kaveyeats

 

I adore dessert wines. The syrupy liquid nectar is too sweet for some, but I truly love the intensity of flavour that the best dessert wines bring to the glass.

Some of my favourites are produced by noble rot, the action of Botrytis cinerea, a fungal mould that causes infected grapes to partially shrivel, raisin-like, on the vine. This concentrates the sugars, resulting in a delightfully sweet wine, though of course, far more grapes are required to produce a bottle than for regular wine. French Sauterne, Hungarian Tokaji and German and Austrian Beerenauslese are all made in this way.

But there is another method that produces similarly sweet results and that is ice wine. Here, the grapes are left on the vine until a cold snap freezes them – of course it’s mainly the water content that freezes, rather than the sugars and other solids within the grape. Pressing while still frozen means that only a small volume of sweet and concentrated juice is extracted, with the water left behind as ice. This is a tricky wine to produce since the vintner must hope for the right weather conditions to grow healthy grapes, and then for a suitable cold snap during which to harvest. Harvesting is usually done by hand, on the first morning it’s cold enough, and there’s a brief 6 hour window during which the entire harvest must be picked and pressed. For this reason, ice wine is not produced in great quantities, and there are only a few regions with the requisite climate to do so. Canada and Germany are the world’s largest producers; with the majority of Canada’s ice wine being produced in Ontario.

During my visit to the region last year, I enjoyed visits to a number of vineyards in the Niagara-on-the-Lake area. Of course, all these wineries produce regular red, white and rosé wines as well as their sweet ice wines, so they are well worth a visit even if ice wine is not for you.

 

Two Sisters Vineyard

Two Sisters Vineyard is the first one we visited, on a balmy early-autumn evening, the sun casting a golden blanket across the beautiful stonework of the vineyard, and the fields of vines surrounding it. We ate our dinner on the terrace, probably my favourite menu of the vineyard restaurants we visited. Kitchen 76 offers rustic Italian food at its best – superb fresh ingredients cooked and served simply but skillfully to bring out their inherent flavours.

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For starters, we shared pizzas, salads and charcuterie boards laden with locally made meats, cheeses and breads.

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For mains, superb pastas – the rabbit ragu pappardelle was a winner, plates of lamb chops with guanciale potatoes and a ribeye steak topped with a potato croquette that was to die for.

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Vineland Estates Winery

Three of us really arrived in style to our lunch at the Vineland Estates Winery, dropped off by the helicopter that had just given us spectacular aerial views of the Niagara Falls. (The rest of our party went by road, a beautiful drive in its own right).

Lunch was served on the outdoor terrace, a perfect spot in the gorgeous sunshine. Of course, there are plenty of tables inside, for when the weather is less amenable!

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From a wine perspective, this was hands-down the best meal for me; Vineland Estates produce not one but several different dessert wines, some made with late harvest grapes and some ice wines. I was served a flight of delicious sweet wines throughout my meal, switching between wine types, grape varieties and years of harvest. It was a wonderful opportunity to identify the flavour profiles of the grapes, not to mention the difference that weather makes, year on year.

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Food was again excellent. A very different style to Two Sisters, but very similarly focused on the superb quality local ingredients. I particularly enjoyed Chef Justin Downes’ home-cured charcuterie and home-made rillettes, patés, pickles and chutneys.

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These were followed by an incredible smoked tomato bisque, perfectly cooked beef top sirloin served with cauliflower puree, mustard jus and some blue haze blue cheese. After, a New York cheesecake with brandy-marinated necatines, blueberry gelato and crushed pstachios. Everything was stunningly plated and suitably delicious.

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The one I bought a bottle of was a delicious classic Vidal ice wine, 2014.

 

Inniskillin Winery

Inniskillin Winery was the only brand I was already familiar with, having come across it’s ice wine in the UK. Founded by Donald Ziraldo and Karl Kaiser back in 1975, the name comes from the Irish Regiment to which one Colonel Cooper belonged in the 1800s; Cooper was the previous owner of the farm where the vineyard was established.

Unlike the other wineries we visited, Inniskillin don’t have an onsite restaurant. But they did organise for chef Tim MacKiddie to cook us a multi-course meal to enjoy with their wines, served in one of the spacious private rooms at the winery.

Before and during dinner we were talked through the wines by the enthusiastic and hugely knowledgeable Sumie Yamakawa, Inniskillin’s Visitor Experience Manager.

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The wine that absolutely floored me here was the incredible sparkling Vidal ice wine, 2014 vintage, and this is the Inniskillin bottle I purchased to bring home. This is truly amazing, well worth a try if you can find it!

 

13th Street Winery

Located right next door to Whitty Farms (more of which in a later post), 13th Street Winery is the vision of Doug and Karen Whitty and their friends John and June Mann, but the man behind the wines is Frenchman Jean Pierre Colas, formerly the head winemaker at the Domaine Laroche in Chablis for 10 years, during which time he produced many award-winning wines.

First into our glasses is a sparkling rosé blend of pinot noir and chardonnay plus a little gamay to add a deeper colour and more fruitiness to the flavour. The colour and sparkles are beguiling and the others in the group confirm, for those with less of a sweet tooth than mine, that it’s delicious.

During our tasting Jean Pierer explains that red gamay is the flagship wine of 13th Street, though of course, they produce other wines too. Having worked in Beaujolais as a student, gamay was a grape he knows how to handle and it grows well here in Niagara; “there is something unique in Ontario that allows us to produce crazy, beautiful, strong, charming gamays”. And gamay is also a wine that is made for food, as the pastry with basil, tomato and Grey Owl blue cheese helps us to confirm.

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13th Street are one of the only wineries in the area not producing ice wine. As Jean Pierre puts it, “we don’t have to be like everybody, we don’t have to do like everybody”. I ask him why and he quips that he has “no interest to pick grapes in the winter and to freeze my arse outside!”

After the gamay, we try 13 Below Zero, a sweet riesling with far less residual sugar than ice wine. With my super sweet tooth, they’re still too acidic for my liking, but are much-liked by the others in my group.

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The owners’ love of art is shared via a selection of modern pieces hung within the winery’s main building and displayed in the beautifully planted gardens just outside.

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Hopefully I’ve given you a taste of the Niagara-on-the-Lake region’s excellent wineries, and especially the ice wine that many of them produce.

It’s a perfect destination for a self-drive holiday, with plenty to see and do, many charming independent hotels and bed and breakfasts, and some truly world class eating and drinking to enjoy, both at the wineries themselves and in the area’s many top quality restaurants.

Kavey Eats visited Ontario as a guest of Destinations Canada. With additional thanks to Anna and Michael Olson for being our hosts, and Diane Helinski for being our tour manager and guide.

 

A few days ago I shared my review of Grow Your Own Cake, published by Frances Lincoln. Click through to read more and to enter my giveaway to win your own copy of the book.

This intriguing cookbook features 46 recipes for savoury and sweet cakes and bakes featuring vegetables and fruits you can grow yourself. The author Holly Farrell, an experienced gardening writer, shares invaluable tips on how to grow and harvest each crop, before putting it to use in the recipe provided. Photography is by Jason Ingram, who illustrates both gardening tips and recipes throughout the book.

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Book jacket; sweet potato image by Jason Ingram

Pete and I have thus far made two recipes from the book, an Upside-down Pear Cake and this Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake, published below with permission from Frances Lincoln. I love the idea of taking a combination associated with American Thanksgiving menus and turning it into a cake.

We weren’t sure what to expect from this cake – in taste, in texture, in appearance. To our surprise the crumb is actually fairly light and not overly sweet, in fact it’s a lovely gently flavoured sponge which would work very well on it’s own, without the ganache filling or marshmallow fluff topping. We over-baked by just a few minutes, which gave the outside a slightly darker colour, but it didn’t affect the taste at all.

I am not sure adding mini marshmallows into the batter serves much purpose – as the cake cooks they seem to melt away leaving odd pockets in the sponge, lined with a crunchy sugar glaze – so I might skip those next time. The sweet potato cake is the real winner in this recipe, and you could lose the marshmallow elements if you wanted to and serve it as a simple unadorned sponge.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats (2)

Sweet Potato & Marshmallow Cake

If sweet potato & marshmallow casserole, the traditional Thanksgiving dish, is too sweet for your turkey dinner, use this great pairing in cake form instead. It is perfect after a long winter’s walk.

Makes a two-layer cake

Ingredients

Mashed sweet potatoes
800–900g/1lb 12oz–2lb sweet potatoes

Cake
400g/14oz plain flour
11⁄2 tbsp baking powder
3⁄4 tsp salt
1⁄4 tsp black pepper
1⁄2 nutmeg, finely grated, or 1⁄2 tsp ground nutmeg
165g/51⁄2oz unsalted butter
250g/8oz light muscovado sugar
4 eggs
450g/1lb mashed sweet potatoes
90g/3oz mini-marshmallows

Ganache
45ml/11⁄2fl oz double cream
100g/3oz white chocolate

Decoration
1⁄2 jar of marshmallow fluff (about 100g/31⁄2oz)
100g/31⁄2oz marshmallows

Equipment
2 × deep, round cake tins, 20cm/8in diameter, greased and base-lined

Method

  • For the mashed sweet potatoes, preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4. Roast the sweet potatoes for around 45 minutes until they are soft. Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely, then pop them out of their skins. Mash well (use a potato ricer if you have one).
  • For the cake, preheat the oven to 170°C/325°F/gas mark 3.

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  • Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper and nutmeg in a bowl and mix well; leave to one side. Beat the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well to incorporate after each egg. Mix in the mashed sweet potato, then the flour and spice mix. Quickly stir in the mini-marshmallows and divide the cake mixture between the two tins. Make sure that all the marshmallows on the surface are coated with mixture to prevent them burning. Bake for 50–60 minutes. To check if it is ready insert a skewer into the cake; if it comes out clean the cake is cooked. Remove from the oven and leave for 10 minutes in the tins, then turn out on to a wire rack to cool completely.

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  • For the ganache, heat the cream in a small saucepan over a medium heat until just under boiling point. Pour over the chocolate and stir until it has melted and is smooth. Leave to cool until the mixture is thick enough to spread without running.

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  • To assemble, sandwich the two cake layers together with the ganache, spread marshmallow fluff on the top and sprinkle with whole marshmallows.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats (1)

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Grow Your Own Cake from Frances Lincoln, part of Quarto Publishing Group UK. Grow Your Own Cake by Holly Farrell, photographs by Jason Ingram is currently available from Amazon for £14.88 (RRP £16.99).

 

It’s not often I visit Kingston-upon-Thames, being based as I am in the wilds of North London. But an invitation to enjoy Ribstock-winning barbeque in a pub not too far from my sister’s house in South London was too tempting to pass up, and on a gloriously sunny day in late March, we made our way down. We drove and parked in the public pay and display just opposite but if you want to take advantage of an impressive beer list and whisky collection, I’d recommend you travel by train to Kingston station, just a couple of minutes walk.

On our arrival, pub licensee Leigh White filled us in. The Grey Horse is now run by the team behind The White Hart Witley, where Sam Duffin installed BBQ Whisky Beer after moving it out of it’s original Marylebone home. The White Hart became well known for its extensive whisky bar, strong craft beer selection, live music and excellent barbeque. And when I say excellent barbeque, I’m not exaggerating – BBQ Whisky Beer won Ribstock 2013, beating the likes of barbeque stars Blue Boar Smokehouse, Carl Clarke of Rotary, Cattle Grid, Neil Rankin, Prairie Fire BBQ, Red Dog Saloon, Roti Chai Street Kitchen, The Rib Man and Tim Anderson of Nanban!

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The same team have now taken over The Grey Horse, which closed in 2014 and has since been extensively refurbished. When it reopened in November last year, the space had been reorganised to provide a traditional pub area to the front, a dining room with open kitchen behind and a live music venue called RamJam Club at the rear. RamJam has its own small kitchen too, so either the pub or guest chefs can cater separately for the club and small outside space.

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The new dining room opened this January and it’s a lovely space. A huge skylight lets in plenty of light, giving an upwards view out to blue sky, grey clouds or perhaps a starry night. Along one side of the room is an open kitchen and along the other a row of tables in a long alcove. At the back, exposed brickwork with a mural of Jimi Hendrix – he played here in the venue’s previous heyday, so it’s said. I’m not a fan of the high tables with stools that take up the central space; a killer for anyone with back or hip probblems – always smacks of style over substance, but that’s the only minus amongst the pluses for me.

The pub area is more traditional albeit with whisky-laden shelves (and board list) that make Pete determined to return without the car before too long!

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As I mentioned, the beer list is appealing. Pete has a half pint of Twickenham Tusk, on draft which he describes as dry with a pleasant floral hoppiness.

For the rest, we stick to soft drinks including a Dalston Cola and a Rocks Ginger and Wasabi. Both excellent and such a nice change from the big brand fizzies.

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We dither so much over which starters to order that we eventually decide on three!

First choice is crab cocktail, charred gem, fried avocado, nduja aioli (£7) and it’s plated in the deconstructed style that’s become so prevalent. Plenty of sweet fresh crabmeat, deliciously charred baby gem lettuces, odd but good-odd crumbed and fried slices of avocado and a generous smear or spicy nduja aioli. Can’t go wrong ordering this one!

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Next is the only meh dish of the meal – fried Ogleshield, pickled wild mushrooms and spinach puree (£6). Inside the deep-fried balls we expect to find gooey melted Ogleshield, a delicious sticky-soft washed-rind cheese by Neals Yard Dairy, but instead the filling is super dry, way too crumbly and lacking in much flavour. The spinach puree is more of a decoration than a key element – a shame as it tastes great. The big redeeming factor is the heap of pickled wild mushrooms which are redolent with red wine vinegariness and sweet shallots.

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Our third and final starter is chicken wings, hot sauce, blue cheese, sesame and celery (£6). Six plump chicken wings are covered in a fiery hot sauce – tingling-on-the-edge-of-burning rather than blow-your-head-off painful. The blue cheese dip is properly cheesy and thick enough to cling generously to dipped wings. The celery I leave for Pete, who praises it’s braised nature – gentle crunch and gentle flavour, nice with the blue cheese dip.

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For my main, how can I not choose Sam’s Ribstock winner, the Jacob’s Ladder beef rib? Available in small, medium or large (£10, £13, £16) I’m surprised at how hefty my £10 rib is and can’t help but laugh at a nearby diner’s look of shock when his large portion is served! Mesquite-smoked and rubbed with Sam’s own spices before being smothered in homemade barbeque sauce the meat is melty-soft inside with perfect char and texture on the surface; the flavour is smoky and beefy, intense and fantastic!

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It’s true, Ribstock totally called it, this barbeque is fantastic and absolutely worth the trek across town! Next time I come, I’m skipping the starters, good as two of them were, and going all in on the smoked ribs three ways (£20) featuring beef rib, pork rib and iberico rib!

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Pete is a sucker for a burger, so he chooses the classic burger (£9) which comes with smoked bacon and American cheese plus lettuce, onion, tomato, dill pickle, burger mayo and ghetto sauce (whatever that may be!) Skinny fries (£3) are extra, or you could order a coal roast sweet potato, dill aioli, black garlic (£4) or house pickles (£3) amongst other sides.

Just three days earlier, Pete and I tasted nine different beef patties (plus burgers made with each of those nine) to help our local pub decide on which to serve in their soon-to-be-upgraded burgers. Three stood out above the other six, of which one was a clear winner – on taste, juiciness and texture.

To Pete’s delight, the patty in this burger is the match of that winner; it has an intense beefiness to the flavour, excellent juiciness and a texture that gives just the right amount of chew without leaving one chewing and chewing like a cow eating cudd! The bun is well chosen, both for flavour and texture, and there is good balance of all the secondary ingredients and condiments.

All in all, this is a top burger!

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By this point, you’d be right in thinking we are quite full. But I always try to order one dessert just to assess a restaurant’s sweet offerings – too many restaurants treat desserts as an afterthought and they don’t always match up to the savoury menu.

I cannot look past the dark chocolate and peanut butter tart, salt caramel ice cream £6), which Pete won’t enjoy because of the peanut. So Pete goes for the cornflake ice cream sundae, dulce du leche and hot fudge sauce (£6).

The sundae first; a classic bowl of ice cream, cream and sauces with the extra crunch and flavour of cornflakes! It’s good and Pete somehow finishes the entire bowl!

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The tart is delicious too; peanut butter chocolate topping over crunchy base and with crushed caramel sprinkle, it’s super rich and fairly sweet – perfectly partnered with a properly salty salted caramel ice cream, which makes a pleasant and surprising change. I only manage half of this but I enjoy every mouthful!

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After all that we’re full to bursting but it’s definitely been worth the bloat – the food has been delicious, and the barbeque rib just phenomenal.

This isn’t our neck of the woods but we’ll definitely be back, as this is way more than just a decent local pub – for barbeque lovers it’s a destination restaurant, well worth the visit wherever you live.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of The Grey Horse.

The Grey Horse Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

 

The premise of using vegetables in cakes is nothing new – carrot cake has been a well known favourite as long as I can remember, chocolate and beetroot cakes and brownies have gained popularity in the last decade and more recently courgette cakes are stretching peoples’ definitions of what a cake can be made with.

For me, it goes much further than that, as I’ve long been a huge fan of fellow blogger Kate Hackworthy who writes the much-loved and respected blog Veggie Desserts. As the blog name and tagline suggest, the recipes Kate develops and shares are all about using vegetables in ‘cakes, bakes, breakfasts and meals’ and Kate has won much recognition for the innovation of her recipes, and the stunning photographs with which she illustrates them. You’ll find everything from cookies featuring romanesco cauliflower, cupcakes featuring cucumber, peas or spinach, and cakes full of celeriac, kale and swede! So when I first heard about a cookery book focusing on vegetable- and fruit-based cakes I was already primed for these kind of recipes!

growyourowncake

However, publisher Frances Lincoln have taken a different slant for this new title and teamed up with established gardening author Holly Farrell (who has written multiple books on kitchen gardening and contributed to a range of gardening magazines) and Jason Ingram (a garden and food photographer). Holly is also a keen baker, and in Grow Your Own Cake, she treats the garden as a larder for her baking, providing not only recipes but advice on how to grow the main crop featured in each one.

The recipes range from savoury to sweet, using both fruit and vegetables from the plot, with detailed and well-illustrated guidance for the novice gardener looking to grow some of their own produce in their garden or allotment.

There are fifty recipes in the book; some are already classics, such as the carrot cake and beetroot brownies I mention above. Others such as fennel cake and pea cheesecake are more unusual. Recipes are organised somewhat seasonally, with the first chapter covering spring and summer cakes and the second autumn and winter ones. Next come afternoon tea ideas, puddings and savoury bakes.

Many of the recipes are appealing and I’m waiting eagerly for the main ingredients to come into season in our allotment, rather than buying from the supermarket out of season. I’d like to try the rose cake (featuring home made rose water), the parsnip winter cake (ours didn’t survive the slugs so none for us this winter) and the tomato cupcakes, to name a few.

Photography is lovely – pretty and practical without being overly fussy in the styling, a little old school but comfortingly so. My only complaint on this front is that while there are plenty of photographs of the gardening element of the book, there aren’t as many food images as I’d like to see – it’s frustrating not to have a picture of the finished dish for many of the recipes, especially when they are unfamiliar – what kind of colour do the tomato cupcakes have, for example and how should the icing for the sweet potato and marshmallow cake look? A few more images on the food side would be a huge help.

Thus far, Pete and I have made two recipes from the book, the Upside-down Pear Cake and the Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake; both have worked well, though the lack of photographs has made it feel a little more of a shot in the dark, even with Holly’s fairly clear instructions. Most importantly, both were delicious, and I’d happily make and eat both again.

I have permission to share the Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake recipe with you, so keep your eyes peeled for that in an upcoming post.

Sweet Potato and Marshmallow Cake on Kavey Eats (1)

In the meantime, here’s an opportunity for you to win your own copy of this lovely book:

GIVEAWAY

Frances Lincoln are offering two copies of Grow Your Own Cake for a Kavey Eats reader giveaway. Each prize includes delivery to UK addresses.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
What kind of fruit or vegetable have your tried in cakes and what did you think?

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow both @Kavey on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win Grow Your Own Cake published by @Frances_Lincoln from Kavey Eats! http://bit.ly/KaveyEatsGYOC #KaveyEatsGYOC
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle to the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

RULES, TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 6th May 2016.
  • The two winners will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • Each prize is a copy of Grow Your Own Cake by Holly Farrell and Jason Ingram, published by Frances Lincoln. Delivery to UK addresses is included.
  • The prizes are offered by Frances Lincoln and cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, entrants must be following @Kavey at the time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check relevant accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Grow Your Own Cake from Frances Lincoln, part of Quarto Publishing Group UK.
Grow Your Own Cake by Holly Farrell, photographs by Jason Ingram is currently available from Amazon for £14.88 (RRP £16.99).

 

If you don’t know Kingly Court in Soho, you’d be forgiven for not realising it’s there. An open space between buildings fronting onto Ganton Street to the North, Carnaby Street to the East, Beak Street to the South and Kingly Street to the West, this tiny enclave has become a bustling food hub with over twenty restaurants, bars and cafes crammed into its small area.

On the second floor, looking out over the open court space, is Señor Ceviche. This funky and colourful restaurant and cocktail bar is modelled on the vibe of Barranco, an increasingly bohemian district of Lima that is home to artists, musicians and designers and full of charming boutiques and lively restaurants and bars.

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At the back of the room is the open kitchen and to one side the bar. Decor is eclectic, with pattern-painted wooden floors, wooden panels on some of the walls and colourful posters on the others. The industrial-style ceiling has been left uncovered, as is increasingly common these days. Some beautiful traditional tiling finishes the charmingly mish-mash look.

The food is fun too, with colourful dishes based on Peruvian streetfood. As is only fitting, a few of the dishes showcase Japanese flavours too; Peruvian cuisine has been much influenced by Nikkei immigration in the last century and this fusion of traditions is prevalent in Peru.

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Of course, there’s a great cocktail list with several Pisco-based options. Pete has a straight Pisco Sour (£8.50), also available in passion fruit, lemongrass, spiced pineapple and strawberry flavours. I enjoy my tall Ayahuasca (£9) – a blend of rum, peach liqueur, spiced pineapple syrup and ginger beer.

The vibe is relaxed, with upbeat music playing, but not so loud that you can’t chat to your friends as you eat.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8440

The menu is split into several sections and staff advise ordering around 3 dishes per person from across the menu.

From Para Picar we choose Aubergine picarones (£6), sweet potato and aubergine doughnuts with aioli and roasted peanuts. I love the sweet potato batter but the aubergine inside is bland and the aioli lacks punch too. The sweet potato is definitely the saving grace of the dish though, and makes it a thumbs up rather than a so so.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8446

The Sanguchitos (sandwiches) section is short and sweet but we’re keen to try one so we choose Atun (£5.50). The small brioche bun is filled with seared tuna in a miso and honey glaze, with spring onion, cucumber and tarragon mayo and it’s gorgeous! Definitely order one per person as the juiciness of the filling means it disintegrates fast and isn’t easy to hand over; not that you’ll want to share anyway!

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8443

Part of me feels that we ought to choose Senor Ceviche (£9) from the Ceviche & Tiradito section, named as it is for the restaurant itself. But Pete’s not a fan of octopus or squid so we order Mr Miyagi (£7) instead – salmon with tiger’s milk (the colloquial name given to the dressing of fish juices and citrus), pomegranate, purple shiso and salmon scratchings and we’re not sorry. Soft, slippery salmon pairs perfectly with its dressing, and the pomegranate, shisho and crispy salmon skin add sweetness, herb and crunch.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8448

It’s the Peruvian Barbecue section of the menu I find hardest to resist.

First we have the Anticucho de res (£7), two skewers of thinly cut and folded beef heart grilled and served with a crunchy red salad, a vivid sweet potato mayonnaise and a little tapenade-like pile of olives, aji panca (chilli pepper) and mint. I love these skewers; not too chewy and with a mere hint of offal flavour, the beef heart is smoky from the grill and nicely balanced by the garnishes. Pete agrees it’s not too awful for offal but leaves the majority of it to me.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8453 Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-131826

I do like the flavour of the crusted marinade on the Pachamanca pork ribs (£9) but they’ve been cooked too long, resulting in a thicker blackened crust and more lingering burnt flavour than is ideal; a little char is wonderful but too much just tastes of soot! Under the very thick crust, the meat is nicely cooked and the herbs, spring onions and coriander scattered over the top bring a little freshness back. Grilled a few minutes less I think this dish would be a winner.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8456

As it’s name implies, Super pollo (£8) is super, one of my favourite dishes of the meal. The marinated and grilled chicken is superbly moist, and here the charring is just right to add flavour without overwhelming the dish. The red pepper sauce and piquillo pepper salsa are spot on. The only thing I would change about this dish is to suggest better filleting of the meat – too many lumps of cartilage to spit out for my liking.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8454

From Sides & Salads we choose the Frijoles negros (£4), black beans cooked with smoked bacon, burnt aubergine, aji panca, pineapple and sour cream. I can’t really detect the pineapple but the overall flavour is lovely, though in retrospect I think one of the salads may have been a better match for the other dishes we chose.

Senor Ceviche on Kavey Eats-8462

We’re a little full really to have anything from the Postre (dessert) section but agree to share a portion of Tres Leches (£5). I’m glad we do as this modern take on the traditional cake features a delightfully light and moist chocolate sponge, pisco syrup, white chocolate and saffron cream and dulce de leche ice cream. A lovely dish to finish a vibrant and enjoyable lunch.

The bill, with a coffee added, is £61.50 before service, so about £30 a head and we’ve certainly been a little greedy – we would have been perfectly full and contented with one or two fewer dishes!

The food and atmosphere here is lovely, and the place is busy during our weekday lunchtime visit. I’d recommend planning in advance and booking a table, especially if you’re coming in a group for an evening meal. During the weekday, you may be able to wing it, especially if you avoid the weekday lunch rush and pop in for an early or late lunch.

Kavey Eats dined as guests of Señor Ceviche.

Señor Ceviche Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato
Square Meal

 

PARTNEREDPOSTFor the last few weeks my mind has been firmly on comforting, one-pot dishes using lamb and beef. We produce really excellent quality meat in the UK and it’s a pleasure to cook dishes that make the most of it.

I recently shared a tasty beef goulash recipe that uses shin of beef, a very affordable cut. I love this kind of stewing cut – long slow cooking can be so convenient, allowing us to put a dish in the oven earlier in the day and come home to a delicious meal later on; it also turns a cheaper cut into something utterly delicious – it’s an almost magical transformation! My favourite cut of beef for this kind of cooking is beef cheek (also known as ox cheek); it becomes so tender after a few hours of cooking and has such a wonderful flavour.

Check out my guide to which cuts of beef are best for which type of dish or cooking method.

For today’s recipe, I decided to splurge a little on a half leg of lamb, which currently costs less than £10 a kilo at most supermarkets and generously feeds four.

This one pot dish is very straightforward to make; it’s comforting yet a little different to the typical stew, and smells absolutely gorgeous too. The red wine and balsamic vinegar give a wonderful flavour which is just so good with lamb, a genius combination that I learned from Genevieve Taylor in her book, Stew!, published a few years ago.

Leg of Lamb and Pearl Barley Braised in Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegar on Kavey Eats (2)

Leg of Lamb & Pearl Barley Braised in Red Wine & Balsamic Vinegar

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 kilo half leg of lamb on the bone
5-6 medium white onions, peeled and quartered
2 heaped teaspoons crushed garlic
1 heaped teaspoon dried rosemary
350 ml red wine
150 ml balsamic vinegar
vegetable oil
150 g pearl barley
250 ml water

Leg of Lamb and Pearl Barley Braised in Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegar on Kavey Eats -8471

Method

  • Preheat oven to 150°C.
  • Measure wine and balsamic vinegar into a measuring jug and set aside.
  • In a large casserole dish that can also be used on the stove, heat a little vegetable oil, then brown the lamb on all sides. Remove the lamb from the dish and set aside on a plate.

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  • Add more oil only if needed, then cook the quartered onions in the same dish until some of the edges char to brown, stirring occasionally. The wedges usually break into one or two pieces during this stage.

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  • Add the garlic and rosemary to the onions, stir well and then place the browned lamb over the top.

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  • Pour the wine and vinegar mix into the casserole dish, over the lamb and onions.

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  • Place a lid over the lamb and put into the oven.
  • After two hours, take the dish out of the oven.

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  • Add the pearl barley and water and stir well. It may be easier to remove the lamb first and then put it back in after you’ve added the barley and water. Turn the lamb other side up, to allow the rest of it to submerge in the cooking liquid.

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  • Return to the oven for a further hour, removing the lid for the final 15 minutes.

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  • At this stage, the pearl barley should be plump and cooked through, and the lamb will come away from the bone easily with a fork or spoon.

Leg of Lamb and Pearl Barley Braised in Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegar on Kavey Eats-8522

  • Serve with some fresh green salad or green vegetables.

Note: If you’d like to make this recipe without the pearl barley, omit both pearl barley and the water that is added with it. Do stir and turn the lamb over at that same point, and if the volume of liquid remaining is high, remove the lid for the final 30 minutes instead of 15.

Simply Beef and Lamb is a division of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board. It supports the Red Tractor Mark and the Quality Standard Mark which provide consumers with confidence in what they are buying. The Red Tractor Mark covers food safety, animal safety, traceability and environmental impact. The Quality Standard Mark, as its name suggests, is all about the quality of the meat itself, and requires that all beef and lamb awarded the mark meets very high standards throughout the food chain, from farm through to meat counter.

Leg of Lamb and Pearl Barley Braised in Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegar on Kavey Eats (1)

This post is part of Simply Beef and Lamb’s #LivePeasant campaign, encouraging us to embrace a more rustic approach to cooking, and to think about traditional recipes using beef and lamb.

You may also enjoy these #LivePeasant recipes by fellow bloggers:

This post is a paid commission for Simply Beef and Lamb and part of their #LivePeasant campaign. Visit their website for more great beef and lamb recipes and detailed nutritional information.

 

You might be wondering why I’m sharing chocolate eggs with you now, on Good Friday, when it’s a little late to get your hands on them in time? But the good news is that Brownie Heaven sell their amazing eggs all year round, so if you didn’t get the egg of your dreams this Easter, why not make up for it by ordering one of these beauties for yourself?!

I’ve been seeing a few of these brownie-coated egg creations recently but Brownie Heaven have been making them since 2010 and believe they are the original brownie egg baker! Their Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs are made by wrapping a Cadbury’s Creme Egg, Cadbury’s Caramel Egg or Ferrero Rocher in a thick layer of chocolate brownie mixture and baking it in an egg shape. The Creme egg ones are dusted in biscuit crumbs, the Caramel egg version are coated in salty pretzels and the Ferrero Rocher eggs are coated in crushed Ferrero Rocher chocolates.

Brownie Heaven’s range also includes regular brownies, not just plain chocolate ones but a riot of flavours including Chocolate Chilli, Cognac Truffle, Dr Pepper flavour, Irish Whiskey, Milk Chocolate Chip, Rocky Road, Salted Caramel, Sticky Peanut Butter and more. Brownie Heaven have been making and selling their brownies since 2007, starting in their coffee shop and catering business in East Yorkshire, before expanding to food festivals and markets, before finally setting up their website for online mail order.

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They usually sell their Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs in boxes of four of one type, but recently sent me a mixed box for review with two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente. A box of four Cadbury’s Creme Egg Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs or Ferrero Rocher Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs retails for £22.95, a box of Salted Pretzel Caramel Scotch Eggs is £23.95 and both prices include courier delivery in the UK.

I thought these were great fun, and a really unusual idea too, even if they’ve been much copied since. The brownie is dense and rich, so a quarter or half egg at a time is plenty, which means you can share these with a friend or just eke them out for a week! We shared ours with some friends who also really enjoyed them.

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GIVEAWAY

Brownie Heaven are offering one mixed box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs to a reader of Kavey Eats. The box will contain two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente and includes delivery to a UK address.

HOW TO ENTER

You can enter the giveaway in 2 ways – entering both ways increases your chances of winning:

Entry 1 – Blog Comment
If you were designing a new brownie for Brownie Heaven, what would you put in the centre of a Chocolate Brownie Scotch Egg?

Entry 2 – Twitter
Follow both @Kavey and @brownieheaven on Twitter. Existing followers are, of course, welcome to enter! Then tweet the exact sentence (shown in italics) below.
I’d love to win a box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs by @BrownieHeaven from Kavey Eats! http://bit.ly/KaveyEatsBH #KaveyEatsBrownieHeaven
(Do not add my twitter handle or any other twitter handle to the beginning of the tweet or your entry will be considered invalid.
Please don’t leave a blog comment about your tweet either; I track twitter entries using the competition hash tag.)

RULES, TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • The deadline for entries is midnight GMT Friday 6th May 2016.
  • The two winners will be selected from all valid entries using a random number generator.
  • Entry instructions form part of the terms and conditions.
  • Where prizes are to be provided by a third party, Kavey Eats accepts no responsibility for the acts or defaults of that third party.
  • The prize is a Brownie Heaven box containing two Scotch Cream Eggs, one Salted Pretzel Scotch Caramel Egg and one Ferrero Scotch Brownie Eggcelente. Delivery to a UK address is included.
  • The prize is offered by Brownie Heaven and cannot be redeemed for a cash value.
  • One blog entry per person only. One Twitter entry per person only. You may enter both ways but you do not have to do so for each individual entry to be valid.
  • For Twitter entries, entrants must be following @Kavey and @brownieheaven at the time of notification.
  • Blog comment entries must provide a valid email address for contact.
  • The winners will be notified by email or Twitter so please make sure you check relevant accounts for the notification message.
  • If no response is received from a winner within 10 days of notification, the prize will be forfeit and a new winner will be picked and contacted.

Kavey Eats received a review box of Chocolate Brownie Scotch Eggs from Brownie Heaven.

 

Pete and I have been waffling-mad the last few weeks! We’ve made regular waffles, Belgian waffles, mashed potato waffles and more, and the list of ideas still to try is at least ten times that long.

It’s all down to our new waffle maker, Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle. We’ve already test driven the Smart Scoop ice cream machine, the Quick Touch microwave and the Tea Maker kettle, all part of the same range, and all with similarly clever ideas that make using each one a pleasure.

The Smart Waffle has a number of clever features that set it above other waffle makers on the market. There’s a wide wraparound moat to catch and cook overflow batter, so you can safely add enough batter to properly fill the space without worrying that the excess will surge out and make a mess on your worktop. The waffle plates are made of cast aluminium which ensures that heat is distributed evenly, and they are also are good and deep, creating lovely thick, square waffles. The housing is stainless steel and easy to keep clean.

There are different settings for different types of waffles – Belgian, Classic, Chocolate or Buttermilk – and you can also adjust colour from Light to Dark with 12 levels to choose from. These combine to set temperature and cooking time automatically. Like the microwave, there’s the A Bit More button to give a short burst of extra cooking time if you open the machine when it beeps that it’s done but feel it needs a little longer after all.

So far, we’ve found it a pleasure to use, and all our different waffle recipes have all come out very well.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats-8237 The Smart Waffle

Next on the list was a decadent chocolate waffle that would be perfect for breakfast or dessert. There are hundreds of recipes all around the web to choose from but the one that stood out was this brownie belgium waffle by American blogger Sommer. This produces a super rich chocolate waffle that’s not as sweet as you’d assume given the 100 grams of sugar. The ‘double chocolate’ comes from cocoa powder and chocolate chips and the soft interior and crisp exterior are exactly what’s promised by ‘brownie-style’. I’ve rewritten the recipe in metric measurements and provided new instructions to suit our waffle maker, though of course you can adjust to use whatever waffle maker you have.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats (2)

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Belgian Waffles

Makes 4 waffles in the Smart Waffle maker

Ingredients
Waffle batter

200 g granulated sugar
80 g plain flour
80 g (unsweetened) cocoa powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
60 ml water
90 g unsalted butter, melted
120 g mini dark chocolate chips*
vegetable oil, to spray
Topping
100 ml double cream
1 tablespoon icing sugar
1-2 bananas
1 small pack blueberries

Note: If you cannot find mini dark chocolate chips, finely chop a bar of dark chocolate instead. The small size allows little bits of chocolate to distribute evenly within the batter.

Method

  • Preheat your waffle maker. Ours has a Belgian waffle setting, which we selected for this recipe, with the darkness level set to 2 up from Lightest.
  • In a large bowl mix sugar, flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt.
  • In a small bowl beat the eggs, vanilla extract and water, before adding to the dry ingredients and mixing together.
  • Add in the melted butter and beat vigorously to mix well and create a thick, gloopy batter.
  • Stir in the chocolate chips.
  • Oil the waffle maker with vegetable oil using a spray or wipe on with kitchen towel.
  • Spoon a quarter of the batter into each half of the waffle machine, close and cook until the machine beeps (about 3 minutes), or until fully shaped but soft to the touch.
  • Open the machine and leave to cool for 30 seconds. As these waffles are super soft and very fragile when hot, we found it easiest to place a small baking tray over the cooked waffles and flip the entire machine upside down; this is a two person job but the easiest way to get them out without breaking. After a few seconds of cooling outside the waffle machine, the surfaces start to crisp up beautifully. The inside stays soft, like a brownie or chocolate cake.
    If flipping the waffle machine over is not a good option for you, cook the waffles on the Lightest setting, open the waffle maker when it beeps done and leave in the machine to cool down for at least 5 minutes before carefully removing the waffles with a pair flexible spatulas.
  • Repeat cooking steps for second half of the mixture.
  • We served with lightly-sweetened whipped double cream, sliced bananas and blueberries.

Double Chocolate Brownie-Style Waffles - Kavey Eats (1)

You may also enjoy these sweet waffle recipes from fellow food bloggers:

Kavey Eats received a Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Waffle for review. As always, I was not expected to write a positive review; all opinions are my own and I recommend only products I truly believe in. This post contains affiliate links; please see my sidebar for further information.

 

I’ve been enthusing for over a year about my friend Dom Ramsey’s bean-to-bar chocolate business, Damson, established in February 2015 and now based in dedicated premises in Chapel Market, Angel Islington. Dom makes superb chocolate which won awards from the get go and you can buy it in the shop or online. If you’ve not tried it yet, his Buffalo Milk chocolate (of which there have been several batches made with different cocoa beans) is amazing, and the Madagascar 70% is also a winner. The Liquorice & Sea Salt is not one I’m ever going to try but I know liquorice fans adore it. And if you can get your hands on the Whisky Cream – milk chocolate aged alongside wooden chips from a barrel in which Glen Garioch whisky was once aged, until the chocolate takes on flavours that soaked into the wood – you won’t be sorry!

DamsonWhiskyCream

Until recently, I thought Dom was the only bean-to-bar chocolate producer in London – the majority of specialist chocolate shops in London are chocolatiers and most chocolatiers don’t make bean-to-bar chocolate, they buy chocolate in from producers and either use it as is in their chocolate products, or blend different batches to create just what they need. Some work with the producers to have chocolate made to their personal specifications, giving them great control over quality and flavour without taking on the production directly.

But Dom tells me that the bean-to-bar category is expanding fast and that there are now many more people producing their own chocolate across the UK. Some of those are making chocolate at home, for their own pleasure and enjoyment, and others are creating businesses to sell their chocolate commercially.

Tadzio Chocolate on Kavey Eats -084518

A few weeks ago I heard from Tad Osborne, founder of Tadzio Chocolate, another London-based bean-to-bar producer making chocolate from single source beans and unrefined cane sugar. He roasts, hand winnows (peels), grinds and conches by hand and then sets some of the chocolate into solid bars, using the rest to make chocolate truffles.

Tad has always enjoyed good chocolate and making chocolate brownies and truffles for friends but, like Dom, his background is not a culinary one; indeed he is currently still working as a contractor in financial services.

A few months ago he travelled to Vietnam and while there he visited MAROU’s factory in Ho Chi Minh City. MAROU, founded by Samuel Maruta and Vincent Morou, is one of my favourite chocolate brands (one I first tried through Dom, I think), so I can completely understand how Tad was so inspired. As he says, ‘their chocolate is incredible and uses nothing but sugar and cocoa solids. When I got home I bought a grinder and some cocoa beans and got to work. That was about 4 months ago.

Like Marou, Tadzio Chocolate uses nothing but minimum 70% cocoa solids and unrefined cane sugar; Tad is keen ‘to let people taste and enjoy the vast difference in cocoa varieties and regions without disguising their flavours.

I am enormously taken with the Japanese-design packaging – a small circular red seal that turns out to be Tad’s name (‘Tado’) in the phonetic hiragana script – and beautiful artistic stickers used to seal wrappers and bags. I ask Tad to tell me more about it and he explains that he spent some time living in Japan, has a Japanese girlfriend and is also appreciative of ‘the meticulous attention to detail the Japanese have in all of their activities’, something he tries to adopt himself. It’s a way to express something about himself as a person in the way he presents his products.

Tadzio Chocolate on Kavey Eats -160114 Tadzio Chocolate on Kavey Eats -160243

As for the chocolate, Tad first sent me a bar of 71% Venezuelan Puerto Cabello and a bag of truffles made from the same chocolate plus cream, vanilla essence and salt. Both are delicious. The chocolate is well made, with a pleasing aroma, nice snap and really rich and intense flavours, mostly in the fruity spectrum – both fresh berries and dried fruit – but with quite low acidity, just enough to give balance. I would recommend that Tad tap the moulds more robustly after pouring in the chocolate as there were a few bubbles in the bar, but this is a minor issue and doesn’t affect taste or texture of the chocolate itself.

The truffles are similarly rich and intense. I can’t detect the vanilla but I’m glad of that – I’m not sure this chocolate needs it. I particularly like the smooth texture and same excellent flavour as in the bar.

It’s great to see more high quality bean-to-bar chocolate in London, and from what I’ve tried so far, Tadzio Chocolate will be a welcome addition to the category once he starts trading fully. I certainly look forward to trying more of his chocolate soon.

Thus far, Tad has set up a limited company and is licensed to sell his products, but hasn’t yet established a website or online store but you can get in touch with him via his Facebook page, or email him directly at tad.osborne@gmail.com if you’d like to place an order. His 50 gram bars are currently £3 each and a bag of 7 truffles is £6. As he makes small batches, you will need to ask him what variety he has available at the time.

Kavey Eats received review samples from Tadzio Chocolate.

 

PARTNEREDPOST_thumb.jpg

I’ve said it before and I’ll surely say it again: British beef and lamb are fantastic and really can’t be beaten for quality and taste!

Simply Beef and Lamb, a division of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board, support the Red Tractor Mark and the Quality Standard Mark for beef and lamb, so that consumers can be confident about what they are buying. Their website also provides helpful information on nutrition, understanding different cuts of meat, advice on cooking and carving and of course, lots of recipes to enjoy.

These days most of us eat far more globally than our parents and grandparents, by which I mean we travel the world on our plates; Chinese, Indian, Mexican, Thai, Vietnamese… these and many more have become a regular part of our repertoire, and it’s commonplace to find exotic ingredients in the local supermarket.

But I’d like to use this post to remind you not to overlook the joy of beef and lamb, or to forget the simple, hearty meals that have been enjoyed across the UK and Europe for generations. One-pot dishes are particularly handy for easy weekday suppers, and great for busy weekends too. The #LivePeasant is all about encouraging us to embrace a more rustic approach to cooking, and to think about traditional recipes using beef and lamb.

Food shoot at First Option studios for ADHB

One such hearty recipe recommended (and provided) by Simply Beef and Lamb is this delicious beef goulash made with stewing or braising beef.

Goulash is a Hungarian soup or stew seasoned with paprika, and popular not only in Hungary but across Central Europe, Scandinavia and Southern Europe. It originated in the 9th century with shepherds and cattle herders who carried cubes of sun-dried meat with them and reconstituted these into a nutritious stew by cooking them in water – indeed the name itself comes from gulyás which means herder. Tomato and paprika are more recent additions, but very much a part of the recipe today.

Beef Goulash

Serves 4
Preparation time: 10-15 minutes
Cooking time: 1-1½ hours

Ingredients
450g/1lb lean boneless shin, stewing or braising beef, cut into 2.5cm/1 inch cubes
Salt and freshly milled black pepper
30ml/2tbsp sunflower oil
2 large onions, peeled and sliced OR 2 x 450g packs diced onions
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed OR 5ml/1tsp garlic purée
15ml/1tbsp ground paprika
5ml/1tsp caraway seeds, optional
600ml/1pint good, hot beef stock
1 x 400g can chopped tomatoes
15ml/1tbsp tomato purée
15ml/1tbsp cornflour
Freshly chopped parsley, to garnish
Soured cream, to garnish

Method

  • Place the beef in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper.

Beef Goulash Simply Beef and Lamb

  • Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan and cook the meat in batches for 3-4 minutes until brown.
  • Transfer to a large casserole dish. In the same pan cook the onions and garlic with the paprika, caraway seeds (if used) .

Beef Goulash Simply Beef and Lamb

  • Add the stock, tomatoes and tomato purée. Bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer over a low heat for 1-1½ hours.
  • Mix the cornflour with 60ml/4tbsp cold water and stir into the goulash. Bring to the boil, stirring occasionally.
  • Reduce the heat and simmer for a further 5 minutes.
  • Garnish with parsley and a swirl of soured cream before serving with cooked potatoes or pasta.

Beef Ghoulash Simply Beef and Lamb

If you are not sure which cuts of beef are best suited for which kind of dishes and cooking techniques, check out my comprehensive guide on beef cuts and cooking here.

What’s your favourite one-pot recipe for beef or lamb?

I’ll be sharing one of my own much-loved one-pot lamb recipes in a few weeks time. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy the goulash!

Recipe and images provided by Simply Beef and Lamb. This post is a paid commission for Simply Beef and Lamb and part of their #LivePeasant campaign. Visit their website for more great beef and lamb recipes and detailed nutritional information.

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