My ‘bloggers scream for ice cream’ monthly challenge event invites bloggers to create ice cream recipes to a theme. All entries are featured in a monthly round up post and themes are broad enough to allow plenty of room for creativity, to beginners and old hands alike. You don’t even need an ice cream machine to enter, so what are you waiting for?!

 

We’ve been blessed with a fair bit of warm and sunny weather these last few weeks, and even though we’ll no doubt have another cold snap or two, spring has definitely sprung. Hardy Brits everywhere have already enjoyed their first barbecue of the year; the rest of us will no doubt follow soon. Surely it won’t be long before we’re filling paddling pools in the back garden and picnicking and sunbathing in the parks – indeed anywhere we can find a patch of sunshine.

It seems the right time to resurrect BSFIC – time to join together with fellow bloggers in making and sharing frozen treats, with a different theme to challenge us every month.

I’m returning to the last challenge I proposed last year, to kick things off.

IceCreamVan-Creative-Commons-attribu
Image by Kenjonbro, used under Creative Commons license (attribution, non commercial)

Many of us have an almost Pavlovian response to the music of the ice cream van; a collective memory leading to a shared reaction…

First we catch the distinctive trill far in the distance. Suddenly alert, our ears strain to work out the direction of travel. Each time the music stops, we enviously envisage kids – other kids in some other street – jostling at the van’s window. Eventually, the music’s increasing volume announces the van’s approach; our turn has come. It’s time to beg money from parents and race out into the street to wait the last few moments… expectantly, eagerly, impatiently. Finally, the ice cream van trundles into sight, greeted by excited whoops and shouted exclamations about which ice creams we want. When our turn at the window comes, we must urgently narrow down our potential choices and settle on just one. Flake 99, Screwball, Orange Split, Funny Feet, Cornetto, Twister, Rocket, Mini Milk, Fab, Calippo, Lemonade Lolly or, in later years, Solero, Feast, Magnum… Order placed, money handed over, we grasp our frozen treasure and walk carefully away, mindful of the time we dropped our bounty and watched it melt forlornly on the pavement. In minutes, we wolf it down and, satiated, return to our play.

Chasing The Ice Cream Van

So here’s the challenge – take inspiration from your favourite ice cream van treats for your BSFIC entry this month.

Whether you choose to recreate the original faithfully or simply use ice cream van staples  as a starting point for your own creative twists is completely up to you.

Of course, I’ve listed British favourites in my nostalgic prose above, but I want you to draw on your own experiences and memories. Tell me what ice cream vans (or trucks or bikes or carts) were like where you grew up. What did you love to order? How do your memories play into what you have chosen to make?

icecreamvanmenu2_thumb icecreamvanmenu3_thumb

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a recipe that fits the challenge by the 28th of April.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • In your post, include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge (below).
  • Email me (by the 28th of April) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer), the link to your post and an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

If you like, tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC. I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on the Kavey Eats Facebook page.

I’ll post a round up of all the entries at the end of the month.

IceCreamChallenge_thumb

For more ideas, check out my my Pinterest ice cream board and past BSFIC Entries board.

If you have any questions at all, please get in touch!

Aug 252013
 

Do you remember shandy ice lollies from the ice cream van? I only ordered them occasionally, flitting between my love for cornettos, those lollies with a thick fruit shell around a vanilla ice cream core and of course, the amazing screwball with bubblegum balls at the bottom of an inverted dalek of soft white ice cream.

I decided to make a grown up version – a slightly stronger flavour of beer mixed into traditional lemonade with less sugar and more sharpness.

ShandyLolly-1378 ShandyLolly-1381

Grown Up Shandy Ice Lollies

Makes approximately 3 lollies

Ingredients
200 ml beer of your choice, not overly hoppy
200 ml traditional lemonade

Note: I used one of Pete’s home brew beers, a dark mild ale. Don’t use one that is too strongly hopped as the bitterness will be increased by the reduction process. For the lemonade, I used Ben Shaws cloudy lemonade, which has a sharp real lemon flavour.

Method

  • Over a low heat, reduce the beer by three quarters (till you’re left with 50 ml of liquid).
  • Add the beer reduction to your cloudly lemonade bit by bit until you’re happy with the balance. I added 30 ml to 200 ml of lemonade.
  • Mix well and freeze. I used my Zoku to freeze the liquid quickly but these would work perfectly well poured into traditional lolly moulds and popped into the freezer for a few hours. If you haven’t got lolly moulds, use small plastic cups!

The result was definitely more grown up than the shandy lollies of my childhood, with a decent lemon tang and real beer flavour.

 

This is my entry into the current BSFIC challenge – the theme is Chasing The Ice Cream Van.

IceCreamChallenge

All are welcome to enter, so please join in and have a go!

 

Many of us have an almost Pavlovian response to the music of the ice cream van; a collective memory leading to a shared reaction…

First we catch the distinctive trill far in the distance. Suddenly alert, our ears strain to work out the direction of travel. Each time the music stops, we enviously envisage kids – other kids in some other street – jostling at the van’s window. Eventually, the music’s increasing volume announces the van’s approach; our turn has come. It’s time to beg money from parents and race out into the street to wait the last few moments… expectantly, eagerly, impatiently. Finally, the ice cream van trundles into sight, greeted by excited whoops and shouted exclamations about which ice creams we want. When our turn at the window comes, we must urgently narrow down our potential choices and settle on just one. Flake 99, Screwball, Orange Split, Funny Feet, Cornetto, Twister, Rocket, Mini Milk, Fab, Calippo, Lemonade Lolly or, in later years, Solero, Feast, Magnum… Order placed, money handed over, we grasp our frozen treasure and walk carefully away, mindful of the time we dropped our bounty and watched it melt forlornly on the pavement. In minutes, we wolf it down and, satiated, return to our play.

IceCreamVan Creative Commons attribute Kenjonbro
Image by Kenjonbro, used under Creative Commons license (attribution, non commercial)

So here’s the challenge – take inspiration from your favourite ice cream van treats for your BSFIC entry this month. Whether you choose to recreate the original faithfully or simply use ice cream van staples  as a starting point for your own creative twists is completely up to you.

Of course, I’ve listed British favourites in my nostalgic prose above, but I want you to draw on your own experiences and memories. Tell me what ice cream vans (or trucks or bikes or carts) were like where you grew up. What did you love to order? How do your memories play into what you have chosen to make?

icecreamvanmenu2 icecreamvanmenu3

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a recipe that fits the challenge by the 28th of September.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • In your post, include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge.
  • Email me (by the 28th of September) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer), the link to your post and an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

If you like, tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC. I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on the Kavey Eats Facebook page.

I’ll post a round up of all the entries at the end of the month.

IceCreamChallenge

For more ideas, check out my my BSFIC Pinterest board and my Pinterest BSFIC Entries board.

 

I don’t know if it’s because of the unrelenting heat these last several weeks, making us yearn for cooling ice creams and sorbets, or because the June & July BSFIC theme of herbs really resonated with you or just that I gave you two months instead of one to send me your posts but I’ve loved the surge of BSFIC entries and am delighted to share this wonderful round up of of posts today. Indeed, some of you have created and blogged not just one herby frozen delight but two… most impressive!

 

bsfic thyme 5

FoodyCat Alicia has never been afraid of creativity, which is how she comes up with ideas like this Goats Cheese, Thyme and Honey Semifreddo. Her recipes seem to be a cunning combination of instinct about what flavours might complement each other and a nod to what’s already in the store cupboard. This unusual ice cream is definitely encouragement to let your imagination run wild and then give it a try!

 

mintchoc julia

Julia prefers her sweets to be sweet and her savouries to be savoury so she went for a traditional combination of Mint Choc Chip Ice Cream, which she made without an ice cream machine. Referencing my easy triple mint choc chip recipe from last year she combined fresh mint with Bendicks in her delicious version.

 

mint cookie dough ice cream 500

Elizabeth also went for mint choc chip but her hers was in the form of Mint Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream. As can often be the case when you develop your own recipes, finished volumes are hard to judge. Elizabeth made too little of her first batch, for which she used a custard base, for the whole family to share, so she quickly made a second batch using a condensed milk and cream base as well. The first needs and ice cream machine, the second doesn’t. Two recipes for the price of one!

 

rosana

Rosanna’s Thyme and Orange Blossom Ice Cream sounds right up my street. A classic custard base with gentle flavours that remind me of our trip to Lebanon a couple of years ago. In her post she also gives a serving suggestion, pairing her ice cream with meringues and chocolate sauce in an exotic sundae. The meringue recipe (provided) is also a great way to use egg whites leftover from the custard recipe.

 

hannah

Hannah starts her post with a hilarious rant about the downsides of summer festivals. The worst of her ire is reserved for one offender – warm drinks! Her Lemon & Thyme Granita, garnished so beautifully with pretty thyme flowers, uses the same classic flavour combination as my later entry (and I almost switched ideas when I saw her post but decided our approaches were different and to just go ahead). Granitas have such a distinct texture compared to sorbets, I must try one myself soon.

 

bsfic mojito 2

Most of us hadn’t even made our frozen concoctions by the time Alicia had sprung into action for a second time with her Mojito Sorbet. This is a dream ticket sorbet for me, as I love mojitos and can readily imagine how well they translate into a frozen version. I love this idea for a simple adults-only frozen cocktail.

 

lemon vodka

Citrus is definitely a thirst quencher in the heat, few more so than lemon. Claire shares her recipe for Lemon, Basil and Vodka Sorbet which she came up with after reading recipes for lemon and basil cake and blackcurrant and vodka sorbet by fellow bloggers. I particularly love her colourful photographs that illustrate her post.

 

Rhubarb Ripple

Choclette dropped me a note to ask whether I considered rose to be a herb for the purpose of the challenge. Although the technical definition specifies herbs as the leaves of plants, I’m with Choclette on this one – I feel that rose fits better within the category of herbs than spices. Our everyday categorisations are so arbitrary anyway… thinking of fruits, vegetables, tomatoes and avocados… Choclette discovered the no-churn condensed milk and cream ice cream base when I ran my condensed milk challenge last year and like me, has become very fond of it. She uses it to great effect here with her pretty Rhubarb, Rose and White Chocolate Ice Cream.

 

viscount mint froyo2

Jerryfishbiscuits has been on a bit of a themed kick of his own lately, sharing recipes for retro biscuit ice creams. Since his previous entries have used a custard base, a condensed milk base and an Angel Delight base, for his Viscount Biscuit Ice Cream he decided to try frozen yoghurt, combining it with buttermilk and a minted sugar syrup. At the last minute, some melted After Eights added a second hit of mint and chocolate.

 

Lavender and Chocolate Semifreddo 1

Christian wants to encourage people to think outside of the box, not only in terms of when they can enjoy ice cream but also what flavours of ice cream they can make. His Lavender & Chocolate Semifreddo is an unusual combination, but lavender has long been used as a flavouring for desserts, and I can imagine it working very well with the creamy custard base.

 

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5122

Next up is my own entry, a Lemon, Limoncello & Thyme Sorbet. Like Hannah I chose the classic lemon and thyme combination but went for a sorbet instead of a granita and added a healthy dose of lemon liqueur to make this an adult-only thirst quencher. The recipe is straightforward, combining a herb-infused sugar syrup with lemon juice and Limoncello and then churning in an ice cream machine to produce a very smooth and aerated sorbet. In the extreme heat, it melted fast, so I just had time to scoop some into my prepared lemon skins and shoot a few photographs before it melted… into my mouth!

 

green tea 500px

Another second entry, this time from Elizabeth with her innovative Green Tea & Shetland Seaweed Ice Cream. Again, one could ask whether green tea and seaweed are actually herbs but given that they’re both the product of plant leaves and used for flavouring and seasoning, I’d definitely say so. Elizabeth’s first try with a condensed milk base wasn’t what she was aiming for, but her second attempt with a custard base was perfect. She also recommends soaking the seaweed before incorporating it.

 

lemoncurd

Last but not least is Julia’s Lemon Curd Ripple Ice Cream with Lemon and Basil Syrup. She found the condensed milk and cream base perfect for this, swirling in thick ripples of lemon curd into the whipped base. She then added a lovely herb accent with her lemon and basil syrup (made with home grown basil), which she drizzled over the ice cream before serving.

 

IceCreamChallenge

I promised to send some herb seeds from my seed box to my favourite posts. Every single entry is great but I’ve picked out two that I really love. Rosanna’s Thyme and Orange Blossom Ice Cream and Elizabeth’s Green Tea & Shetland Seaweed Ice Cream. Ladies, can you email me your postal addresses so I can send you some seeds?

I’ll be posting the next theme shortly. As always, all bloggers (food, lifestyle, personal diarists) are welcome to join in. You don’t have to be an ice cream guru, just have a go and share your ideas and experiences with the rest of us!

 

When I set the latest Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream as herbs, I knew already that I wanted to do a lemon and limoncello sorbet with a herb.

I was recently sent a copy of The Flavour Thesaurus, in which I looked up herbs that might be a good match for lemon. The book was alright… To be honest, I already thought of the obvious pairings before I read it – lemon and thyme, lemon and lavender, lemon and mint, lemon and rosemary. Perhaps it’ll prove more useful when I’m trying to find matches for more unusual ingredients.

I fancied something with an element of savoury to it, so went for Lemon, Limoncello & Thyme.

All the lemon sorbet recipes I could find online are essentially a variation of the same technique (juice the lemons, make a sugar syrup, mix together and freeze) but with wildly differing ratios of each ingredient. So I made up my own recipe according to what felt and tasted right.

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5122

The basic recipe is a doddle so I’ll likely make it again to see how I like the other flavour pairings.

I like the idea of lime, mint and rum Mojito sorbet. And lemon and lavender could be lovely on a hot summer afternoon.

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5093

 

Lemon, Limoncello & Thyme Sorbet

Ingredients
250 ml freshly squeezed lemon juice, strained
150 grams sugar
200 ml water
2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme. plus extra for garnish
50 ml limoncello liqueur

Note: I haven’t specified an exact number of lemons, since the amount of juice you’ll get from each will vary. My 6 small lemons gave me 250 ml of juice.

Method

  • Juice your lemons, reserving the discarded skins. (Tip: I find rolling the lemons firmly on a hard surface before cutting makes it easier to release the juice.)

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5096

  • Gently heat the sugar, water and thyme together until the sugar is fully dissolved.

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5100

  • Add the limoncello to the lemon juice.
  • Add your flavoured sugar syrup to the lemon juice in batches, and taste for sweetness as you go. If you’ve added all the syrup and your mixture is still too sharp, make up some more syrup using the same 3:4 ratio of sugar to water. (It’s hard to judge since some lemons are sweeter and some are much sharper).

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5103

  • If you are happy with the thyme flavour, remove the sprigs of thyme now. Otherwise, leave them in the mix and refrigerate to cool. (If it’s going to be quite some time before you can churn the mixture, you may wish to taste it now and again and remove the thyme when it has infused sufficiently for your tastes).
  • Churn the mixture in an ice cream machine. (Alternatively, you can freeze, removing from the freezer and mixing with a fork at regular intervals).

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5109

  • In the meantime, use a pair of scissors to snip and scrape as much of the membranes from the lemon skins as possible and slice off the very tips to make a flat base so the halves can stand, like cups.

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5116

  • Once the sorbet is churned, you may need to transfer to the freezer for it to solidify a little further.
  • I used the lemon peel cups to serve, with a sprig of fresh thyme as garnish.

LemonThymeLimoncelloSorbet-5121

In the heat of my kitchen, it melted fast! But it was a great reward and I was very happy with how it came out.

This is my entry for the June July BSFIC challenge.

IceCreamChallenge

You still have time to enter, so please do join in!

Jun 072013
 

Last year we did Spices, now it’s time for herbs!

Defined (culinarily) as the leafy green parts of a plant, either fresh or dried, herbs are usually used in small amounts to provide flavour or seasoning. They are distinct from spices, which are most commonly a product of the seeds, berries, roots, bark, flowers and even resins of various plants and also used to flavour and season.

The list of herbs is long indeed and the uses (both culinary and medical) are almost endless. It’s not uncommon for me to come across a reference to yet another herb I’ve never heard of before, let alone seen or tasted.

Lebanon AbuKasem-7493 Lebanon AbuKasem-7444
Za’atar and farmer Abu Kassem, Southern Lebanon

Whether you make something sweet or savoury, whether you create an ice cream, sorbet, granita, slushy, lolly or other frozen treat… make sure it’s all about the herbs!

You can choose a familiar herb such as coriander or mint, parsley, sage, rosemary or thyme, bay, basil, oregano, tarragon, dill or chives…

…or something more unusual such as anise, costmary (mace leaf), lemon balm or verbena, perilla, angelica, sorrel, calamus (sweet sedge), purslane, pennyroyal, sweet cicely, myrtle, lovage, feverfew, stevia, marshmallow or lemongrass…

…or even something completely new to you such as brooklime, greenthread, papalo, tulsi, peppergrass cress, rosella, sculpit, burnet, speedwell or sarsaparilla.

As always, I’ll seek out some inspiration and share it on my Pinterest board.

IceCreamChallenge

 

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a recipe that fits the challenge by the 28th of July.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • In your post, include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge.
  • Email me (by the 28th of July) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer), the link to your post and an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

Entry into the challenge confers permission to use your image in my round up blog post of all entries, as well as related entries on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other social media.

If you like, tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC. I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on the Kavey Eats Facebook page.

 

This isn’t a proper competition, but I will send out a gift of some herb seeds to the author of my favourite entry (as long as the border agency regulations of your country allow it).

 

badge Cooking-with-Herbs-300x252

P.S. Karen at Lavender & Lovage runs a monthly Cooking with Herbs challenge; your herby #BSFIC would be an excellent fit for hers too!

 

I knew when I set May’s #BSFIC theme as Cones & Cups, Biscuits & Baskets, Wafers & Waffles (or indeed, any other edible containers for ice cream) that it was quite a challenge. Lots of choice on what to make, lots of scope for creativity but also lots of potential for things to go wrong.

So I was super impressed with all the entries, below, which I’m sure you’ll agree showcase a fabulous range of ideas!

BasilIceCreamConeChocBSFIC b-0441 IceCreamChallenge

I started things off early with my own post for which I recreated the BSFIC cartoon badge I drew back when I set the first challenge. I used my new review Lakeland Waffle Cone Maker (with lots of help from Pete) to make the cones, made a simple but really delicious basil ice cream to serve in them and melted some dark chocolate to create the drizzle on top.

waffles-griddle-pan

Showing great ingenuity in the face of no waffle maker, Gary from Big Spud made Waffles on a George Foreman Grill. He paired them with some Ben & Jerry’s Winter Berry Brownie for a fruity chocolatey hit. Great proof that you don’t need to fill your kitchen with gadgets to be creative in the kitchen, a lesson I’ve not yet truly accepted!

photo 16

Julia from Food Blog London initially thought about making stroopwafels (keep your eyes open for an upcoming post of mine, Julia!) but decided in the end to combine the new challenge with the recent Baked Alaska theme. Her Waffle, Blueberry Sorbet and Meringue dessert may not have looked as pretty as she hoped, but it did look pretty darn tasty! I like the idea of using a waffle instead of a cake as the base for a baked alaska, and the sorbet sounds so refreshing.

photo

Now if you want to talk about thinking outside the box, blue sky thinking, pushing the envelope or, as us normal people call it, originality then look no further than Hannah of Corner Cottage Bakery’s Strawberry Jelly Ice Cream Bowls. And of course, she didn’t use the ready made cubes of jelly like yours truly would have – she made beautiful delicately pink jelly from real strawberries and served it with vanilla ice cream. A totally grown up twist on a childhood classic.

coffee_hazlenut

Julia from Something Missing had an ice cream crisis recently. She ran out of ice cream! Now that just won’t do… so a root around her store cupboard revealed just the ingredients to make a tasty Frappuccino ice cream using Ferrero Rocher, coffee and a condensed milk base. For her edible Hazelnut Chocolate Bowls, she used Nutella and ground hazelnuts for a gluten-free bake. I love the pretty shape of the bowls!

DSC_0799

Asbestos fingered Jennie from All The Things I Eat made cute little cones, using a David Lebovitz recipe. These she then turned into nifty Cornettos by filling with vanilla condensed milk ice cream and coating with chocolate and chopped toasted hazelnuts. It’s hard not to sing like a Gondolier at these beauties!

Brandysnapbasket

After throwing down the gauntlet to me to try making ice cream cones out of crushed popcorn, Gill from Pigling Bland decided to make Brandy Snap Baskets with Banana Ice Cream. She added a little desiccated coconut to a Mary Berry recipe for the brandy baskets and combined frozen bananas and condensed milk to make a base ice cream to which she added vanilla and chocolate.

bsfic pb&j3

Foodycat’s Alicia shocked herself silly when she realised, after much Googling, that her idea was indeed so original she couldn’t find any evidence of anyone having done the same before. Having often thought of a new idea myself, only to discover that many others have had just the same inspiration before me, I know well how rare this actually is! Keen to represent the flavours of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, Alicia made Raspberry Choux Profiteroles filled with Peanut Butter Ice Cream. I’ve never encountered flavoured choux pastry before and love the idea!

 

With such wide-ranging and creative entries, I really struggled to pick a winner, and turned to Pete to help me make the final pick. Between us, we selected Hannah from Corner Cottage Bakery to win the prize – a Waffle Cone Maker, kindly provided by Lakeland. We loved her clever take on ice cream cups; and such a pretty and summery post too.

Hannah, drop me a line with your postal address and I’ll send it on to Lakeland straight away! Congratulations!

 

I’m a bit late posting the new Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream challenge, so I’ll make it a two month theme again. I’ll announce that one soon!

 

IceCreamChallenge BasilIceCreamConeChocBSFIC b-0441

Back when I launched #BSFIC I drew the cartoon for the challenge badge, featuring a scoop of green ice cream, drizzled with chocolate and served in a waffle cone. I’ve never been a good artist so I was rather pleased with my efforts! Since then, it’s presided over more than 14 challenges.

When I set May’s challenge as edible Cones & Cups, Biscuits & Baskets, Wafers & Waffles – in short, edible ice cream containers – I knew I wanted to try and recreate my little sketch in real life.

For the green ice cream, I considered matcha, avocado, pistachio, and several herbs including mint and rosemary but in the end, settled on basil (recipe below), an ice cream flavour I first encountered on holiday in Islay in 2006.

 

Waffle Cones

Lakeland stepped in to send me a review sample of their Waffle Cone Maker (and are kindly giving away a second one as a prize for the best entry to this month’s challenge).

Pete did all the work creating the cones, which was fairly straightforward but slower than we’d anticipated. He made the batter according to the recipe in the instructions booklet and got to work. After preheating the waffle cone maker, he poured some of the thick batter onto the lower plate, closed the lid and waited for the waffle to cook. We had the temperature set to its highest, but it was still slow. Each waffle took about 5 minutes to cook through – twice the 2-3 minutes instructed. As soon as they had a little colour, Pete used the plastic mould provided to form the pliable waffles into cones before they cooled and hardened.  When we tried to give them a little more colour, they hardened too fast for Pete to wrap them around the cone, which is a shame as I thought the darker ones prettiest. A couple weren’t cooked enough and never hardened, but we found we could put them back into the waffle cone maker and cook them a little more. A hint of brown was the best compromise between appearance and being able to form cones easily.

WaffleConeStroopwafel-0410 WaffleConeStroopwafel-0412
WaffleConeStroopwafel-0418 WaffleConeStroopwafel-0419WaffleConeStroopwafel-0413 WaffleConeStroopwafel-0415WaffleConeStroopwafel-0417 WaffleConeStroopwafel-0421
WaffleConeStroopwafel-0424 WaffleConeStroopwafel-0423

 

Basil Ice Cream

Regular readers of Kavey Eats will know that I am not one to insist that everything always has to be from scratch. Instead of making custard, and steeping the basil in it as it cooked, I used a good quality fresh ready made custard and added fresh basil, blitzed with a little sugar to help it grind more easily.

The flavour of the basil came through clearly and the touch of extra sweetness from the sugar was welcome too – when making custard for ice cream, I make it a touch sweeter than for serving warm, as flavours are always muted a touch by freezing.

This is a lovely, summery ice cream and a nice alternative to fresh mint.

Ingredients
500 grams good quality fresh custard
20 grams fresh basil leaves
2 teaspoons sugar

Note: This ice cream freezes very solid. Add a tablespoon or two of vodka to make it softer after freezing.

Method

  • Process the basil leaves and sugar together to form a paste. I used my Cuisinart Spice and & Nut Grinder for this.
  • In a blender, combine the custard and the basil paste and blitz until smooth.
  • Pour into your ice cream maker, and churn according to the instructions.

Basil IceCream-0353 Basil IceCream-0355
Basil IceCream-0363 Basil IceCream-0364
Basil IceCream-0369 Basil IceCream-0368

 

Assembly + Chocolate Drizzle

Finally, it was time to assemble my homage to the #BSFIC drawing.

Pete came to my rescue in carving out a nice round scoop from the very solid ice cream. (Next time I’ll add a tablespoon of vodka to the mix before churning, to give it a little softness once frozen). We chose the darkest waffle cone, as it was the best match to my cartoon cone. I melted a few squares of Divine 85% dark chocolate in the microwave and drizzled it over the ice cream.

My only regret is not posing it in front of Pete’s maroon T-shirt instead of our white card backdrop for an even better match!

BasilIceCreamConeChocBSFIC b-0438 IceCreamChallenge

 

If you’re thinking about taking part in Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream, the theme this month is edible Cones & Cups, Biscuits & Baskets, Wafers & Waffles and all bloggers from anywhere in the world are welcome to enter!

Don’t forget there’s a prize for best entry this month – Lakeland have given me a second waffle cone maker to give away. (T&C on the challenge page, above).

 

The May Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream challenge is all about edible ice cream containers. So much so that you can opt to fill your home-made cones, cups, biscuits, baskets, wafers and waffles with your favourite ready-made ice cream (or sorbet) if you don’t have the time or energy to make your own, this month. Of course, home-made is always welcome in BSFIC!

bsfic japan 5
Foodycat’s green tea ice cream in a sesame snap bowl, for October’s Japan themed BSFIC

As soon as this theme formed in my mind, I knew I wanted to recreate the waffle ice cream cone (with scoop of green ice cream and drizzle of chocolate sauce) that I drew for the BSFIC icon, below. That’s the point at which I realised I’d need a waffle cone maker and turned to my friends at Lakeland.

They sell this Montiss Waffle Cone Maker (£29.99), which provides a quick and simple way of making slim textured waffles. Just pre-heat the appliance, pour batter onto the cooking plate, close the lid, and allow to cook for a couple of minutes. You can adjust the temperature to suit your recipe. To turn waffles into waffle cones, lift the hot pliable waffles from the press and quickly wrap them around the cone-shaped form provided. The casing is made of durable bakelite and the cooking plates are non-stick, so should be easy to wipe clean with a damp cloth.

New Waffle Cone Maker, Ref 17162, £29.99 New Waffle Cone Maker, Ref 17162, £29.99_3

To my delight, Lakeland not only offered me a review sample of the waffle cone maker, so I can make the ice cream cones of my dreams (and then give homemade stroopwafel a try), but very kindly agreed to give a second one away to the winning entry from this month’s challenge!

IceCreamChallenge_thumb1

 

How To Take Part In BSFIC

  • Create and blog a recipe that fits the challenge by the 4th of June.
  • In your post, mention and link to this Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream post.
  • In your post, include the Bloggers Scream For Ice Cream badge.
  • Email me (by the 4th of June) with your first name or nickname (as you prefer), the link to your post and an image for my roundup, sized to no larger than 500 pixels on the longest side.

You are welcome to submit your post to as many blogger challenge events as you like.

If the recipe is not your own, please be aware of copyright issues. Email me if you would like to discuss this.

If you like, tweet about your post using the hashtag #BSFIC. I’ll retweet any I see. You are also welcome to share the links to your posts on the Kavey Eats Facebook page.

I’ll post a round up of all the entries at the end of the month.

 

About The Competition

  • Valid entry into the May 2013 BSFIC (as above) will be considered entry into the competition for the Lakeland Waffle Cone Maker. (If for any reason, you don’t wish to enter, please advise in your email).
  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT 4th June 2013.
  • We will select a favourite entry from those submitted. We will be looking for an entry that meets the challenge theme well and a post that is engagingly written, attractively presented and provides easy-to-follow instructions.
  • The prize is a Lakeland Waffle Cone Maker and includes delivery to a UK mainland address only. (Those outside the UK are welcome to enter and nominate a friend’s UK address for delivery).
  • The prize cannot be redeemed for cash.
  • The prize is offered directly by Lakeland.
  • The winner will be notified by email. If no response is received within 14 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Edit: 23 May 2013 – please note that the deadline for this month’s  BSFIC has been extended from the 28th May to the 4th June.

 

For more ideas, check out my Pinterest Ice Cream Inspiration board and my Pinterest BSFIC Entries board.

With thanks to Lakeland for providing sample and prize waffle cone makers.

 

Baked Alaskas are a little intimidating. This challenge garnered quite a few comments from those who loved the idea but were too nervous to give it a try. The response, from those of us who gave it a go, is that Baked Alaskas are not as complicated as they seem nor as prone to failure as we worried they’d be. The effort is worth the reward of these magical hot cold desserts.

 

photo

Hannah from Corner Cottage Bakery was the bravest of all of us, I think. Testing her theory of which foods make sense on sticks (in the current cake pops, pie pops style) she created crazy fabulous Coconut Baked Alaska Pops. She added coconut to a Genoise sponge recipe, made a creamy coconut ice cream, sandwiched the two together around a lollipop stick and dipped to coat in a thick layer of Italian meringue. A blow torch finished things off. I’m not usually a pops kind of person, but I think this idea is wonderful!

 

CheatChocCherryBakedAlaska-0195

Suffering from a nasty cold that wouldn’t shift and several weeks of poor sleep, I came up with a Cheat’s Chocolate Cherry Baked Alaska as a way of joining in without making cake or ice cream. I combined shop-bought dense chocolate loaf cake, Morello cherry jam and Belgian chocolate ice cream, smothered them in a regular meringue mix and baked in the oven for a few minutes. To my delight, the meringue browned up and the ice cream stayed frozen inside. Result!

 

raspberrybakedalaska

Back to proper home-made efforts with Julia from Food Blog London’s vibrant Raspberry Almond Baked Alaska. For her base, she made a raspberry almond cake, which she topped with home made raspberry sorbet. Once covered with meringue, she baked in a hot oven. Julia mentioned that her sorbet leaked in a few places, and soaked into the sponge a little and we are wondering whether that was down to sorbet melting faster than ice cream, lack of a layer of jam between cake and sorbet or the need for a thicker insulating layer of meringue? Feedback welcome!

 

claire

Claire from Under The Blue Gum Tree already knows that her honey and ginger combination is a winner, and used it again to great effect in her Honey and Ginger Baked Alaska. She made her delicious sticky gingerbread for the base, topped it with home-made honeycomb ice cream and put on the insulating meringue before a quick stint in a hot oven. Doesn’t it look beautiful?

 

jennie

I think it’s safe to say that most of us who took part this month had never before made a Baked Alaska. But Jennie from Things I Eat had never even eaten one, so her Lemony Baked Alaska was a double first! She used madeira cake for her base, made a condensed milk and yoghurt ice cream with lemon curd swirled through, added more lemon curd between cake and ice cream and topped with Italian meringue. I think it’s safe to say she really enjoyed the sensation of a dessert that was both hot and cold at the same time!

 

IceCreamChallenge mini

Huge thanks to all who participated. I hope you enjoyed your Baked Alaskas!

Look out for May’s #BSFIC challenge, coming soon and with a fantastic prize to be won for the best entry.

© 2006 - 2014 Kavita Favelle Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha