back to the UK for sale.

TSFR Cymru also sell a large number of tools that they receive for refurbishment but which are not required by their African partners, either because they are easily made locally or are not needed there. These tools are also cleaned and sharpened, fitted with new handles where necessary and often have much more character than modern tools.

Abergavenny-2004

We encountered TSFR Cymru at this year’s Abergavenny Food Festival when their box of rakes, hoes, cultivators, dibbers caught our eye. When we saw how reasonable the prices were, Pete could not resist purchasing a cultivator, which shall be put to good work in the garden and allotment in coming months.

There were also some smaller gardening and other tools available which would be ideal for gardeners, or as gifts for gardening friends.

Abergavenny-2005

Tools For Self Reliance Cymru are an independent registered charity based in Crickhowell in South Wales, and they collect tools from across Wales.

For those outside Wales, if you have friends and family closer to TFSR Cymru  or are planning a holiday, do look at whether you are able to contribute any old and unwanted tools for them to refurbish. TSFR Cymru have four groups in Wales as well as a network of collectors who also help them gather suitable tools.

 

(There is also a separate UK Tools for Self Reliance organisation which does similar work and may have centres near you).

 

With thanks to Abergavenny Food Festival for press passes to attend the festival.

 

In a recent post, I shared our cooking class with chef Lee Groves, during a seafood holiday to Cornwall.

Lee has kindly given this interview for Kavey Eats, and shares his recipe for Ray Wings in a Pepper Butter Sauce, below.

LeeSeafoodClasses(c)-0898

Can you give us a little potted bio of chef Lee Groves? How did you get into cooking? What path has your career taken? How did you get to where you are now? And I remember you telling me that your 2010 Masterchef experience was hugely important to you because it came at a time when you were reevaluating where you were at and where you wanted to be. Can you tell us more about the experience itself and how it shaped what came next?

I always wanted to be a chef, i remember telling a friend at infants school!

I never sat on my Gran’s knee podding peas, or fly fished with my Grandfather, no one else in my family is in the trade, just something I always wanted to do. After 2 years at college, my first job cooking(age 17) was in the local pub, at which I had been working on the bar. But, I knew scampi, gammon and frozen lasagne wasn’t me! Then I was lucky enough to land a job at The Walnut Tree, Abergavenny, under the highly acclaimed Franco Taruschio, one of the hardest things I have ever done, but it was my building block. Three years later, after stints at Gidleigh Park and Gary Rhodes, I returned to Wales. It didn’t last long and at the age of 23 I landed my first Head Chef job in a busy seaside pub just outside Exeter, (I say landed, blagged morelike!).

After a couple of years, a new restaurant was looking for a Head Chef, in the same area…my first proper role in high end fine dining. Even though the accolades came in very soon, the restaurant wasn’t making enough money. That took me to Oxford, where I gained lots of recognition within prestigious guides, it was here I won my first Chef of the Year competition, and then I got the bug. After many competitions, and winning, I knew for definite the sky was the limit.

A few years later, and more accolades later, I found myself out of work, temping here and there was o.k., I wasn’t sure if I actually wanted to continue cheffing and nearly left the industry, but I wanted to get my teeth into something. Then I watched Masterchef 2009, The Professionals, and thought to myself I can do that! So applied online, not knowing what to expect……Then the call came, I had been chosen for the last 36 to be filmed, (out of 10,000), and thought oh! here we go!

4 months later, after alot of blood, sweat, tears and overnight travelling, the fire was back! And I wanted to be better than ever.

Having found Scott & Julia on an advertising website, they were looking for a head chef in St. Ives, the rest as they say is history. After only being open for 18 months now we have won many accoldes and taken St. Ives by storm.

What is your cooking ethos and style?

My cooking ethos is use fresh, don’t accept rubbish ingredients, and half the battle is won. Alot of chefs mask the main ingredients with many sauces and flavours, yes be creative but have confidence in what you are using.

What’s your favourite comfort food or meal?

My favourite comfort food/meal, can vary, from a Fray Bentos pie, to a lovely roast dinner with all the trimmings, fish and chips or a good hot homemade curry.

And what would you cook for a special occasional meal, at home not in the restaurant?

At home I tend to experiment, but for a special meal, it would have to be game, in season, (can’t wait for my first Grouse next week, and the first Partridge in a couple of months time), or a piece of fresh Seabass.

I loved everything you showed us during our cookery classes. But as you know, I was particularly blown away by the ray wings in a pepper and brown butter sauce. Could you give me your recipe and any tips and tricks to achieve the best results?

There isn’t an exact recipe, it’s all about feeling and understanding the ingredients, flame control is very important too, as you don’t want that lovely buttery sauce to split.

So pan fry the freshest ray wing in hot olive oil, season, it should be golden brown, so about 4 minutes either side, add a spoonful of capers or soft mixed peppercorns, reduce the heat, add a good slug of balsamic vinegar, add 3 or 4 nuts of cold unsalted butter, and gently stir in and around the fish to form a glossy piquant dressing, the fish should still be slightly pink on the bone so it peels off into the lovely, meaty strands.

LeeSeafoodClassesc-0943_thumb LeeSeafoodClassesc-0967_thumb
LeeSeafoodClassesc-0968_thumb LeeSeafoodClassesc-0971_thumb

 

Our visit to Cornwall was part of a week-long South West Tour courtesy of The Food Travel Company (and Riverford Organic Farms). They are a new company offering specialist trips for food (and drink) lovers, with group departures and customised itineraries available.

 

A while ago, I was sent the beautiful book Modern Flavours of Arabia by Suzanne Husseini.

Born in Kuwait to Palestinian parents, Suzanne’s family emigrated to Canada when she was just 4, and started a new life there. Suzanne’s mother continued to create the Arabic dishes of the Middle East, and although Suzanne learned many other cuisines, it was Arabic cuisine she loved most strongly and which she has shared in her first book.

The book is filled with Suzanne’s versions of a range of traditional recipes, plus modern dishes with an Arabic twist. She conjures up the Middle East kitchen with ingredients that have, thankfully, become much easier for global cooks to find in their local shops – cardamom and rose, pistachios and dates, chickpeas and bulgur and many more.

She kindly gave me the interview below to share with my readers.

modernflavoursarabia

 

Firstly, congratulations on your beautiful book and thank you for giving this interview to Kavey Eats.

My pleasure.

You explain in your introduction that your family emigrated to Canada when you were very young. Where did you emigrate from and do you have any memories of your birth country from before the move? Were there things you and your family particularly missed (other than people)?

My parents were living in Kuwait at the time when we emigrated to Canada. My parents are both of Palestinian origin. My parents decided to start a new life in a new country with 4 small children. I was the eldest. I know my young mother was barely 24. Of course this move was very exciting for us as children but it was most challenging for my mother. She left family, friends, and special memories. We arrived around Christmas time in Canada . The cold and snow was quite a novelty for us but it made my mother even more homesick for the warm surroundings she grew up in.

She always mentioned how much she missed certain fresh ingredients, typical Middle eastern supplies and after tasting many fruits declared that they were ‘tasteless’. She made the best of this situation and reconnected us with our roots by cooking the most amazing meals that always brought us comfort and joy on the coldest of days.

You mention that you found a way to make friends with curious classmates through the exotic (for them) foods that your mother made for your lunch box, and when they visited your home. Was it that easy, or was the food a way to open the avenues of communication, in contrast to some of the harder and crueller experiences of being an immigrant?

When I was taking my strange sandwiches to school I was about 7 years old. I think the fact that I was so young and innocent and really didn’t see what all the fuss was about…. So when they teased me about my food choices and made fun of my heritage it didn’t affect me as much as it would of if I was older where you become truly sensitive to cruel remarks. I overcame all that by inviting my class mates to my home often and bringing foods like Falafel to school to share with them.

As a child , I didn’t realize or was aware how powerful the act of feeding people can be. It did indeed open the channels of communication for me. My classmates accepted me and my differences and understood this very profound message. Food is love. I have always and still do take every opportunity to seek understanding by feeding my friends. It is the perfect recipe to forge new friendships and promote peace, love and understanding one plate at a time.

My parents came to the UK from India before I was born. Mum certainly cooked lots of wonderful Indian food during our childhood, but also learned to make British classics, as well as international dishes from China, Greece, Italy, France… Did you have a similarly multi-faceted exposure to food, or did your mum tend to stick more closely to the cuisine of her home? Did you always embrace Arabian cuisine, or did you find yourself drawn to it more as you got older?

My mother made her own Arabic/Pitta bread from scratch. She made Falafel when people still didn’t know what it is. She would shop for the freshest fruits in season to make her own jam. Homemade yoghurt was a staple in our home. She delighted us with homemade traditional Arabic desserts. She drew from her memory and made mostly Arabic inspired meals that she knew best. I fell in love with Arabic cuisine from day one. As I got older , I experimented with other foods but always was drawn to the familiar flavors of the Mediterranean and I would find that in Italian, Greek and Southern French Food particularly.

Many immigrant families will be familiar with the challenge of recreating traditional dishes without access to all the usual ingredients. How did your mum cope with this issue? Were there many recipes she had to adapt during your childhood?

If she couldn’t find it she would improvise and make her own version of a dish and make it as close to the original as possible. I think her godsend was discovering Italian and Indian supermarkets that would carry herbs like basil, coriander and spices. She would make a trip to the farmer’s markets that were frequented by the Italian community and find vegetables like tomatoes, lemons, parsley in abundance.

Of course there were items that she just couldn’t find and she would rely on new friends traveling back to the Middle East to bring her some unique supplies.

Are there any tips you have for readers who might find it difficult to find some of the specialist ingredients?

Really the ingredients that I have used throughout my book are easily found in anyone’s supermarket. Now that Middle Eastern Grocers are common it’s not hard to find the once considered exotic ingredients like Tahini, Pomegranate Molasses, Zaatar, Sumac, and Grape vine leaves.

Many items can be substituted like spinach instead of swiss chard for instance or if purslane is difficult then watercress is a good choice.

I notice that both your father and yourself describe yourself as Arabian rather than from a specific country? Is this because you don’t really identify with one country in particular, or because you prefer to rise above the divisions and differences of nationality in favour of wider cultural and regional similarities?

My parents are both very proud of their Palestinian heritage which is a part of the larger Arabian picture. When you refer to yourself as ‘Arabian’ means you share a language, a culture, the hospitality, a history, a story that is common to all people of Arabic origin regardless which country they come from. The divisions are only on the map. We grew up in a household where my family showed us how to be proud of our Arabic heritage and celebrate it. We also grew up loving everyone regardless of their differences be it religion, color, or nationality. I will always be thankful for parents who instilled in their children such values.

I am proud to say that my dining table is not only laden with food but is always graced by the presence of dear colorful friends from all corners of the world.

You explain that your recipes are not intended to be a “historical account of Arabic cooking” but a collection of recipes you grew up with, influenced by what you’ve learned during your years of cooking and teaching since. How close are the recipes in Modern Flavours of Arabia to what one might find in the kitchens of the Eastern Mediterranean, North Africa and the Middle East? Would you describe them as fairly traditional or more of a personal and modern interpretation of Arabic food?

All of my recipes are certainly Arabic in one way or another. I have all the traditional dishes that have become common to all like Hummus, Tabbouli, Baba Ghanouje which are not my personal creations. But I do add a little of this and a dab of that. I re introduce a traditional that’s been made one way forever and give it a makeover. In my modern interpretations I do try to maintain the integrity of the dish. My aim is to respect it , be authentic and only change something if I feel it is complimentary. So as you must know by now , I’m not a fan of fusion food where you bring two opposing food cultures to collide to create or distort a dish for sake of being ‘new’.

My food represents mostly the flavors of the Eastern Mediterranean as it is the most varied and by shear history and geography has evolved into one of the most amazing cuisines of the world. That also includes North Africa, the Gulf and the neighboring countries of the Middle East who naturally influenced this diverse and sophisticated food culture.

Was it hard to narrow down the recipes in your repertoire to the number you needed for the book or did you know instinctively which ones must be included?

I had many more recipes to share but my publisher at the time advised me to cut back so the book wouldn’t be too big. So I had to make the difficult choice of deciding which ones would make the cut for the time being. I am cooking up a second book now and a lot of those recipes will make make an appearance.

Were there recipes you chose not to include because your audience might not appreciate them, or because they might struggle to find the ingredients?

Not at all, all the recipes are accessible and have been tested on many good friends who love to eat them and with their encouragement I decided to include them. When I’m cooking , I go through the same process as everyone else. I go to shop for my ingredients and get inspired to cook that way. I don’t have any secret location where I buy certain thing. It’s all home cook friendly.

Which is your favourite recipe in the book, either because you love the dish, or have a personal memory associated with it?

I love all of the recipes which is why they all made it to be part of my book. The cover photo depicts my Arugula Salad with Roasted Aubergines and a Sweet and Sour Pomegranate Dressing. That is one of my favorites… The peppery Arugula leaves are complimented by the sweet buttery aubergine, the bite of the onions and the delightful crunch of the pine nuts. The pomegranate dressing pulls it all together.

What is next for you? Another book, or another project? Can you tell us about it?

As I mentioned earlier I am working on a new book with a collection of new recipes.

I am working on a new special TV cooking show highlighting the beautiful Arabian cuisine that I adore.

I have begun my cooking classes again to keen students wanting to unlock the mysteries of Middle Eastern cuisine.

This summer my ‘modern flavors of Arabia’ will be launched in Canada and the US. I am very excited to be on tour cooking , signing books and sharing my food and stories with everyone.

 

SumacEggsRosti-0248
Sumac Eggs with Potato Rosti, cooked from Suzanne’s recipe

 

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Modern Flavours of Arabia.

© 2006 - 2014 Kavita Favelle Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha