Luiz Hara aka The London Foodie was one of the first fellow bloggers I met shortly after launching Kavey Eats in spring 2009. I can no longer remember how we met but I do know that we built a friendship on that most important of bases – food!

Born in Brazil to Brazilian-Japanese parents, Luiz moved to London at the age of 19, fully intending to return to Brazil once his studies were completed. But fate intervened, he met his partner and settled down in the UK instead. His family background gives him an amazing range of cuisines to draw from in his cooking. I went to some of his earliest Japanese supperclubs which were a delight, and also loved his Cooking Club, during which each guest took a turn to cook a dish to the evening’s theme, creating a multi-course extravaganza.

I remember when Luiz decided to leave behind the world of finance and dedicate himself wholeheartedly to food, kicking off with a diploma course at the Cordon Bleu cooking school and including a stint learning more about traditional Japanese cooking in Tokyo.

His supperclub has continued apace to become one of London’s best; places are highly sought after and sell out within moments of going on sale. Although the food is predominantly home-style Japanese, Luiz regularly adds touches of South American influence, not to mention techniques from classic French cuisine, providing a feast of dishes you would be hard-pushed to find anywhere else in London.


The good news is that his first cookbook, Nikkei Cuisine: Japanese Food the South American Way, shares many of the recipes he has developed and perfected over the last few years.

In Luiz’ own words:

At its simplest, Nikkei cuisine is the cooking of the Japanese diaspora. When my family and millions of other Japanese people migrated to South America at the start of the 20th century, they recreated their native cuisine using local ingredients. This style of Japanese cooking is known today as Nikkei Cuisine. For historical reasons, Nikkei cuisine is mostly associated with Peru and Brazil (where I was born).

The book is his personal collection of over 100 recipes and includes family favourites and contributions from Japanese and Nikkei chefs he met during research trips, as well as the many recipes Luiz has developed himself.

Recipes are divided into chapters for Small Eats; Sushi, Tiraditos & Ceviches (a chapter which really brings home the parallels between the South American and Japanese approach to raw fish); Rice & Noodles; Soups & Hotpots; Mains; Vegetables, Salads and Tofu and Desserts. There is also a chapter on mastering the basics of Sauces, Marinades & Condiments.

Photographs are colourful and appealing, with handy step-by-step illustrations for trickier techniques such as Japanese rolled omelette and Maki (sushi) rolls.

The good news is that I have two copies of Nikkei to give away. Scroll down for the chance to win this beautiful book.

In the meantime, enjoy Luiz’ delicious recipe for Nikkei Sea Bream with Yuzu & Green Jalapeño Rice.

Seabream 1

Nikkei Sea Bream with Yuzu & Green Jalapeño Rice

Tai gohan (sea-bream rice) is a classic of Japanese home cooking and is a dish I have always loved. It can be made in a rice cooker or in a clay pot or elegant pan to be served at the table for added wow. The fish is cooked over the rice, imparting a delicious flavour to the dish. Here I give my Nikkei interpretation, by adding a dressing of olive oil, yuzu juice and jalapeño green chillies, mixed into the rice just before serving. It’s like traditional Japan embracing the spice of South America.

Cooked in a Clay Pot

Serves 8–10

600g (1lb 5oz/2 ¾ cups) short-grain white rice
550ml (19fl oz/2 ½ cups) dashi (Japanese fish and seaweed stock) or water
100ml (3.fl oz/ ½ cup) mirin
100ml (3.fl oz/ ½ cup) light soy sauce
2.5cm (1in) piece of root ginger, peeled and cut into fine julienne strips
4 sea bream fillets, scaled and pin-boned
a sprinkle of sansho pepper
For the yuzu & green jalapeño dressing
1 green jalapeño chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
4 tbsp finely chopped spring onions (scallions)
4 tbsp yuzu juice
4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil


  • Wash the rice in a bowl with plenty of fresh water using a circular motion with your hand.
  • Drain the water and repeat this rinsing three or four times until the water runs clear. Let the rice drain in a colander for at least 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, prepare the soaking and cooking broth. Combine the dashi or water, mirin and light soy sauce and set aside. Soak the drained rice in the cooking broth in a clay pot or a rice cooker (see below) for 30 minutes.
  • Rice cooker method: After the soaking and before cooking, scatter half of the ginger strips over the rice, lay the sea bream fillets on top and turn the rice cooker on. It should take about 15–20 minutes to cook. Once the rice cooker’s alarm beeps indicating that the rice is cooked, let the rice rest for at least 15 minutes before opening the rice cooker.
  • Clay pot method: Tightly wrap a tea-towel (dish towel) over the lid of a Japanese clay pot (known as donabe) or if you do not have one you can use a heavy casserole pan (Dutch oven). After the soaking and before cooking, scatter half of the ginger strips over the rice, lay the sea bream fillets on the top (I like to arrange the fillets to look like an open flower), place the lid on top and bring to the boil. Once boiling, bring the temperature down to the lowest setting and cook for 15 minutes. Turn off the heat, and without opening the lid (don’t open the lid at any stage of the cooking process), rest for a further 15 minutes.
  • Up to this stage, this rice is a traditional Japanese tai gohan or Japanese sea bream rice and can be served as it is – it will taste delicious. But for added va-va-voom, I like serving this with a yuzu and green jalapeño dressing, which I pour over the fish and rice just before serving. To make the dressing just put all the ingredients in a bowl and mix together well.
  • Take the unopened clay pot to the table, open it in front of your guests and, if desired, carefully remove the skin of the fish. Pour the dressing over the fish and rice then using a wide wooden spoon, fluff the rice well, breaking the fish into tiny pieces and mixing it together with the dressing into the rice. Mix thoroughly. If you are using a rice cooker, follow all the above steps but do not take the rice cooker to the table! Make all the necessary preparations and serve the rice in individual bowls at the table.
  • To serve, place the rice in individual rice bowls, top with the remaining julienned ginger in the centre of each bowl followed by a sprinkle of sansho pepper and serve immediately.

Seabream 2

Recipe and images extracted from Nikkei Cuisine: Japanese Food the South American Way by Luiz Hara. Photography by Lisa Linder. Published by Jacqui Small (£25).


Jacqui Small are offering a copy of Nikkei Cuisine: Japanese Food the South American Way by Luiz Hara to two lucky readers of Kavey Eats! The prize includes free delivery within the UK.


You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
Leave a comment telling me about your favourite Japanese or South American dish.

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow @Kavey on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win a copy of Nikkei Cuisine: Japanese Food the South American Way from Kavey Eats! #KaveyEatsNikkei
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle at the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

Rules, Terms & Conditions

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 4th December 2015.
  • The winner will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • Each (of two) prizes is a copy of Nikkei Cuisine: Japanese Food the South American Way by Luiz Hara, published by Jacqui Small. The prize includes delivery within in the UK. We cannot guarantee a pre-Christmas delivery date.
  • The prize cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • The prize is offered and provided by Jacqui Small.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, winners must be following @Kavey at the time of notification. Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check your accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Kavey Eats received a review copy from Jacqui Small . Nikkei Cuisine is currently available from Amazon UK for £19.99 (RRP £25) (at time of posting).

Nov 082015

I can’t believe two months have flown by since my last In & Out Of My Kitchen post!

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In early September we celebrated our 21st wedding anniversary with a lovely lunch at Hutong in the Shard. Marvellous views, good food and friendly service.

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One of my favourite lunch options near my office was Ju Mak, I always ordered lunch bowl number 1 – with sweet fried belly pork slices, kimchi, spring onions and a fried egg over rice. Sadly, when I went last week, the place was closed and I can’t tell whether it’s being refurbished and will reopen as the same restaurant, or whether Ju Mak is gone and a new place will open. Keeping my fingers crossed that I’ll be able to enjoy this tasty lunch again soon.

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Schwartz’ Deli, Timbits from Tim Hortons, Notre Dame Basilica, Restaurant Lemeac

In early September I headed to Canada for a really fantastic press trip. I’ve started sharing some of that with you already, but there are many, many more posts to come. My first stop was Montreal, a fantastically foodie city with a delightful mix of old and new districts, a really varied food scene and an incredible food market I fell head-over-aubergines for!

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Next stop was Quebec City which started with a driving tour around the gorgeous Île d’Orléans. Much of the island is farmland and I loved the farmgate shops selling fresh fruit and vegetables.

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Quebec City was a French food lover’s delight – had the best sweetbreads there I’ve eaten for a long time. And it’s also where I had my first real poutine, in the very place that is said to have invented them!


One of the most fascinating experiences for me was my visit to the Huron-Wendat Museum – a museum, hotel and restaurant dedicated to sharing first nation tradition with visitors. I loved chatting to executive chef Martin Gagné about the traditional ingredients he uses in the modern restaurant.

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After my time in Quebec I flew down to Ontario and made my way to Niagara-on-the-Lake for an incredible few days hosted by Michael and Anna Olson. Not only did they take us to their favourite local vineyards, restaurants, delis and farms, they also invited us into their home for dinner and breakfast, teaching us some of their delicious recipes before we sat down to eat.

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I adored the farmgate shops, especially the large one at Whitty Farms, where our group tasted our first Canadian Butter Tarts – an utter delight!

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I was particularly excited about this segment of my trip because it included visits to several local vineyards that make (amongst other types of wine) the famous local ice wine. This stunning dessert wine is a regional speciality and as a lover of dessert wines, I was absolutely in my element! I bought two bottles home with me but wish I could have carried back an entire suitcase!

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No visit to this beautiful region would be complete without a visit to the Niagara Falls and we enjoyed both a boat cruise and a spectacular helicopter ride over the falls, before being flown straight to our next destination – another wonderful vineyard for a very delicious lunch!

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I think what made the biggest impression on me about this area of Ontario was the locally grown produce. The variety was amazing (thanks to a very varied local geography that gives rise to a wide range of microclimates) and the quality absolutely superb. Of course, I bought some maple syrup (from both Quebec and Ontario) back home with me! Recipes featuring this gorgeous ingredient to come soon!

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My last stop was Toronto, a world class city that I absolutely loved exploring. After a zip around the eclectic wares of Tap Phong in China Town, and a phenomenal dim sum lunch at Luckee’s, we said goodbye to our hosts and to the lovely Diane, the tour manager who had looked after us so well for the preceding days. I stayed on in Toronto, returning first to China Town for a more in depth wander – the red bean bun I had in Hong Kong Island Bakery was one of the best such buns I’ve ever tasted!

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I also loved Kensington Market, a small but hip area with another fruit and vegetable market, and lots of small hip restaurants, cafes and ethnic groceries full of tempting ingredients and speciality foods.

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Once again, there were wonderful historical buildings and areas amongst more modern Toronto. And oh my goodness, just look at that view from my hotel room!

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When I got home, autumn had kicked in, though weather was still warmer than expected. We harvested lots of delicious plums from our allotment, and a handful of very tart but pretty red apples from our two youngest apple trees.


Missing Canada, the first thing I cooked on the weekend following my return home was an adaptation of Anna Olson’s sticky buns, a recipe she taught us during our visit to her home. You can find the original recipe, and my variations, here.

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One late September weekend I visited Food Blogger Connect, grateful that the rain stayed away given the unexpectedly outdoor nature of the venue. The street food stalls included treats from The Athenian (fantastic, delicious and generously sized wraps), Crazy for Pasta (who not only cooked but made their pasta fresh for every customer), The Pandan Bakery (who kindly introduced us to a variety of Malaysian treats) and Churros Garcia (which I confess I visited three times!)

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I was treated to some delicious foie gras products courtesy of Foie Gras Gourmet, an online mail order service specialising in high quality products from the Perigord.

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A lovely lunch at what I am certain is the best Lebanese in London reminded us that we should go much, much more often.

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Lunch is nearly always a mad rush out for a local takeaway and back to eat it within my half hour lunch break. Recent lunches include pork katsu don and a sushi box from Ohaio (affectionately known as the hole in the wall, located in New Malden Station), chicken katsu curry from Noodle Express, a mixed box of beef, rice and sweet and sour chicken from Do Bento, a huge jacket potato with bolognese and cheese from Village Cafe and a lamb wrap from somewhere at the other end of the high street, that one of my colleagues kindly collected on behalf of several of us for Shawarma Day!

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I will never ever get bored of eggs and toast!

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I went into China Town with a friend to review Viet Food, during which we popped into Cinnabon for some weekend treats and enjoyed the lanterns left up after the Moon Festival.

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A dear friend visited London and we caught up over a lovely lunch at Portrait Restaurant in the National Portrait Gallery. Lovely views, good food and warm and attentive service. Would go again!


Absolutely loved reviewing the latest food subscription service – Cheese Posties. Each delivery contains everything you need to make a delicious cheese toastie, with innovative flavour and ingredient combinations that make it lots of fun.

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What greater way to spend a weekend lunch than with friends over dim sum at Pearl Liang?

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Another recipe I really must share with you soon is the quick beef rendang we learned to make on a cookery class we attended earlier this year. This delicious recipe is a one pot meal (everything goes in together) and takes just a few hours rather than the traditional 12-18!

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats (text1) Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (2)

Lastly, please let me share some work I’m really proud of: It’s not unusual these days for food bloggers to take beautifully styled and photographed images of their recipes that are every bit as professional as tempting as those you find in glossy food magazines. But I’ve very rarely styled the food I post on Kavey Eats, snapping a few super quick grabshots before we tuck in to dinner; my ability to produce a planned and styled shot has remained pretty much untested. So I was really, really pleased with the recipes and photos I created for two recent commissioned posts, one for Quick Golden-Baked Peri Peri Chicken, Yoghurt & Rice Cake and the other for my Potato Rösti Pizza Base – I call it the Röstizza!

That’s an exhausting (but by no means exhaustive) meander through some of my food experiences during the last two months.

Thanks for reading!

And a warm wave at fellow In My Kitchen posters this month.

I’m submitting this post to Celia’s In My Kitchen series. Cheers, Celia!


PARTNEREDPOSTPotatoes have been getting a bit of a bad rap lately. The last couple of decades have witnessed a vilification of carbs; the noughties in particular saw a surge in uptake of diets advocating a severe reduction of carb intake. Even for those not following a low-carb diet, potatoes often lose out to pasta and rice, perceived as quicker and easier options.

But actually, potatoes are a versatile and very healthy ingredient – they’re inexpensive, 100% natural and unprocessed; they are low in fat and sugar and an excellent source of fibre and potassium; and they store very well – when we’ve had a particularly generous crop of home grown, we’ve been able to enjoy them for several months after harvesting by keeping them in a cool, dark cupboard.

Of course, they are also available to buy throughout the year – whether you shop at your local supermarket, independent grocer’s or food market. I like to buy by variety, experimenting to make up my own mind – do King Edwards or Maris Pipers make the best roasties? Are Charlottes or Red Duke of Yorks best for potato salad?

These days most retailers also label potatoes to indicate whether they are suitable for baking, boiling, mashing, frying and so on – the rule of thumb is that waxy varieties and new potatoes are great for potato salads because they hold their shape and texture well when boiled. Fluffier varieties are best for baking and roasting, and make fabulous chips. There are also many potatoes that can be considered good all-rounder varieties; find out more from the AHDB’s Potato Variety Database.

But the question remains – can you create a quick and delicious weekday supper using potatoes in the same time as it might take you to rustle up a pasta dinner or stir fried rice?

Of course, the answer is yes!

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (4)

We were challenged to create and share a new potato recipe, something quick, easy and suitable for a weekday lunch or dinner and a little adventurous and different to boot. I hope you’ll agree that our Röstizza – using a potato rösti as a gluten free pizza base – is just that!

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (2)

The Röstizza: Potato Rösti Pizza Base

Serves 2
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes

#glutenfree #quick #easy #recipe

400 grams potatoes
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
15-20 grams butter
2 teaspoons finely grated parmesan
1 teaspoon salt
75 grams grated mozzarella cheese
2 tablespoons pizza sauce
Optional: Very thinly sliced salami or chorizo sausage or other toppings of your choice

28 cm frying pan
Electric or gas hob

Note: We use a food processor to grate the potatoes and buy ready-grated mozzarella cheese for this recipe. Add a little more prep time if you grate both by hand.


  • Peel and grate the potatoes.
  • Microwave the grated potatoes in a bowl for approximately 1 minute on full power, until piping hot.
  • In the meantime, heat butter and oil in a frying pan on a medium heat.
  • Retrieve grated potatoes from the microwave, add grated parmesan and salt and mix thoroughly.
  • Add potato mixture to the pan, toss briefly to coat well in butter and oil, then spread out to create a flat and even rösti, pressing down firmly.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7606

  • Fry the rösti pizza base for about 12-15 minutes until golden brown beneath, checking by lifting an edge very carefully with a spatula towards the end of the cooking time. The time will vary depending on your frying pan and the exact level of heat.
  • Once the bottom edge is golden brown, use two plates to help flip the rösti over: Place the first plate upside down over the pan, use oven gloves to grip both plate and pan firmly together and flip over to transfer the rösti onto the plate. Now use a second plate to flip the rösti over again. Pour out any remaining oil from the pan if need be, before placing it upside down over the second plate, and flipping both over one last time. The rösti should now be upside down within the frying pan. This isn’t as complicated as it sounds, and much less risky than trying to flip the fragile rösti directly in the pan.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7609 Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7613

  • Preheat the grill to high.
  • Turn the heat on the hob up to high and add the toppings over the golden brown surface. First spread the pizza sauce, then the grated cheddar and then add any additional toppings such as salami slices, mushrooms or other vegetables. This should take no more than 4-5 minutes, allowing the second side of the rösti to crisp up.

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  • Transfer the pan to the grill for about 2 minutes, until the cheese is melted and starting to colour.
  • Serve immediately.

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (1)

Rostizza - Potato Rosti Pizza Base on Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (3)

As you can imagine, it’s easy to ring the changes by switching what you put on top.

Try pesto instead of a tomato-based pizza sauce or skip the sauce entirely for a pizza bianco.

Use a mixture of cheeses to create your own quattro formaggi (four cheeses).

As for toppings, you could opt for ham and cheese, pepperoni and jalapeno or a wonderful vegetarian medley of mushrooms, onions or peppers.

For more quick and easy potato recipes, check out:

This recipe was commissioned by Love Potatoes, as part of their ‘Potatoes: More than a bit on the side’ campaign. Visit their website for more great potato recipes and detailed nutritional information.


The food at NOPI restaurant is a heady mix of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean flavours with additional influences from around the world – just the kind of cooking my friend and fellow blogger Lisa aka Cookwitch adores, so I asked her to review this new cookbook written by Yotam Ottolenghi and NOPI’s head chef Ramael Scully on my behalf. I am sure you will enjoy her guest post below; to learn more about Lisa read my recent Meet The Blogger interview with her, here.


Most people have heard of Yotam Ottolenghi, the gently spoken Israeli of the big brown eyes and welcoming smile, wandering around the world in search of beautiful food. Many may not have heard of Scully.

No, this is not a foray into X-Files alien food, this is a wonderful partnership – sometimes more of a tug o’ war – between the more familiar Mediterranean influences of Yotam and the still slightly mysterious Eastern zing of Scully, a chef raised between Australia and Malaysia.

They say:

“The Mediterranean influence is still strong in our cooking but we are as likely, these days, to be reaching for the mirin and miso as we are towards the pomegranate molasses, olive oil and date syrup. The cupboard is wide, the menu ever-changing and the experiments ever-underway. We continue on with both a boundless enthusiasm and an unswerving dedication to detail. The result is some very merry-making food.”

Merry-making food? Bring it on, I say.

The book is an utter joy right from the start. The voice of it is extremely loving, and slightly teasing, telling of the differences in approach between Scully and Yotam, plus properly highlighting the brilliance and dedication of the rest of the staff. To paraphrase;

Scully: How about we put a chilli/salt/pickle garnish there?

Yotam: Do we even need a garnish?

It is a restaurant cookbook, yes, with the most popular dishes from NOPI, but everything in it seems achievable. If extra time is needed, it tells you. If an ingredient is hard to source, it tells you what you can use instead.

It also doesn’t talk down to, or over you, or assumes that you already know everything. For me, it gave me that bit more confidence in making some of the recipes.

Every photo almost glows on the page. There are simple dishes, with just a few ingredients, and there are long and involved ones, but you never get the sense that the author is telling you not to attempt them because you’re not a chef.

There are some I wouldn’t do unless I had a week off, and some I could probably do in an evening, if I was organised (or motivated) enough, but in the main I would put them down as being Weekend with Nothing To Do cooking. (Other people count a weekend spent cooking as relaxation too, don’t they? Not just me? Anyone?)

Having spent a week buried in the book, I finally decided on the courgette fritter recipe.

I’ve been on a real vegetable kick lately, and though the Mixed Cauliflowers with Golden Raisins, Ricotta and Capers called to me, I had overdosed on cauliflower the week before, so I felt a nice, green change was needed. Plus it has cheese in it, so that was a done deal.

I admit that I am NOT a recipe book cook. I am a recipe book reader. I honestly find cooking from someone else’s recipes quite tiring, as I think I get nervous that I’m going to do it wrong, or miss a step. If I try a recipe that I know I will want to make again, I write it down in a small notebook, and list the steps in the order that I would cook them. Once I’ve done that, it makes it easier. I know, I’m weird.

I really did want to give this a try though, so I persevered. Even though I read the recipe countless times, I still managed to forget things when I went shopping. I also changed some ingredients. One out of necessity and another because I loathe the original.

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Courgette and Feta Fritters

Adapted by Lisa from Nopi: The Cookbook

For the fritters
3 courgettes, coarsely grated, then popped in a colander with 1 tsp salt to drain
2 eggs, lightly beaten
60 g self raising flour (might use chickpea flour next time, lower the carb count and make it GF friendly)
2.5 tsp ground coriander
1.5 tsp ground cumin (original was ground cardamom, but I really dislike it, and 1.5 tsp is a LOT)
2 small shallots very finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, grated (I used a garlic press)
Finely grated zest of two limes
150g feta, crumbled into 1cm bits (original recipe calls for manouri cheese which is hard to find unless you have a Greek grocer near you)
For the sauce
200ml sour cream
5g chopped coriander (I had none, so I used chopped celery leaves that I had in the freezer)
1/2 tsp ground cardamom (nope, not me!)
grated zest and juice of 1 lime. (I totally forgot the juice)


  • When the courgettes have sat for 10 minutes, squeeze all of the water out and put into a large bowl.
  • Add in the spices, flour, shallots and zest, then mix in the egg.
  • Gently mix in the crumbled feta so that it doesn’t disperse too much.
  • (The book says to put oil in a frying pan to a depth of 2-3mm but with a good non-stick pan, you probably won’t need that much.)
  • When the oil is hot, drop in dessertspoonfuls of the mixture, 4 at a time spaced well apart. Flatten them a bit with the spoon.
  • (I formed mine into loose and slightly lumpy quenelles, to see if I could, but that is really not necessary.)
  • Cook for 6 minutes, until they are browned and crispy on one side, then turn them over and cook the other side.
  • For the sauce, mix together all the ingredients.
  • Drain the fritters on paper towels, and serve hot with the dip, though they are equally good when lukewarm. I would reheat them in the oven, they should crisp up again.

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The second recipe of the day was the result of misreading another recipe further into the book. There’s a recipe in the book for lamb rump with vanilla braised chicory. I parsed it as vanilla braised lamb. When I realised I thought, well, why not? So this happened.

My Brain:

“Ooh, lamb with vanilla. No, wait, that’s lamb with CHICORY braised with vanilla.
Although…[goes to shops]
What would you braise it in? I’ve got red wine, but would rosé be better? Marsala perhaps? Nobody’s got that. No, I’ll have to stick with red. Maybe the butcher has venison! That would work.
[goes to butcher]
No, the lamb leg looks nicer. Still not sure about this cooking liquid though.
Hang on…[mentally catalogues shelves]
Tea. I have vanilla tea. And cinnamon sticks. Ok…this might work. ”
What was actually said out loud:

Vanilla & Red Wine Lamb

Inspired by Nopi: The Cookbook’s Lamb Rump with Vanilla Braised Chicory

1/2 small leg of lamb, bone in, FAT ON, in a covered casserole dish
2 small bottles red wine (18.7cl)
2 small bottle’s worth of water
1/2 cup Vanilla Ceylon Tea
5 dried rosehips
1 shallot, cut in half (not peeled)
1 small stick cinnamon, snapped in half
1 vanilla pod, split in half lengthways
2 tbs honey
1 tbs date/carob/fig molasses – or blackstrap molasses


  • Put all the above in a pan, bring to the boil, then lower the heat right down and simmer for an hour.
  • Take off the heat, leave to cool, then pour it all over the lamb. Place the vanilla pod on top of the lamb joint.
  • Cover, place in a hot oven (200C) for 1/2 an hour, then turn the heat down to 150C and let it cook for a good 3 hours. Test it for tenderness at the 3-4 hour mark, and if it’s tender (it fell off the bone for me) then keep the meat warm and reduce the sauce down in a pan on the stove top until it is thick and jammy.
  • Serve it with roasted squash or mashed parsnips, or perhaps a puree of white beans because that sauce, oh that sauce, needs a transportation vehicle. Or maybe just a loaf of good bread…

I am still reading through the book.

Venison fillet with Date Labneh, Blackberries and Peanut Crumble anyone?


NOPI: The Cookbook is published by Ebury Press, who provided a review copy to Kavey Eats. Currently available from Amazon for just £12.99 (RRP £28).



The name of this dish may not roll off the tongue, descriptive though it is.

But I promise you that it’s easy to make and absolutely delicious. It’s just the recipe for those occasions when you want to make something a bit special, unusual and impressive but are short on time and not in the mood for faff. In short it’s a recipe that punches above its weight and I urge you to give it a try!

I first made Persian Tahcheen-e morgh several years ago, following a Greg Malouf recipe from his book Saraban. A crisp, golden crust on the rice is highly sought after and worthy of oohs and aahs when the baked dish is turned out for all to admire, and then there’s the pleasure of digging into the rice and discovering moist chicken within.

A couple of years later, I came up with my Persian-Mozambique fusion version, replacing the subtle orange blossom and saffron flavours of the original with punchier peri peri. It was absolutely fantastic and yet we’ve only made it a couple of times since because, let’s be frank, parboiling rice is a bit of a faff and the 1.5 hour baking time doesn’t win points for a speedy supper either.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (text2)

This quick version of that fusion success story is far easier to pull together and most of the ingredients are long life products you can keep on hand in the kitchen cupboard. You’ll need to stock your cupboard with Veetee Heat & Eat rice, your favourite brand of peri peri sauce and some butter, salt and pepper.

All you need to pick up on the way home is a pack of ready-cooked chicken breast and a pot of natural yoghurt and you’re ready to go.

I’m not a huge fan of flavoured microwavable rice, though Pete likes them for a super quick meal when short of time. But London-based rice brand Veetee offer packs of Heat & Eat rice with no extraneous flavours added. They’re fantastic! Choose from Basmati, Long Grain, Wholegrain and Thai Jasmine or for some added colour and nuttiness, a Basmati and Wild Rice mix. One packet is a generous portion for one; my recipe uses two packs for a two-person meal.

Key equipment for this recipe is a suitably-sized and heavy-based frying pan. Ours is 20 cm in diameter and 5 cm deep. If yours is smaller or larger, you may need to adjust amounts as well as cooking time.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle (text3)


Quick Golden-Baked Peri Peri Chicken, Yoghurt & Rice Cake

Serves 2
Prep time: 5-10 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes

2 packs Veetee Heat & Eat long grain or basmati rice
150 grams full fat thick natural yoghurt
1-2 tablespoons peri peri sauce
Half teaspoon salt
150 grams cooked chicken*, roughly chopped
Approximately 50 grams butter for generous greasing
Optional: extra natural yoghurt to serve on the side
Optional: coriander leaves for garnish

* You can buy packs of ready-cooked chicken breast from the supermarket but leftover roast chicken is also perfect for this recipe.


Heavy-based frying pan, 20 cm diameter and at least 5 cm deep.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7546


  • In a large bowl, open 2 packs of (unheated) Veetee Heat & Eat long grain or basmati rice and use a spatula or wooden spoon to gently break the blocks down into loose rice.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7545 Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7553

  • Add the yoghurt, salt and 1-2 tablespoons of peri peri sauce – the exact amount will depend on how fiery your chosen peri peri sauce is and how strong you’d like the finished dish to taste – and combine thoroughly.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7557

  • In a separate bowl, add a teaspoon of peri peri sauce to the chopped chicken and mix well.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7560

  • Butter the frying pan very generously all over the bottom and sides. If you stint on butter, you may struggle to turn your rice cake out when cooked, and you won’t get a beautiful golden crust either.
  • Spoon a little over half the rice mixture into the pan to create an even layer across the base and slightly up the sides. Press down the spatula or spoon to make sure the rice is evenly distributed.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7566

  • Spread the chicken across the rice base, except at the outer edges. Evenly cover with remaining rice, smooth and press down.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7567 Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-7569

  • Cover the pan tightly with foil (or a snug-fitting lid, if you have one) and cook over a medium flame for 18-20 minutes.
  • When the cooking time is done, remove the foil and gently run a knife around the outer edge of the pan.
  • Position a plate over the pan, hold both firmly together and flip over. If you buttered sufficiently, the rice cake should slip out onto the plate.
  • Garnish with coriander leaves and serve immediately, with extra natural yoghurt on the side.

Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-0350 Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle-0365 C

You may also enjoy these recipes featuring Veetee microwavable rice:

 Quick Golden Baked Peri Peri Chicken Yoghurt and Rice Cake - Kavey Eats (text1)


This post is a paid recipe commission for Veetee. All opinions my own.


If you follow me on Instagram, Twitter or my blog’s Facebook page you’ll have noticed that I visited Canada recently, taking in Montreal, Quebec City, Toronto and the region around Niagara-on-the-Lake. I’ll be sharing lots (and lots and lots!) from that trip in coming weeks. I totally loved all the destinations I visited and cannot wait to go back with Pete for a self-drive holiday.

Our tour of the Niagara region was hosted by husband-and-wife chefs Michael and Anna Olson who not only took us to visit their favourite local producers, vineyards, restaurants and markets but also invited us into their home for dinner and breakfast. We learned several of their delicious recipes, getting involved, asking questions and taking photographs as we laughed and chatted the hours away.

A recipe we all adored was Anna’s Blueberry Sticky Buns, which she made for us with blueberries and peaches, both in season in the local area.

Keen to take inspiration from Anna’s reverence for local and seasonal ingredients, I switched the blueberries and peaches for plums and blackberries gathered from our allotment just hours before.

Plum and Blackberry Sticky Buns - Anna Olson Recipe - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle - textoverlay

Anna’s original recipe calls for buns to be cooked individually in a muffin tin, but I’ve followed the variation she showed us to tuck them all together into a baking dish and turn them out whole for a wonderful family-style tear-and-share result. Also following Anna’s example, Pete and I made the dough, filling and buns in the evening, popped them into the fridge overnight to rise slowly and baked them for a perfect Sunday breakfast the next morning.

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I’m sharing Anna’s original recipe below.

To make my plum and blackberry version, just switch out the blueberries. Of course, you can use your choice of berries or chopped fruit.

To make the tear-and-share version, smear some of the maple-cinnamon filling across the bottom of a baking dish, and sit the buns side by side on top of that, within the dish. Either rise for half an hour at room temperature, or overnight in the fridge.

We found that the buns need an extra 10-15 minutes in the oven when cooked this way.


Anna Olson’s Blueberry Sticky Buns

Makes 12 sticky buns

2 ¼ tsp / 8 g dry active yeast
¼ cup / 60 ml warm water
1/2 cup/ 125 ml milk, room temperature
1 egg, at room temperature
2 tbsp/ 25 g granulated sugar
2 ½ cups/ 375 g all-purpose flour
½ tsp / 2 g salt
½ tsp / 2 ml ground nutmeg
½ cup / 115 g unsalted butter, room temperature
½ cup / 125 g cream cheese, room temperature
Sticky Bun Filling:
½ cup / 115 g unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup / 200 g packed light brown sugar
3 tsp / 45 ml maple syrup
1 tbsp / 15 ml cinnamon
2 cups / 500 ml fresh or frozen blueberries


Sticky Bun Dough:

  • Dissolve yeast in water and allow to sit for 5 minutes.
  • In a mixer, add milk, egg and sugar and blend. Add flour, salt and nutmeg and mix for 1 minute to combine. Add butter and cream cheese and knead for 5 minutes on medium speed.
  • Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover and let rest 1 hour.

Sticky Bun Filling:

  • Combine butter, sugar, maple syrup and cinnamon. Spoon a tablespoonful of filling into bottom of each cup of a greased 12-cup muffin tin.
  • Preheat oven to 350 F / 180 C.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into a rectangle 1/2- inch thick.
  • Spread remaining filling over the dough, sprinkle with blueberries and roll up lengthwise.
  • Slice dough into 12 equal portions and arrange them in muffin tin. Allow to rise for 1/2 hour.
  • Bake for 30 minutes, and turn out onto a plate while still warm.


Huge thanks to Anna for sharing and showing us her delicious recipe, and for giving permission to share it with you. And of course, thanks to all of those involved in making my trip to Canada so amazing. I can’t wait to share more with you soon!

Kavey Eats visited Canada as a guest of Tourism Quebec, Ontario Travel & Destination Canada. The Anna Olson recipe is reproduced with permission.


Edge of Belgravia is a contemporary chef knife brand established in 2010. Based in London, the brand prides itself on the avant-gard design and quality of its products combined with a modern marketing approach.

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The Black Diamond knife block, designed by Christian Bird, is not only a piece of art for the kitchen but also superbly useful, suitable for most knives with a blade thickness of up to 4 mm. The futuristic design can hold up to 11 knives, but looks just as elegant with less. Clever use of weighting holds knives securely in place and they are easy to extract too.

Edge of Belgravia’s Precision Chef Knives have a similarly bold and modern design, and look wonderful in the Black Diamond knife block. The stainless steel blades cut well and are easy to sharpen. The Complete Set contains a bread knife, a chef’s knife, a paring knife and a deba (aka Japanese salmon) knife.

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Edge of Belgravia are giving away a Black Diamond Knife Block (RRP £99.90) and the Precision Chef knife Complete Set (£69.90) to one lucky Kavey Eats reader.

The prize includes free delivery in the UK.

Entry to the giveaway is via Rafflecopter and we’ve provided lots of ways to gain extra entries and increase your chances of winning!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Kavey Eats received review samples from Edge of Belgravia.

Sep 042015

Forgive me Celia for I have sinned. It has been 3 months since my last confession In My Kitchen. Before checking, I thought I’d missed a month, probably two but gosh, doesn’t time fly by faster than you can shake a stick at, how on earth did it get to three? Lest I mix any more merry metaphors, here’s a big catch up post of what I’ve been eating (and doing) since the last time, mostly courtesy of my Instagram account!

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Back in June I reviewed Kate Doran’s Homemade MemoriesKate Doran’s Homemade Memories for my regular column in Good Things magazine. We (mostly Pete) made her amazing bourbon biscuits, a grown up version where American bourbon is an ingredient in the filling that sandwiches the biscuits together. They were terrific (and I really do need to write a review of the book for Kavey Eats too).

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The purple rose we bought for our front garden has been flowering gloriously this year, and indeed it’s given us bursts of colour from June right through into September. Sometimes the colour veers towards pink but the bluer purple is the usual colour and what we chose the variety for.

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We had another lovely lunch at local Vietnamese restaurant, but the next time we walked by a week or two later, it had sadly closed its doors. It’s not an easy climate in which to run a successful restaurant business, especially in residential neighbourhoods like ours which don’t benefit from tourists or commuters.

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The fruits of summer 2016 have definitely been watermelon and British cherries, both of which I’ve eaten inordinate volumes of. And two of those cherries were the first ever fruit from our own little cherry tree, planted in the back garden a couple of years ago. There have been some great strawberries, raspberries and loganberries too, a brief gorge of Pakistani mangoes and the usual fruit bowls full of grapes, apples, peaches and sungold kiwifruits (a super sweet golden variety that I tried for the first time).

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My social life in the last several months has been somewhat curtailed by my longer-than-usual commute – my current contract role being down in New Malden, Surrey. But I’ve enjoyed taking some snaps of Waterloo station, where I transfer between tube and train services.

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I attended a delicious event on British lamb hosted by Cyrus Todiwala (another post still on my To Do list) and a preview launch at Yo Sushi where my friend Gary and I were able to try the Japanese Hot Dogs (thumbs up), Furi Furi Fries (double thumbs up) and an odd ice cream dumpling caramel dessert (icky thumbs down).

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This year has forced us to say goodbye to a number of loved ones, first Pete’s mum in spring, then my uncle (my dad’s younger brother) and then my dad’s own uncle too, and most recently, one of Pete’s brothers. No-one in their right minds enjoys a funeral but at the same time I’m enormously glad that we were able to be there to start the grieving process and say our goodbyes.

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Our local pub, The Bohemia, remains a favourite hang out, even if we don’t make it there quite as often as we’d like. Wings Wednesday is a firm favourite, as our Sunday roasts and the regular menu too – the barnsley chop, potato salad and tomato onion salad dish they had on recently was just fantastic.

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I will never get bored of boiled eggs and dipping toast. Or my egg cup collection.

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And I will never get bored of marzipan, especially the very best marzipan. I reviewed Niederegger here on the blog a while ago but received an additional delivery – a box of their alcoholic flavoured marzipans, which I eked out as long as I could. All fantastic but my favourites were pistachio, mirabelle brandy, apple calvados and plum armagnac.

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Pete got me a Minion cupcake kit for funs!


I went to several Christmas in July press previews and made friends with Rudolph, during a visit to Carluccio’s.

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HyperJapan was in the O2 this year. For me, my favourite part was the Sake Experience, which I wrote about recently, along with a Beginner’s Guide To Sake. The architecture of the dome itself and surrounding buildings is worth a visit in its own right, of course. Incidentally, that photo of me with my head stuck through the peepboard won me a cute little Japanese cat moneybox from Inside Japan!

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My friend Asma has been wowing diners (myself included) at her Indian supper club for the last couple of years, and rightly so. Now Darjeeling Express is in residence at The Sun & 13 Cantons in Soho, where we stopped in for a fantastic lunch a couple of months ago.

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Brita invited me to a class on using a Chemex, the iconic pour over coffee device invented by Peter Schlumbohm.

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I had a couple more fantastic meals at Yijo, our local Korean restaurant. Just so good!

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During the brief reign of summer, we enjoyed a lovely barbeque with local friends, and Pete was treated to some very fine whiskies too.

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Our allotment cabbages have done particularly well this year, as have the courgettes at home (as always). The tomatoes are just starting to come through now – Tigarellas, Black Cherries and the candy-sweet Sungold.

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I’ve been enjoying lots of picnic lunches (albeit at my desk or in the office kitchen) to try and break my addiction to the delicious Korean and Japanese cooked lunches I’ve been enjoying far too many off.

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As well as our lovely purple rose, I’ve been enjoying flowers in the local neighbourhood front gardens.

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I’ve indulged my love of the very best chocolate twice this summer (and that’s if we don’t count Niederegger as chocolate!) After reviewing Bonieri chocolates, including their top quality gianduja spread, I bought myself another two bags of their gorgeous chocolate-covered hazelnut nougat.

More recently, I couldn’t resist a box of Paul A Young chocolates – my favourites were the banoffee, the scone with clotted cream and jam and the peanut butter and raspberry jelly.

To bring it back to earth, I also tried a new limited edition kitkat in Toffee flavour, which Pete picked up in a local supermarket. I’ve been trying to track down their mocha flavour to no avail.

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I went short this summer – the shortest my hair has been since I was at school *mumble* decades ago! And here’s a recent one of Pete with a pint of Kirin draft, just because!

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Me and my mum at a recent family gathering and one of little Kavey – the fashion probably gives the decade away pretty conclusively!

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And to finish, a random set! Top row: Minon gifts (and marzipan) from my friend Anne; another minion gift as a place setting at my friend Heidi’s catered dinner party; strange and wonderful crisps from the Korean supermarket next to my office. Bottom row: strawberries, cream and meringue (the ingredients for my Eton Mess Ice Lollies); flowers in the back garden and hipster Kavey.

I’m submitting this post to the very lovely Celia’s In My Kitchen series. Check out her wonderful Fig Jam & Lime Cordial blog. Looking at the length of this one, I really need to try and participate more regularly!


What a damp squib August has been. Yeah, we’ve had a few days of sunshine here and there but the traditional run of hot summer days has felt distinctly autumnal (and wet) much of the time.

Still, some of you have found the sunshine and motivation to share some crowd-pleasing coolers.


You’ll see in a moment why Margot from Coffee & Vanilla, is a lady after my own heart with these gorgeous Banana & Custard Ice Cream Lollies. Super quick and easy, using ready made custard as their base, these are a perfect way to offer up a tasty frozen treat within just a few hours.

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This 2 ingredient Watermelon Sorbet by Little Sunny Kitchen is definitely full of tropical sunshine. I can just taste it now, with the zing of lime juice cutting through the super sweet watermelon flavour.

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First up, a wonderfully inventive idea from Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diary – these Blackberry Breakfast Pops make it totally OK to have an ice lolly for breakfast, by combining blackberries and yoghurt to make a colourful froyo, and adding in some crunchy granola! I think this is such a clever way to add texture and another flavour.

Roasted Banana Ice Lollies aka Paletas Ice Pops Popsicles - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle -overlay 2

Like Margot, I was all about the bananas this month. My Roasted Banana & Cream Ice Lollies are inspired by a South American paletas recipe I jotted down a while ago and I have to say, roasting the bananas before blending the mix really gives such a wonderful mellow flavour. I used rich double cream instead of yoghurt.


Kellie, author of Food To Glow, has created another healthy version of a very indulgent classic. Her Chocolate-Raspberry Fudgsicles use avocado, yes you read that right, combined with greek yoghurt to create a creamy, rich base flavoured with cocoa powder, raspberries, honey and vanilla.


Margot gets the double duty BSFIC award this month, as she posted a second delicious recipe for Raspberryade Ice Pops. And she ought to get an award for double leftover usage too – the raspberryade itself was a way to use leftovers from making a raspberry spong cake, and the ice pops were a way to use the leftover raspberryade – good thinking, Margot!


Last but not least is Sarah from Taming Twins’ grown up contribution – her Gin & Tonic Ice Lollies look just the thing for calming down a frazzled parent and I reckon us non-parents might be rather keen too!

Interestingly, all but one of this month’s entries would also have fit into last month’s challenge – do check out last month’s round up for more ice lolly inspiration!


Thank you all for joining in with Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream this month! I’ll be posting the next theme shortly.


Lizzie Mabbott is a prodigious cook and a prodigious eater!

I’ve been following her cooking and eating exploits on the web for many years, first on the now-defunct BBC food discussion boards and since 2008 on her well-known blog, Hollowlegs. If she isn’t eating she may well be cooking, if she isn’t cooking she might be shopping for ingredients, and if she isn’t doing either of those things, there’s a good chance she’s pondering on what to eat or cook next!

When I learned that she had secured a book deal I was not surprised in the slightest as her delicious personal twists on classic British, European, Chinese and other South East Asian dishes have long made many readers salivate, myself included.

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In Chinatown Kitchen she draws upon her amazing heritage; Lizzie is Anglo-Chinese, born in Hong Kong where she spent her formative years growing up not only on Chinese food but also exposed to the many cuisines of South East Asia. At 13 she was transplanted to England, where she has been ever since – albeit with some judicious globetrotting to feed those hollow legs!

To describe the book as simply another tome on South East Asian cooking is to put it into a box that it doesn’t neatly fit into. It’s much more than Chinese – or even South East Asian – food made easy; rather it’s a very personal collection of recipes that represent Lizzie’s personal food story. There are classic Chinese and South East Asian dishes, sure, but there are also a fair few of Lizzie’s own inventions including some excellent mashups such as this Chinese Spag Bol recipe and an Udon Carbonara.

Most recipes are illustrated with colourful and appealing photographs, styled but not overly fussy and with the focus firmly on the food.

At the heart of the book is the idea of seeking out ingredients in the food shops of your nearest Chinatown – or indeed any oriental supermarkets or groceries you can find – and putting them to delicious use. To that end, the book is not just a set of recipes but also a shopping and ingredient guide. Add to that an introduction to key equipment and techniques and you are all set to get cooking.

I tried hard not to bookmark every single recipe on my first pass, when trying to narrow down the list of what to make first. I ended up with 23 recipes bookmarked: Deep-Fried Whole Fish in Chilli, Bean Sauce, Japanese Spinach and Cucumber Salad, Grilled Aubergines with Nuoc Cham, Korean Rice Cakes with Chorizo and Greens, Sesame and Peanut Noodle Salad, Cabbage in Vinegar Sauce, Chinese Chive Breads, Griddled Teriyaki King Oyster Mushrooms, Banana Rotis, Poached Pears in Lemon Grass Syrup, Braised Egg Tofu with Pork and Aubergine, Spicy Peanut and Tofu Puff Salad, Fish Paste-Stuffed Aubergine, Mu Shu Pork, Steamed Egg Custard with Century and Salted Eggs, Cola Chicken Wings, Red-Braised Ox Cheek, Xinjiang Lamb Skewers, Red Bean Ice Lollies and Black Sesame Ice Cream with Black and White Sesame Honeycomb, plus the two I’ve already mentioned!

So far, we’ve made two recipes, Chinese Spag Bol and Roast Rice-Stuffed Chicken. We’ve loved both and will certainly be working out way through the rest of my “short” list over coming weeks and months.

Lizzie Mabbott Chinese Spagbol - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle overlay

Lizzie Mabbott’s Chinese Spag Bol

As Lizzie explains, this recipe has little in common with the bastardised ragu we call Spag Bol in Britain – there are no tomatoes, nor red wine for a start – but it is made by simmering minced meat in a sauce and dressing noodles with the results. The predominant flavour comes from yellow bean sauce, with additional notes from soy sauce, hoisin and Shaoxing wine. Lizzie servies it with fresh vegetables and finely sliced omelette.

Serves 4

2 free range eggs
2 tbsp cooking oil
2 spring onions, white parts finely chopped, green parts sliced into rings
5 garlic cloves, very finely chopped
2 tsp peeled and very finely chopped fresh root ginger
400 g (14 ox) fatty minced pork
3 tbsp yellow bean paste
1 tsp light soy sauce
1 tsp dark soy sauce
1 tbsp hoisin sauce
100 ml (3.5 fl oz) water
2 tbsp Shaoxing rice wine
1 carrot, peeled
Half cucumber
300 g fresh Shanghai noodles


  • Firstly, beat the eggs. Heat 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil in a wok, or a nonstick frying pan, until shimmering, add the beaten eggs and cook them over a medium heat until set to make a thin omelette. Remove to a plate and set to one side.
  • Heat up the rest of the oil in the wok over a medium heat, add the spring onion whites, garlic and ginger and stir-fry until fragrant. Then add the minced pork, breaking up any clumps with your hands, and cook until browned. Add the yellow bean paste, soy sauces and hoi sin sauce with the water and Shaoxing rice wine and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. If it’s looking a little dry, add a touch more water.
  • Meanwhile, julienne the carrot and cucumber and set aside. Roll the omelette up and slice finely.
  • Cook the noodles in a large saucepan of boiling water for a minute, then drain and place in a big serving bowl. Pour the meat sauce on top, then add the vegetables and omelette and stir to combine. Garnish with the greens of the spring onion and serve.

191929-Lizzie Mabbott Chinese Spag Bol - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle


Lizzie Mabbott’s Roast Rice-Stuffed Chicken

9332-Lizzie Mabbott Chinese Roast Chicken with Sticky Rice Stuffing - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle overlay 9339-Lizzie Mabbott Chinese Roast Chicken with Sticky Rice Stuffing - Kavey Eats © Kavita Favelle notext

The Roast Rice-Stuffed Chicken is a slightly more involved dish requiring the chicken to be marinated overnight (in a marinade that includes red fermented tofu and oyster sauce, amongst other ingredients) and the sticky rice filling to be made ahead ready to stuff inside the chicken before roasting. I made the wrong call to substitute a black sticky rice I had in my larder for the white sticky rice Lizzie’s recipe stipulates, and I’m sure that was the reason my mandarin peel and Chinese sausage-studded rice wasn’t sufficiently cooked through, but I do want try again with the right rice, as the flavours were fabulous. What’s more, the marinade on its own was super easy and amazingly delicious; even if we don’t have time to do the rice stuffing every time, I know the marinade will be used again and again.


Chinatown Kitchen: From Noodles to Nuoc Cham is currently available on Amazon UK for £10 (RRP £20). Kavey Eats received a review copy from publisher Mitchell Beazley. Recipe text reproduced with permission from Mitchell Beazley.

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